Energy-Friendly Chip Could Boost Neural Networks

The quest to gain a greater insight into artificial Intelligence has been exciting and has also opened up a range of possibilities that have included “convolutional neural networks”, these are large visual networks of simple information-processing units which are loosely modelled on the anatomy of the human brain.

These networks are typically implemented using the more familiar graphics processing units (GPUs). A mobile GPU might have as many as 200 cores or processing units, this means that it is suited to “simulating a network of distributed processors”. Now, a further development in this area could lead to the potential for a specifically designed chip that has a sole purpose of implementing a neural network.

MIT researchers have presented the aforementioned chip at the “International Solid-State Circuits Conference in San Francisco”. The advantages of this chip include the notion that it is 10 times more efficient than an average mobile GPU, this could lead, in theory, to mobile devices being able to run powerful artificial intelligence algorithms locally, rather than relying on the cloud to process data.

The new chip, coined “Eyeriss” could, lead to the expansion of capabilities that includes the Internet of things, or put simply, where everything from a car to a cow, (yes apparently) would have sensors that are able to submit real-time data to networked servers. This would then open up horizons for artificial intelligence algorithms to make those important decisions.

Before I sign off I wanted to further delve into the workings of a neural network, the workings are that it is typically organised into layers, each of these layers contains a processing node. Data is then divided up among these nodes within the bottom layer, each node then manipulates the data it receives before passing it on to nodes within the next layer. This process is then repeated until “the output of the final layer yields the solution to a computational problem.” It is certainly fascinating and opens up a world of interesting avenues with which to explore, when you combine science and tech, the outcome is at the very least educational with the potential for it to be life changing.         .

Apple Fighting to Prevent Release of Steve Jobs Deposition

The Associated Press, CNN and Bloomberg have filled a motion to have the video deposition of Steve Jobs released from the ongoing iPod lawsuit. The publications are in a battle against Apple’s lawyers who are actively seeking it stays confined to the courtroom.

Attorney Thomas Burke made the point that there would be no legal case to prevent its release, considering it was merely a “regular testimony” with a significant level of interest from the public. Apple’s lead attorney requested that the video should not be released. The video itself is 2 hours long, and features Steve Jobs discussing Apple, its competitors and iTunes, 6 months before his death in October of 2011. Subsequently, despite it having never been seen publicly, the deposition would not be the last known recorded footage of Jobs – that was his appearance before the Cupertino City Council in June 2011, concerning the new Apple campus.

The iPod lawsuit concerns the digital rights management of the devices between 2006 and 2009, when it’s alleged that the company acted unfairly by blocking users from installing content from competing music services on their iPods.

Source: CNET Via The Verge

Steve Jobs Still Delivering Sharp Opinions From the Grave

The other day we reported on the news that Steve Jobs was to appear in court over an iPod lawsuit via a video deposition recorded in 2011.

Well the trial began yesterday, and we have some of the first details of what was said in that video. According to Reuters, Jobs delivered a bit of a crushing blow to Real Networks, the company behind Real Player:

“During his 2011 deposition, Jobs displayed some of the edge he was known for, according to a transcript filed in court. Asked if he was familiar with Real Networks, Jobs replied: “Do they still exist?”

The video was shown alongside email exchanges between Jobs and other Apple executives. One of those emails from 2004, continued to add to the Real Networks bashing, with Jobs considering the release of a statement likening them to hackers:

“How’s this?” Jobs wrote. “‘We are stunned that Real is adopting the tactics and ethics of a hacker and breaking into the iPod.'”

Jobs said that Apple felt compelled to implement DRM on the iPod to make it more appealing to the music industry. At the time, illegal downloads had swarmed the internet, making iTunes something very difficult to get music executives to work with.

The trial continues, with current Apple SVPs Phil Schiller and Eddy Cue expected to make appearances.

Source: Reuters

35% of All US Internet Traffic Comes from Netflix

A new report says that 35% of all US internet traffic, on average during peak hours, comes from Netflix. A study was conducted by a company called Sandvine, best known for building ISP equipment. They said that Netflix accounted for 35% of downstream traffic in peak hours during the second half of 2014.

Interestingly, YouTube only accounted for 14% of downstream traffic, but on mobile devices there was a different story, with YouTube topping out the scale at 20%, closely followed by Facebook with 19%.

The study also revealed that Netlifx surprisingly comes second in upstream traffic, very high considering the site is all about downloading. BitTorrent came out on top at 25%.

The dominance of Netflix in internet traffic is yet another symbol of the website’s success and is perhaps also an example of how traditional television is facing ever growing competition from streaming websites.

 Source: USA Today

Internet Speed Might Increase Thanks to New ‘Teleportation’ Technology

People always thought about teleportation as a way of beaming beings or objects from one point in space and time to another. And the technology might even be achievable in the near future, according to professor Ronald Hanson from Delft University of Technology in Netherlands. But there might be a way to use the ‘teleportation’ method in other areas as well.

Hanson states that there is no law of physics preventing teleportation of large objects and humans alike. And that goes for teleporting information as well. In an experiment at the university, he was able to transport information encapsulated into subatomic particles between two targets situated three meters apart, having it be a success with 100% reliability.

During this experiment, four possible states are reported to have been transmitted. Each of the states related to a qubit, having it be the quantum equivalent of a digital bit. His next experiment now involves teleporting information between buildings in the university campus situated 1.3 km apart.

Though the technology is still in its early stages, it could revolutionise the way internet is delivered nowadays, having two notable major advantages. The first advantage is obviously incredibly high-speed connection and the second is network security, since information cannot be intercepted while travelling.

Thank you BGR for providing us with this information

NSA Reportedly Can Bug Computers Before They Reach Buyers

Apparently the NSA does not have to wait until people are using technology to start snooping on it. Spiegel has obtained documents which claim that the agency’s Tailored Access Operations (TAO) group can intercept computer equipment orders and install tracking hardware or software before the shipments even reach their buyers. The division can target a wide array of hardware, too. Another NSA section, ANT, reportedly has a catalog of tools that can install back doors in everything from Cisco and Huawei network systems through to hard drives from most major manufacturers, including Seagate and Western Digital. Some of these bugs can give the NSA “permanent” access, since they’re designed to persist if the owner wipes a device’s storage or upgrades its firmware.

The leak suggests that the targeted manufacturers aren’t aware of what’s happening; Cisco and other firms tell Spiegel they don’t coordinate with the NSA. These hardware interceptions are also limited in scope next to remote surveillance programs. The agency isn’t confirming any specifics, but it maintains that TAO is focused on exploiting foreign networks. Whether or not that’s true, the discoveries show that the NSA’s surveillance can reach the deepest levels of many networks.

Thank you Endgadget for providing us with this information
Image courtesy of Spiegel