Super Bowl 50 Sets a New CBS Streaming Record

The Super Bowl is one of the most popular sporting events worldwide and continues to attract very large audiences. This year’s event was hosted at Levi’s Stadium in the San Francisco Bay Area, and contested between the Carolina Panthers and Denver Broncos. According to broadcaster CBS, the average cost of a 30-second commercial during the game was a staggering $5 million. Unlike the majority of NFL games, the Super Bowl manages to create interest from new viewers outside of the US who aren’t overly versed with the rules. Perhaps, they want to see the half time show, adverts or simply intrigued by the spectacle. As a Brit, I don’t really follow American football, but the Super Bowl is always an interesting watch!

In terms of media coverage, the Super Bowl 50 was a resounding success and managed to attract a “record audience” streaming the game. Unfortunately, there’s no specific numbers from CBS to judge how many people tuned in, but it’s clearly broke last year’s figure of 800,000 viewers per minute. Even if you really dislike American football, this is an extremely impressive and exemplifies the importance of digital media. Part of this success is down to CBS encouraging streaming through various devices including the Apple TV, Roku Stick and Xbox One. It’s not unreasonable to think that streaming could take over from traditional TV broadcasts in the next 10-15 years. Technical problems during the stream might deter people from using it in the future, but organisers are becoming more aware of how to build the correct infrastructure for more viewers.

In an ideal world, I’d love to know the exact figures, because the Super Bowl provides an extreme example of consumers adopting streaming on a mass scale. Still, TV will reign supreme for some time, but people are now more open to streaming content online.

Image courtesy of TheAtlantic.com

Yahoo Pays NFL to Stream a Regular-Season Game for Free

On Wednesday, Yahoo announced a partnership with the NFL to stream a regular-season football game across the globe for free.

The game between the Buffalo Bills and Jacksonville Jaguars will take place on October 25 in London and will also air “exclusively” on Yahoo’s Web and app platforms across the globe, with the exception of the teams’ local TV affiliates—meaning that no cable or satellite network, including paid services like DirecTV Sunday Ticket, will air the game. Yahoo will rely on a CBS crew to produce the broadcast, but have not released any more information.

ArsTechnica reported:

“This confirms the news that was released in early March about plans to globally stream the contest though, at the time, neither a provider nor any possible price had been confirmed. A Sports Illustrated report on the announcement claimed that other potential bidders for the digital rights had been turned down due to their desire to attach a pay-per-view charge to the match; meanwhile, an NFL spokesperson told Sports Business Daily that the league had reached out to companies like Google, Amazon, and Apple before signing on with Yahoo.

The news comes following the NFL’s March decision to loosen its decades-old rules about blacking out local game broadcasts due to poor ticket sales, noting at the time that the league didn’t black out a single 2014-15 game.”

Yahoo has also posted:

“For the first time in NFL history, anyone with an internet connection can tune in, exclusively on Yahoo, from anywhere to watch a live football game for free. Whether you’re on your phone, tablet, laptop, console or connected device — we’ve got you covered.”

Could this be the return of free sports streaming? I certainly hope so!

Thank you to CNN for providing us with this information

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NFL Now App Will Arrive on Apple TV This Month

NFL Fan? Do you own Apple TV? Well if you said yes to both of those questions then you’re in luck! The official NFL Now app is hitting Apple TV this month. The image you see above is apparently a picture taken by an employee at NFL during a testing session of the app, it shows the most popular videos and highlights as well as a ‘My Channel’ section which looks like it offers videos and highlights related to stuff you’ve previously watched or have selected to see more of.

The app will also feature extensive archives, on-demand highlights and news broadcasts. There will also be a load of content created by the NFL team available to watch on the app, this varies from locker room interviews to player specific features.  The app will arrive in time for NFL fans to enjoy the 2014 – 2015 season, a perfect time to stress test the new system. NFL Now app will also be landing on other platforms includes iOS devices, Xbox, and Roku set top boxes.

Thanks to Tweaktown for supplying us with this information.

Image courtesy of Tweaktown.

EA Launches a $30 per Year Unlimited Gaming on Xbox One

Console games are expensive, to expensive for many people to try and play as many games as they would like to. EA seem to have understood this and launches a new service for Xbox One for just those people.

A Netflix like service called ‘EA Access’ where you pay $4,99 for one month or €29,99 if you want a whole year, and in return can play as many games as you like.

So far there is a limited selection of titles, only counting Madden 25, Fifa 14, Battlefield 4 and Peggle 2. It isn’t much, but it is a start, and we can expect to see a lot more added in the future. The service is also said to allow you to play new games before they launch to the general public, including Madden, NFL, FIFA and Dragon Age: Inquisition.

When a game normally cost $70 and they release one a year like with the sport titles, you can see why this quickly could become popular among console gamers.

EA Access will be sold in retail stores as well as on Xbox Live. The service has launched as a beta today for a small part of Xbox One owners. No timeline has been given for the public roll out of the service. On the bright side, it will give them time to add more games to the service.

Thank you TechCrunch for providing us with this information

Image courtesy of TechCrunch