Linksys Introduces New Modem Router and More DD-WRT Support

Linksys is one of the biggest manufacturers of routers and network equipment in general, but that doesn’t mean that there isn’t room for a more devices as well as room for improvement on the current lineup. Linksys’ new modem router is the X6200 and it is a combined cable and ADSL/VDSL dual-band WiFi model.

The Linksys X6200 supports pretty much any connection you can have from static RJ45-based over cable to DSL connections and I wouldn’t be one bit surprised if you could use the included USB 2.0 port to attach a 3G/4G/LTE modem too. While it can connect to pretty much any type of internet connection, the built-in cable modem might be the selling point for this router. The internet connection speed has gone up and up, but a lot of cable modems lack the capability to handle the fast speeds your provider is selling you, which in return means that you’ll get a worse experience than you should.

“There is a lack of knowledge when it comes to cable modems. Consumers have cable modems or gateways that don’t match the cable broadband subscriptions they are paying for – thus getting slower speeds and frustrating experiences,” said Justin Doucette, director of product management, Linksys.

The Linksys X6200 isn’t the fastest wireless router, but the speeds of 300Mbps on the 2.4GHz band and 433Mbps on the 5GHz band should be sufficient for any internet usage. The modem router also features four RJ45 LAN ports for that direct Gigabit Ethernet connection that will provide you with the best connection. As previously mentioned, the X6200 also features a USB 2.0 port that can turn your USB drive into a network attached storage device.

The new Linksys X6200 modem router will be available in March 2016 for an MSRP of £79.99 and also has more advanced features such as parental control and guest access.

Feature highlights

  • One VDSL/ADSL2/2+ port, