Mushkin Redline DDR4 3000MHz 16GB (4x4GB) Quad Channel Memory Kit Review

Introduction


The Mushkin Redline series is engineered to provide magnificent reliability and low latency while utilizing impressive memory speeds well beyond the DDR4 standard. Each Mushkin kit undergoes a rigorous testing procedure to reduce the possibility of hardware failure and backed by a generous lifetime warranty. This gives the purchaser peace-of-mind and ensures their investment is protected. On another note, Mushkin use high-quality ICs to maximize performance by finding the perfect balance between frequency and latency.

Today we’re taking a detailed look at a 3000MHz 16GB quad channel kit which adopts Mushkin’s FrostByte heatsink design and features timings of 15-15-15-35. The memory’s impressive memory speed to latency ratio should result in exceptional numbers, and I expect to see it compare favourably against rival offerings.

Specifications

Packaging and Accessories

The modules come in a stylish cardboard box which enhances the level of protection compared to traditional blister packs. Additionally, the small cut out allows you to see the memory in all its glory and increases your excitement during the unboxing process. It’s always great to see something a little unusual with memory packaging because the majority of kits take a fairly mundane approach to box design.

On the rear section, there’s a brief synopsis about the product’s reliability, and Mushkin’s commitment to providing excellent customer service.

A Closer Look

The memory’s primary colour is difficult to pinpoint as the red finish tends to lighten at certain angles. It’s really a cross between a dark red and pink, but once the modules are exposed to low-medium light conditions, they look like a typical red design. This unusual shading effect works superbly and makes the modules have a sense of character. I also really like the silver accent and subtle Mushkin branding which adds a sophisticated feel.

On another note, the distinctive shape on the heatspreaders stands out without detracting from the understated construction. Sadly, the green PCB doesn’t help matters and I’d much prefer to see a black PCB instead. Granted, this isn’t a major problem when the modules are installed, but it might irk some users wanting the perfect colour scheme, or using hefty LED illumination. Overall, the aesthetic design is excellent and should cater towards the mainstream gaming market rather nicely.

Mushkin Reactor 512GB Solid State Drive Review

Introduction


After I recently had a look at Mushkin’s Striker SSD, it is now time to take a closer look at the Mushkin Reactor SSD and that’s just what I am doing in today’s review. Mushkin’s Reactor solid state drive promises simultaneous capacity and performance while also keeping the initial costs of purchase in the mainstream spectrum. The Reactor drive is available in three capacities from 256GB to 1TB, but I’m taking a closer look at the 512GB model today.

The Mushkin Reactor is a basic mainstream drive that will be a great solution in any workstation system or gaming rig. It is built around the Silicon Motion SM2246EN controller which is a little cheaper than the Phison S10 for example. In return, we get a drive that is cheaper to purchase. It still delivers a great performance thanks to the use of MLC NAND and it is rated for sequential operations up to 560MB/s reading and 460MB/s writing. The random access performance isn’t bad at all either and the drive comes with a rating of up to 71K IOPS reading and up to 75K IOPS writing.

With solid performance figures like these, the Reactor drive has no reason to hide behind any other competing drives. Capacity wise you got three options in this series where the 512GB model that I’m having a look at today is right in the middle. There’s also a smaller version with 256GB capacity and the larger model with 1TB capacity. That’s a lot of fast storage at an affordable price thanks to clever hardware choices.

The drive has a couple features less than the Mushkin Striker SSD that I recently reviewed, but the basics are well covered on this drive too. The Reactor has the basic S.M.A.R.T. and Trim features as well as early weak block retirement, DataRefresh, and built-in BCH ECC with up to 66 bits per 1kb. The only thing that could be considered missing is DevSleep and that’s only really relevant for notebook users anyway.

