AMD Graphics Roadmap Reveals Fiji Replacement

One of the biggest concerns about Polaris 10 has been whether or not it will be a true replacement for Fury X. With the latest leaks out, most of the information points to about 100W TDP with 2304 shaders and clock speeds around 1050Mhz. Compared to Nvidia’s Pascal GP104, this doesn’t sound very competitive, leading to concerns that Nvidia would dominate the high-end. With the release today of AMD’s more detailed roadmap, our concerns have been laid to rest.

The new official roadmap offers a bit more detail than the one AMD showed back at Capsaicin. The new one offers more detail around Polaris 10 and 11, with both chips working to replace the entire Fury and 300 series lineup. This means the top Polaris 11 chip will offer enough performance to at least match, if not exceed Fury X. This should be competitive enough against GP104. If the 2304 shader report is true, AMD has truly revamped GCN 4.0 into something that is significantly superior to GCN 1.0 while cutting power consumption at the same time.

The layout for Polaris compared to the current lineup also suggests there will be no rebrands for the 400 series. It suggests that Polaris 10 will go from about 490X to 480 while Polaris 11 will fill in 470X down to at least 460. With how well small die low power Polaris 11 has done, rebrands don’t really make any sense. Finally, Vega will drop in 2017 with HBM2 and not in late 2016 as some have hoped.

With the improvements AMD has done, I am really looking forward to what Polaris and GCN 4.0 will bring to the graphics landscape.

James Cameron Now Wants Five Avatar Films

After the success of Avatar at the box office, James Cameron revealed he wanted not one but two sequels to the film. This has now changed as Cameron now wants five Avatar films in total, all before 2024.

Avatar is often seen as the first film to truly introduce viewers to the benefits of a 3D film, with many leaving cinemas awe smacked by the content and depth they felt when viewing the natives fighting up close. The change came about “after meeting with a team of four screenwriters and a group of some of the top artists and designers in the world”, the ultimate result was that Cameron noticed he had more content than he wanted to fit into just two films, resulting in the dream of three, and then four sequels.

Cameron seems to have high hopes for the Avatar Films, saying that while only a few had seen initial concepts for the next film, those that had were left “speechless”. The next film is set for release in 2018, with the sequels set for 2020, 2022 and 2023, implying that there may be some overlap in the filming schedules to help create a smooth release model for such a large budget film series.

Did you like Avatar? When it comes to sequels are you a happy person or do you prefer to be a little more cautious about expecting great things after the first film in a series?

AMD Unveils Upcoming GPU Roadmap – Capsaicin

Even as Polaris approaches us quickly within 3 months, the planning for its successor has long been in the works. At their Capsaicin event, AMD took off the wraps for their upcoming GPU plans with a roadmap detailing the planned releases up till 2019. In keeping with the star nomenclature that started with Polaris and ditching the islands, we will have Vega and then Navi following Polaris.

Starting off with Polaris later this year, AMD’s main selling point it seems is the 2.5x performance per watt the new GCN architecture will bring. This is no doubt due to the combination of improved hardware itself, the new 14nm LPP process and DX12 finally making use of the previously wasted hardware resources like asynchronous controllers and shaders.

Moving along, we have Vega to release in what looks to be early 2017. The biggest change it seems is the use of HBM2, replacing GDDR5(X) and HBM1 no doubt. This means we can no doubt expected all Vega releases to utilize HBM2. While this may suggest Polaris won’t be using HBM2, it could also mean that only certain Polaris chips, likely only the high-end ones, will use HBM2.

Finally, we come to Navi, which should debut in early 2018. This release will have scalability and use of next-gen memory like Hyper-Memory Cube for instance. The scalability mention suggests either the use of smaller GCN units used to build the chip to better suit the market or a new process node. For now, we are probably better off trying to figure out what Polaris will be

Kingston NaVi Limited Edition DDR3 1600MHz 8GB Memory Kit Review

Introduction


Kingston are quite well known for their tendency to release limited edition products that are branded to celebrate certain events or partnerships and the NaVi series memory kits we have here today are no different. These NaVi series memory kits are essentially Kingston HyperX kits branded yellow to celebrate Kingston’s collaboration with the eSports Club Natus Vincere aka NaVi. Kingston says it is aiming these memory kits at gamers and enthusiasts, though I can see the appeal will most definitely be with gamers more than enthusiasts. That is because these kits only come with a 1600MHz speed in either 8GB or 16GB dual channel kits. They do of course come with the backing of Kingston’s quality standards and a lifetime warranty to support that. Part of the NaVi limited edition series also includes the NaVi HyperX 3K series SSD which will essentially be normal Hyper X 3K 120/240GB SSDs rebranded in the yellow NaVi pattern.

The packaging is simple and more or less identical to that of their packaging on other HyperX memory kits as it is essentially a HyperX kit.

The back details the information about why it is limited edition and the cooperation with NaVi.

Included is the memory kit and a warranty information document.