Samsung Pay Users Best Avoid Rooting Their Phones

First you paid in coins, then you paid in notes, then you swiped your card and put in some numbers, now you don’t even swipe your card to pay with it. So what could be next for paying for everything? With the recent release of Apple Pay, the answer seems to be simple, your mobile phone.

Apple pay uses the same technology as NFC (Near field communication) based cards, this means that you can swipe your phone/card/tag and the card reader will receive the information from it, after just a few seconds of being in contact with each other. This means you can pay very quickly but it has raised some concerns, such as the fact that there is no check on who is using the card. Apple Pay addresses this by asking that when you swipe your phone you simply place your thumb on the fingerprint reader and it checks that you are authorized to use that card.

When money is involved people want to be safe, and during its trail run in South Korea Samsung Pay has given a few users a problem. The people involved all have one thing in common, their phones are rooted, a technique where you modify the operating system the phone uses, this means you can gain access to new features which are blocked by the system normally. Samsung pay doesn’t seem to like this and has been throwing up messaging warning users that they can’t use the app because “the system has been modified”. NFC payment systems, such as Google Wallet, tend not to care about rooting because they never physically handle the information about the payment, they just use tokens to point and share the required information.

Samsung Pay looks to accelerate the pace that Apple Pay has set, with not only the ability to pay in an NFC manner but also featuring another three letter acronym technology, MST (Magnetic Secure Transmission). MST enables you to use your phone to act as if you have swiped your card on a magnetic card reader, such as those found on a lot of payment terminals, this means that you could use Samsung Pay on devices and terminals which don’t support NFC, allowing stores all over to benefit from the latest addition to the payment methods roster.

Thank you Phandroid for the information.

Image courtesy of TheTechy. 

Club3D Multi Streaming Transport Hub and Docking Station Review

Introduction


There is no doubt that playing games and working is filled with a lot more joy and pleasure when you have more than one monitor connected. You need to use ALT+TAB a lot less to view everything, can have source code on one screen and the result on another, or just keep an eye on your instant messages and emails while you’re gaming. It’s all possible and once you got used to it, then you’ll miss it immensely when you don’t have it.

It can however end up costing you even more that you need a graphics card with just the right amount of outputs and connectors to match your monitor and this is where Club 3D comes to your rescue with two devices in the Sense Vision series. The MST-HUB is a multi-stream transport hub that morphs your one DisplayPort into three and the Y-cabled Docking station that takes one mDP and one USB 3.0 port and turns it into two mDP ports, three USB 3.0 ports, and one Gigabit Ethernet port.

The number of supported displays depends on the bandwidth available. The MST hub is using the ST Micro STDP 4320 which supports DisplayPort 1.2a specifications with support for up to 21.6Gbps of bandwidth. How much you have depends on your output device. With this kind of bandwidth at your disposal, you can easily run four full HD monitors at 60Hz and 32-bit colour depth and still have extra bandwidth to spare, and that from a single onboard connector.

The Club 3D MST hub can help with more, for example if you got a 4K monitor of the cheaper kind that only can do 30Hz. You can use the MST hub and resolve this by combining two screen resolutions of 1920×2160 at 60Hz to obtain a native 3840×2160 60Hz resolution by using two DisplayPort cables. This is particular useful of you only have one display port out to begin with and no way to attach two DisplayPort cables to your system, doesn’t help if the monitor has it.

Even if you don’t have a DisplayPort capable monitor the MST hub can help you, but you will need adapters to connect them. The Club3D MSTY Hub is a DP++ device which means that it can actively convert the DisplayPort signal to other types of display interfaces. An active adapter isn’t required, a passive is enough with this hub. Just keep in mind that passive adapters have a resolution limitation of 1920×1200.

AMD created Eyefinity with up to 6 displays, but Club 3d takes it to the next level as you only need a graphics card with two DisplayPort connectors and two of these MST hubs to achieve just that, being able to connect 6 monitors for the ultimate multi-screen setup.

Ultrabooks and notebooks also become more powerful with each generation, but the often only come with one display port. With the MST hub, you can easily connect multiple monitors to those and best of all, you only need to unplug one cable when you take your system with you on the go.

Features

  • Standards compliance/support:displayport v1.2a, displayport v1.1a,VESA DDM
  • Standard,HDCP V2.0,DisplayId,and EDID V1.4
  • Supports main link rates of 5.4 bps(HBR2),2.7 bps(HBR)and 1.62 bps(RBR) from source
  • Supports 1/2/4 lanes of main link for RX side
  • Supports three DP++ output port, or two dual-link DVI ports, or the combination of ports
  • For DP 1.2a source,supports DP1.2a MST multi video/audio steams
  • Supports 1.1 source, supports ViewXpand
  • Supports DP-DP Bypass mode
  • Supports AUX-CH enables SBM and I2C mapping over AUX between the source/sink and device
  • Dedicated I2C slave for main processor to access the device
  • Supported output resolution: up to 2560X1600@60Hz each monitor in DP1.2 MST and up to FHD/1080p in DP1.1 or DP 1.2 SST. With DP resolutions up to FHD (4K x 2K) @60Hz, 24bpp, but limited by DP bandwidth).
  • Input pixel data depth 6/8/10/12 bits and supports output pixel format RGB444
  • Advance WideEye SerDes technology
  • Adaptive Sync technology

Club 3D Display Graphics Products And Power Supplies At CeBIT 2014

While we love taking a look at the ultra-high performance ranges of graphics cards, it’s often easy to forget that their the play things of a small part of the market as your average consumer typically buys into the low and mid ranges. On Display are three mid range cards, the AMD Radeon 280X which has been treated to a new cooler, the R9 270 which now features the popular Coolstream cooler, great for reducing noise and temperatures when compared with the stock AMD offerings and the HD7800 series, which also features Coolstream and is still a popular choice for those wanting to power three displays via Eyefinity.