Just because the Reactor drive doesn’t have the DevSleep feature doesn’t mean that it wouldn’t be a great upgrade for any notebook, laptop, or ultrabook out there. The 7mm height and default 2.5-inch form factor makes the upgrade quick and easy in either case. The Reactor is also a light drive and that’s something everyone can appreciate for their portable devices. You don’t want to carry any more weight with you than absolutely necessary.

The SATA power and data connectors are default in the sense of pin connectors, as it should be, but they are also another place where Mushkin managed to save a little in order to provide you with a better-priced drive. The connectors are almost transparent when you shine a light on them, but they still appear to be an equal quality when compared to conventional connectors stability.

Mushkin’s Reactor SSD is one of the few drives these days that’s still assembled with screws, which makes my life a lot easier when showing you what the drive looks like on the inside. The enclosure itself is put together with four screws and the PCB is also secured to the case with four screws. In the photo below we also see the thermal transfer pad located on the controller that connects to the chassis. This effectively turns the entire drive into a heatsink and it’s something we’ve seen quite often in other drives because it simply works well.

Having a closer look, we see the Silicon Motion SM2246EN controller next to eight NAND chips from SanDisk.

The other side of the PCB has another eight NAND chips and a Nanya RAM chip as a cache buffer.

Feature Highlights

  • Capacity and Performance
  • Optimal Data Flow: Optimized for dependable and reliable data flow
  • TRIM Support when used with compatible operating system
  • Shock-Resistant: Designed for continued reliable function
  • 3 Year Warranty: Quality guaranteed

Specifications

  • Capacity: 512GB
  • Dimensions: 7mm X 69.85mm X 100.5mm
  • Performance: Up to 560MB/sec (Read) / Up to 460MB/sec (Write)
  • IOPS: Up to 71,000 IOPS (Read) / Up to 75,000 IOPS (Write)
  • MTBF: 1,500,000 hours
  • Controller: Silicon Motion SM2246EN
  • Interface Type: SATA 3.0 (6Gb/s) interface (backwards compatible with SATA 2.0 (3Gb/s) and SATA 1.0 (1.5Gb/s))
  • Temperature Range: 0-70°C
  • Warranty: 3 years limited

Packaging

The Mushkin Reactor comes in a simple blister package that showcases the included drive itself.

It is surrounded by a simple inlay that also shows the drive’s main features on the rear. Other than that, there isn’t much to the package.

Mushkin Blackline Ridgeback DDR4 2400MHz 16GB Memory Kit Review

Introduction


The latest memory kit to arrive for review purposes is part of Muskin’s Blackline Ridgeback range. The sample we received opts for a 16GB capacity, 2400MHz speed and timings of 15-15-15-35. This is achieved with a very respectable voltage rating of 1.2V and showcases the modules’ efficiency. Mushkin is a pioneering memory manufacturer formed in 1994 and continues to release new DIMMs sporting unique designs at a very competitive price point. Unlike their competitors, Mushkin assembles and hand tests each memory kit in the USA while strictly monitoring their production line.

This results in exceptional reliability and minimizes the potential for customer returns. The company also selects low latency modules to find a suitable balance between raw frequency and operating latency. On another note, every Mushkin memory kit is backed with a lifetime warranty and approachable customer service team. Given their reputation in the industry, I expect the memory kit to perform admirably at stock values and have some good overclocking headroom. Let’s see how it compares to other dual channel alternatives!

Specifications

Packaging and Accessories

The product comes in a traditional blister pack, and adopts the slogan, “Gamers take notice, rivals take notes.” I quite like the background design which looks rather striking and adds a dash of colour.

On the rear, there’s a very detailed installation guide containing extremely clear diagrams. Inserting the modules into position is a very simple process, but it’s always good to include instructions for newcomers without any previous system building experience.

A Closer Look

The DIMMs convey a professional look via the neutral colour scheme and should suit a wide range of system builds. Additionally, the angled heat spreaders provide a distinctive appearance without straying too far from the sophisticated, understated design. I’m also really keen on the silver accents, which adds some visual flair. Sadly, the green PCB spoils the black theme somewhat and ruins the overall level of synergy. Although once the modules are installed, you shouldn’t notice the green PCB from a distance. Thankfully, there are some SKUs which already have the same heat spreader design and black PCB to complement it perfectly. Overall, Mushkin has done a commendable job in the product’s aesthetics and ensured it appeals to the core gaming demographic.

Mushkin Striker 480GB Solid State Drive Review

Introduction


It has been a while since we had a closer look at Mushkin’s lineup of solid state drives which makes today’s review a little more interesting than just looking at a great perming drive. On the test bench today is the Mushkin Striker 480GB 7mm slim solid state drive and I’ll put it through the usual tests to see how well it performs.

Mushkin built the Striker series with a performance that should satisfy the most demanding users, at least on the SATA3 connection. The Striker is built with Phison’s PS3110-S10 quad-core 8-channel controller which is coupled with quality MLC NAND. Three of the cores are dedicated for flash management and the controller also supports 256-bit AES encryption and Opal 2.0. These things coupled make for a great performing drive and this 480GB model is rated for up to 565 MB/s read and 550MB/s write speeds. The IOPS are rated around 90K for both read and write.

Performance is only one aspect of a drive, it also has to be reliable and keep your data error free. The Phison PS3110-S10 controller supports end-to-end data path protection, SmartECC, SmartRefresh, SmartFlush, and GuaranteedFlush. The end-to-end data protection makes sure that the data stays uncorrupted during the travels through the different parts of the hardware until it reaches the NAND flash.

SmartFlush is a proprietary algorithm to minimize DRAM utilization for user data. The Smart On-the-fly Flushing and Smart Triggered Flushing constantly flush data and re-organize random data chunks in the cache to minimize the time data stays in the cache as well as keep your data safe.

SmartRefresh consists of two parts that essentially are the wear-leveling algorithms. The run-time media scan and idle-time media scan detects ECC bit during read and idle operations and reallocated data to healthy blocks when the ECC bit exceeds the threshold.

Overall, the drive has all the features that you will want in a drive and that should make sure that you have a great performing drive for many years to come. Next to the ECC, garbage collection, and wear-level algorithms, the Mushkin Striker also supports DevSleep (DEVSLP), TRIM, and SMART.

The drive in itself is very plain with its simple black enclosure and sticker on the top. You’ll find all the relevant information such as serial number and capacity on that label, and what else do you need on a solid state drive? Mushkin backs the Striker SSD with a 3-year warranty and it’s also worth mentioning that drives all are assembled in the US.

Inside the two-piece snap-together enclosure is a 2/3rd length PCB. One side holds four of the NAND chips as well as the Phison S10 controller and the Nanya cache chip.

On the other side of the PCB are four more NAND chips in order to provide the 480GB capacity.

Feature Highlights

  • 3-Year Warranty
  • Optimal Data Flow
  • TRIM Support
  • Schock-Resistant
  • Extreme Performance

Specifications

Packaging

The Mushkin Striker comes in a simple blister package that showcases the included drive itself on both sides.

It is surrounded by a simple inlay that also shows the drive’s main features on the rear. Other than that, there isn’t much to the package.

Mushkin Display Latest Memory Products @ CES 2016

CES 2016: We’re here at the Mushkin suite in Las Vegas, and we’re very happy to see they’ve rolled out several new storage products for 2016. First up we have the Eco3, which features the Silicon Motion SM2256 controller, SATA 3.1 6Gb/s, and read and write speeds of 560MB/s and 515MB/s respectively with up to 87,000 IOPS. Additional features include SLC caching, Enhanced Data Protection Suite and a 3-year warranty.

The Eco3 is said to be exclusive to Newegg, at least for now, but the Triactor is virtually identical and will be available globally. No firm pricing at the moment, but expect it to be fiercely competitive.

The new 2TB reactor features the 2246 Silicon Motion controller and will launch in Q2.

The Striker, an enterprise focused SSD, is expect to launch late Q1. It will feature 565MB/s 88,000 IPS read and 550MB/s 92,000 IOPS write.

Pro camera users will be happy to see their new ICON compact flash cards, featuring 1066x speed with data transfers of 160MB/s and 256 and 512GB models being available in late Q1. Most interesting is that they’re expect to undercut the market prices of popular cards by a big margin, so keep an eye out for these.

Their latest prototype, two SM2246 controllers in RAID. The system will still handle this as a single drive, and performance will take a little bit of a hit, but when it comes to capacity for NAS setups, but expect a fantastic price per gigabyte option somewhere in Q2.

Mushkin Redline and Blackline Ridgeback DDR4 Memory Now Available

Mushkin originally unveiled their DDR4 Ridgeback memory modules in the Blackline and Redline versions back at CES 2015 and now they’ve finally been released to the market and are available. The new modules are optimized for both the Intel X99 platform as well as the just released Skylake.

The Ridgeback heatsink is cut from aircraft-grade anodized aluminium that improves the heat dissipation that can give the user that extra bit of headroom or stability. The DDR4 modules are loaded with XMP 2.0 profiles for easy setup and reliable overclocking.

Muskin’s memory modules are built with hand-screened DRAM and undergo rigorous testing in the US-based facilities before leaving on route to shops and distributors before finally arriving in your home.

The new modules are currently available as single modules, dual kits, and four-piece kits with 8GB modules. The speed ranges from 2133MHz to 2400MHz with 12-12-12-35 and 15-15-15-35 timings. More versions with different capacities, module amount, and speeds are bound to come later on.

Both the red and black heat spreaders look so great that it’s almost a shame that Mushkin didn’t go for a black PCB on these modules. It could have given them that little bit of extra wow effect, but on the other hand, you won’t see much of it once they are plugged into your motherboard.

Mushkin Launches New ATLAS VITAL Family of Solid-State Drives

Mushkin announced its latest addition to the ATLAS family of products, the new ATLAS VITAL M.2 2280 Series for Ultrabooks, notebooks, and small form-factor PCs. Atlas Vital is said to be suitable for mobile gamers, professionals, or general end-users looking to take their computing experience to the next level with solid state storage.

The drive comes in a quite a few capacity versions, but all in the M.2 2280 form factor. There will be 120GB, 140GB, 250GB, 480GB, and 500GB versions of this SandForce SF-2000 series based solid state drive. It seems like somewhat of a weird choice to go with a SandForce controller these days, as there are far better ones available. It isn’t a bad controller either and the Atlas Vital drive can perform sequential speeds up to 550MB/s while reading and 535MB/s while writing. The random 4K performance is rated up to 86K IOPS for low-latency and high throughput.

The Atlas Vital is aimed at the value-minded users looking to improve their experience over traditional hard drives and that also explains the choice of controller. It is a cheaper controller that allows Mushkin to create a better performing drive at a lower price, but at the costs of a few features.

Mushkin did not announce the availability or price of the drives yet, but those information are sure to follow very soon.

Mushkin Expands the REACTOR SSD Series

Mushkin has announced the expansion of their REACTOR SSD line-up in recognition that not every user needs the same amount of storage. The REACTOR SSD was launched as a 1TB version which might be too much for some people, both storage-wise and certainly on the price point. Now Mushkin has added a 256GB and a 512GB version to the series for just those people.

The Mushkin REACTOR SSD is built around a Silicon Motion SM2246EN SSD controller and it is rated with transfer speeds of up to 560MB/s reading and 460MB/s writing in sequential tests. The random 4K figures look equally great with a performance of 74K IOPS read and 76K IOPS write.

Mushkin is an American company that both develops and manufactures their products in-country, so it’s no surprise that this is where the drives will be available first. American customers and fans can also get a little bonus at the moment as Mushkin launched a new campaign together with NewEgg for a bonus on your purchase as well as a sweepstake for a complete gaming system.

 

To celebrate this launch of these two new REACTOR capacities, Mushkin launched a campaign with NewEgg where you’ll get a $30 Ghost Recon Phantoms voucher with the purchase of participating Mushkin products and as long as supply lasts. Starting May 1, 2015, gaming fans can also enter the Ghost Recon Phantoms Sweepstakes for a chance to win up a custom-built Mushkin Extreme Gaming PC and much more.

Mushkin Reveals a New Line of On-The-Go Battery Packs

If you’re one of those people, always on the go and finding yourself with flat batteries in your smart devices, then you might want to invest in a mobile battery pack. More and more of them become available and Muskin has revealed their new reVIVE family of portable battery packs.

“As modern lifestyles and careers demand greater use of smartphones and tablets, a secondary demand rises for increased battery life to bolster constant on-the-go device usage. Our reVIVE battery packs serve as an affordable remedy to a draining mobile platform,” said Nicolas Villalobos, Director, Global Marketing at Mushkin Inc. “Mushkin’s reVIVE battery packs are just one of many CE-type products to launch from Mushkin in the future.”

The new reVIVE series power banks have a dual 5V USB output, one at 1A and one at 2.1A. This enables you to charge both tablets and smartphones at the same time. With a capacity between 4400 and 13200 mAh, you’ll be able to do this multiple times before you have to recharge the unit itself.

The reVIVE battery packs also feature over-charge protection, over-discharge protection, and short-circuit protection. Release is scheduled for March, but no word on pricing yet besides the term “affordable”.

Thanks to Mushkin for providing us with this information

 

Mushkin Announced New Ridgeback Heatsink Design

Most manufacturers just adapted their old and proven heatsink design to their new DDR 4 memory, but not so Mushkin. They have created the new and elegant looking Ridgeback heatsink for the Blackline and Redline memory modules.

The new heatsinks are cut from aircraft-grade aluminium and each module is hand tested and validated on motherboards from all major manufacturers. The Ridgeback DDR4 modules naturally feature XMP 2.0 profiles for easy setup with Intel X99 platforms and the latest Core i7 processors.

Seen below is the current Redline design that while being efficient, isn’t the most beautiful to look at. The new design is a welcome addition to otherwise great memory modules.

The new Ridgeback DDR4 modules are officially scheduled to launch within Q1 2015.

Thanks to Muskin for providing us with this information

Mushkin Announced the STRIKER Line SSDs

Mushkin launched a new line of SSDs during CES 2015 in Las Vegas, the new STRIKER series. The new line of drives boast top-tier performance specifications and are considered an important step forward for Mushkin to offer the most well-rounded SSD lineup – producing solutions for high value, performance, and capacity.

“Mushkin is committed to giving our customers the best performing and most reliable SSDs and our new STRIKER family of drives delivers,” said Brian Flood, Director of Product Management at Mushkin. “With an ever-increasing demand for greater performance, the new STRIKER drives provides the ultimate combination of speed and reliability for today’s demanding applications.”

The STRIKER SSD offers sequential read and write speeds of up to 565MB/s and 550MB/s respectively and has a random performance of up to 90K IOPS. The new drive comes in a variety of capacities ranging from 240GB to 960GB capacities.

Availability for the new STRIKER SSD series is set for Q1 2015, but no word on pricing for these made in USA drives yet.

