Activision is Harassing a Modder After He Reveals Odds of Drops

Call Of Duty is one of the biggest franchises in the gaming world, with releases year after year from no less than 3 developers now. With so many games it comes as no surprise that their modding community is quite active as well, bringing new maps and options to gamers all over. One modder seems to have caught the developers eye resulting in claims that Activision are harassing a modder over some of his content.

In the Reddit post, moderator and modder TheReal_DF (DecrypterFixer), explains how much of a fan he has been, especially of the zombie survival mode. Recalling everything from his average of wave 45 in the zombie survival mode and how he got into the game mode only to then discover the mysteries of easter eggs within the game. Being interested in programming TheReal_DF decided to have a look and see how the game (Black Ops 1) worked.

TheReal_DF even says that the game helped him better at reading assembly language, a skill which eventually got him his dream job. That’s where the post goes south, describing the game as something that no longer represents what he “loved”.

In a follow-up post by chefslapchop, it’s revealed that “Activision has been harassing him legally him exposing the annals of their micro transactions and creating offline mods”. If this isn’t clear he then goes on to point out that in particular Activision dislikes that TheReal_DF has been “trying to find the exact odds of supply drops so people know what they’re spending money on”.

So a community loses a great person, a modder, all thanks to a company “harassing” him over offline content (not even stuff that affects people online, unlike the many hackers that exploit the game) and the fact that he wants to help people understand and make better decisions in the game.

Do you agree with this? Who’s side are you on? Is Activision right to be upset someone is looking at and learning from their work or should we all have the right to learn and enjoy games without the companies that create them trying to bully and scare us from their communities?

Reddit’s Technology Community Takes A Beating

Reddit is a huge community made up of thousands upon thousands of subreddits, and given that the website often claims the (self-given) title of being “the front page of the internet”, drawing around 110 million unique visits last month alone. So when something rocks that community, it can make a pretty big wave for its users and those who rely on those communities as a source of traffic and / or as a source of entertainment.

Out of the default subreddits there are but a few dozen default subreddits, this honour is bestowed on the best and most popular sections of the site, meaning that you’re automatically subscribed when you open a new account, or that the content from that sub is shown in the front page news feed for users who are not logged in, casual visitors if you will. However, due to recent actions of the moderators, Reddit.com have stepped in and removed /r/technology from the list of default subreddits. A similar action was taken against /r/politics a while back and visitor figures plummeted and any sites linked there also saw a big reduction in traffic, so this is a pretty big deal given that /r/technology is one of the most popular subs around.

Some of the moderators of the sub were using software to filter our keywords and remove stories, a common thing on many websites and especially on Reddit, but it’s the lack of transparency on the matter that raised some eyebrows. The AutoModerator bot was culling any content that contained the words anti-piracy, SOPA, NSA, Snowden, Bitcoin, CEO and more, meaning huge amounts of content were being filtered away, despite the obvious technology related nature of the topics.

“The mods directly responsible for this system are no longer part of the team and the new team is committed to maintaining a transparent style of moderation.” said Pharnaces_II, one of the subs community moderators.

“If you (/r/technology) can manage to look past your petty squabbles, add new moderators (there needs to be a significant increase in active mods), and function as a team we might consider adding you back.” added Reddit in relation to the banning.

The tool has been tweaked, the configuration page has been made publicly viewable and most of the moderators have been given the boot, with the ones remaining posting “We messed up, and we are sorry”. Unfortunately the whole situation seems too little too late and the community has been dealt a massive blow by the owners of Reddit. It’s going to take a lot of effort to repair.

Thank you Engadget for providing us with this information.