Further down the range we also have the entry-level cards and while they may not be power houses suitable for modern games, the HD 6450 series cards are perfect for HTPC users as they can operate multiple displays at high-resolution while operating completely silent, this also makes them perfect for professional or business computers. The Radeon R7 250 offers a little more power and features a semi-passive cooler while also being suitable for lower end systems, HTPC / Media centre builds and business use.

Also on display you’ll notice a wide range of adaptor cables, while they may not be the most exciting products on earth they’re still very important. Club 3D have been earning a solid reputation for their connectivity devices, especially their MST hubs while we discussed earlier today in an interview with Club 3D and having devices such as their DisplayPort hubs, as well as a range of connectors means you should have no issue hooking almost any display type or configuration into your Club 3D graphics card or similar compatible device.

Finally we have two of their new power supplies which come in semi-modular and non-modular formats, offering great value for money for the mid range markets and high end gaming markets. Club 3D were kind enough to spare us some extra time to talk about all of these products and their uses in yet another great video interview which you can check out below.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3OJ-AlCmagU&list=UUb9tDXXfM-REtXni2MOpwgA&feature=share&index=2[/youtube]

We’ve got plenty more coverage to bring you this week from CeBIT 2014, so stay tuned for even more updates from many of the top manufacturers at this years event.

Club3D SenseVision MST Hub CSV-5300 Review

Introduction And Feature Overview


The unique ability of the DisplayPort signal to be split into multiple streams is something that has been around for a while, namely since DisplayPort 1.1 compatible graphics cards have been on the market. AMD’s HD 5000 series were the first to offer multiple display outputs from a single DisplayPort but is very much limited by the low bandwidth of DP 1.1. In terms of DisplayPort innovations we haven’t really seen an MST hub from anyone up until now which has been quite sad.

Today we are looking something that isn’t exactly glamorous but fills quite a large hole in the market. Club3D’s MST (Multi Stream Transport) DisplayPort Hub is one of the first of those elusive MST hubs that allows you to split off a DisplayPort compatible graphics card output into any combination of resolutions that fills the maximum bandwidth of the link, the two links would be DisplayPort 1.1 or 1.2 aka HBR and HBR2. You can see full  bandwidth details below:

Most people will choose to use a trio of 1080p displays as these are currently the most affordable solutions on the market. This MST hub from Club3D does support Eyefinity but Nvidia surround does not work due to a lack of driver support from Nvidia, if and when Nvidia fix it the MST Hub will support it.

The ability to split a DisplayPort output into up to three displays of varying resolutions will also come in useful for mobile workstations where you need more display real estate but simply can’t get that in a mobile solution or when your graphics card supports more displays than it has ports. The Club3D MST Hub does require an external power source but uses only around 2.5-3.5 Watts.

The biggest rival to Club3D is the Matrox TripleHead2Go DP Edition but costing around £275+ this is mainly limited to the professional and business markets – most other people have made-do with other more affordable compromises and solutions. Club3D’s MST Hub on the other hand costs only around £90-100 making it about a third of the cost of its biggest rival and unlike the Matrox product the Club3D MST supports a higher overall resolution and more bandwidth over DP 1.2. This is compared to the maximum of 5760 by 1080 supported on the Matrox. It is also worth noting that the Matrox unit processes “on-chip” and sends the signal to the three monitors so isn’t capable of gaming, high frame rates or ultra high definition video playback whereas the Club3D MST retrieves the processing from the GPU so supports everything that the GPU would support.

The Club3D MST Hub, pictured above, serves a very functional purpose for desktop systems.  With the vast majority of graphics cards only having three to four display outputs, yet supporting 6 displays, the only way to achieve more displays than the number of ports is to use one of these MST hubs. We will be testing the Club3D MST hub’s capabilities in a triple display scenario through one port because unfortunately we do not have six displays or a second MST Hub.

Features

  • Standards compliance/support:displayport v1.2, displayport v1.1a,VESA DDM
  • Standard,HDCP V2.0,DisplayId,and EDID V1.4
  • Supports main link rates of 5.4 bps(HBR2),2.7 bps(HBR)and 1.62 bps(RBR) from source
  • Supports 1/2/4 lanes of main link for RX side
  • Supports three DP++ output port,or two dual-link DVI ports,or the combination of ports
  • For DP 1.2 source,supports DP1.2 MST multi video/audio steams
  • Supports 1.1 source,supports ViewXpand
  • Supports DP-DP Bypass mode
  • Supports AUX-CH enables SBM and I2C mapping over AUX between the source/sink and device
  • Dedicated I2C slave for main processor to access the device
  • Supported output resolution:up to 2560X1600@60Hz each monitor in DP1.2 MST and up to FHD/1080p in DP1.1 or DP 1.2 SST
  • Input pixel data depth 6/8/10/12 bits and supports output pixel format RGB444