Features of the STRIKER line of SSDs include:

  • Phison PS3110-S10 controller
  • Quad core, 8-channel
  • 256-bit AES encryption support, Opal 2.0
  • End-to-End data path protection, SmartECC, SmartRefresh, SmartFlush, GuaranteedFlush
  • SATA 3.0 (6Gb/s) interface (backwards compatible with SATA 3Gb/s and 1.5Gb/s)
  • Top-tier performance specifications
  • TRIM/SMART support (OS/driver support required)
  • DEVSLP support for ultra-low power consumption
  • 120 bit per 2KB ECC strength
  • High-speed MLC NAND
  • 2.5” 7mm form factor
  • User-upgradeable firmware

Thanks to Mushkin for providing us with this information

Latest Mushkin Products on Display @ CES 2015

Mustkin had a lot of great products on display at CES 2015, including their new 1TB SATA 3 Reactor SSD, which offers all the latest features we’ve come to expect from the SSD and Mushkin promise that it’ll be competitively price. There’s little in the way of innovation in the 2.5″ market, but prices are dropping like crazy and that’s no bad thing.

Their latest DRR3 models, which are pretty straight forward stuff, but they do feature a cool heatsink design that will hopefully help push some good overclocks.

Mobile storage may not be too excitingbut their Ventura Ultra offers massive storage, incredible speed and has already proven usful in the industrial market, as they were used by the CGI team for the latest Transformers movie, thanks to their rock solid performance; perfect for rendering.

No line-up would be complete without a range of DDR4 modules. These feature their lovely Ridgeback heatsink design and will no doubt be damn expensive, but offer up crazy levels of performance.

Their new M.2 modules, as well as their PCI adaptor card.

What’s interesting if that the modules can be stacked, allowing the manufacturer to easily build bigger size PCIe drives, while you could always add more, or change the internal drives yourself if you really needed to.

Mushkin Released 1TB Reactor 2.5-inch Solid State Drive

Mushkin unveils the new Reactor series of solid-state drives that offer 1TB capacity without costing an arm and a leg. The Reactor SSD provides the extreme performance benefits of a solid-state drive while giving you the big data capacity of a mechanical hard drive.

It features the Silicon Motion SM2246EN controller and can reach transfer speeds of up to 560MB/s while reading and 460MB/s writing. The random 4K performance is rated to 74K/76K read/write IOPS. Mushkin didn’t provide any information on what NAND type is used, but some shops have it listed as MLC. If this is true, it’s something that will let this disk stand out from the competition budget models of the same size.

The Reactor 1TB solid state drive features S.M.A.R.T., TRIM, NCQ, DevSleep, DataRefresh, EartlyRetirement, Secure Erase, Shock Resistant and more and comes backed by a 3-year warranty. It is already available at some retailers and can be bought for £299.00 at Alternate for example.

Thanks to Mushkin for providing us with this information

Images courtesy of Mushkin

Mushkin Introduces the Updated Chronos G2 SSD

Mushkin is no stranger in the memory market and their SSDs and memory are well-known. As such, they’ve just released their latest addition to the Chronos family of Solid State Drives, the Chronos G2. This isn’t an entirely new drive, but rather a refresh of an old drive with improved components, and probably improved firmware as well. The new Chronos G2 is available in four sizes: 60, 120, 240 and 480 GB; so there should be a fit for almost every usage need.

“If you want the most innovative Mushkin SSD ever, you’ll have to be more specific. Mushkin doesn’t only focus on launching new and innovative storage and memory solutions, we are always looking for new ways to enhance our existing products as we are doing with our value Chronos G2,” said Nicolas Villalobos, Director of Global Marketing at Mushkin Inc. “A reincarnation of the legendary Chronos, the Chronos G2 Series was born to stand out from the crowd. Its competition-surpassing value give Mushkin’s Value SSD an oversized attitude.”

The Chronos G2 is a budget oriented drive, designed for the user who doesn’t want to blow his wallet on a new drive upgrade. It still promises some great performance figures, with up to 555 MB/s readi and up to 535 MB/s at write speeds. The drive also delivers a random write performance of up to 90K IOPS. However, the performance figures do vary quite a bit depending on the capacity, but this might just be the product pages that aren’t fully updated yet. For example the IOPS were only given for the 480 GB model and not for the three smaller ones.

The new drive is rated for 1.5 million hours before failure and comes with a 3-year limited warranty. Muskin used a SandForce SF-2000 series controller for this drive, a choice some will love and some will hate. One of the big improvements in this version is the use of high grade MLC flash instead of asyncron flash like the previous model. The drives support S.M.A.R.T., TRIM and NCQ. While the product page states that the drive is 7 mm high, it might actually be 9.5 mm instead; at least when looking at the shop listings.

The drives are available at some retailers and more listings will surely follow as stock arrives. At the time of writing the 480 GB model can be had for £177.96 (£0,37 per GB) via Amazon UK and the 60 GB model can be had for £47.39 (£0.79 per GB). Our US readers can find the drives at newegg among others for a price of $49.99 for the 60 GB model ($0.83 per GB) and the 480 GB drive can be had for $199.99 ($0.42 per GB).

With the ever-growing security concerns some people have, it might be worth noting here that Mushkin designs and assembles their drives in the U.S.A. It is up to the individual user what they prefer in the direction of manufacturing locations, but it’s great to see companies giving us the option to choose.

I noticed that a lot of retailers haven’t labelled the new drive as G2 but rather just as Mushkin Chronos. You can however spot the difference in the product number as all the new drives end in “-G2”, for example MKNSSDCR60GB-G2 .

Thank you Mushkin for providing us with these information

Image courtesy of Mushkin

Mushkin Reveal New Stealth and Redline 2800MHz Memory Kits

Mushkin has just announce two new additions to its series of memory modules. They have added a variety of 2800MHz memory kits for both the Stealth and Redline memory series. These will come in DDR3 4GB, 8GB and 16GB kits with 12-14-14-35 latencies at 1.65 volts.

These new kits will be available all over the world through Mushkin’s distributors by the end of July or in early August. To get the full 2800MHz out of these new memory modules you’ll need to be using Intel’s latest Ivy Bridge or Haswell platform architectures which have powerful enough Integrated Memory Controllers (IMCs) capable of handling such high memory frequencies. Older platform architectures like Sandy Bridge(E) and most AMD platforms will struggle to operate at 2800MHz.

Mushkin claims great overclocking potential aided by their heatsink designs. The green PCB leaves much to be desired though. Pricing is TBA but don’t expect these to come cheap.

Image courtesy of eTeknix

Mushkin Announce 1.8-inch Chronos GO Deluxe SATA III SSDs

Mushkin are a company who make a lot of SSDs and memory kits for the PC hardware market. Their Chronos range of SSDs are renowned across the industry for the excellent value for money that they provide. Today Mushkin adds another addition to the Chronos series, the GO Deluxe.

You might be wondering what is different or special about these SSDs? If they were just like any other SSD we probably wouldn’t even give them the light of day on our website. What’s interesting about the Chronos GO Deluxe is that they fit into a 1.8 inch form factor, compared to the normal 2.5 inch form factor we find SSDs in.

Mushkin have managed to squeeze 120, 240 and 480GB capacities into this small 1.8 inch form factor. Mushkin claim the GO Deluxe drives are of enterprise quality, reliability and endurance but with the high performance you’d expect from a SATA III SSD.

Expected performance, pricing and availiblity wasn’t disclosed. However, we expect performance will be similar to any other SF-2281 Sandforce based SSD. Mushkin had this to say about their new 1.8 inch Chronos Go Deluxe

“Mushkin continues to push the envelope with higher performance, higher capacity and higher reliability products, and the new line of 1.8-inch Chronos(TM) GO SATA III (6Gbps) SSDs is just one example,” said Nicolas Villalobos, Director of Global Marketing at Mushkin Inc. “With these improvements, the new drives are very well-suited for professionals and for solution providers in demanding environments like digital signage, healthcare and point-of-sale.”

What do you think of this new 1.8″ SSD from Mushkin? Do you have any particular uses for an SSD this small?

Source: PR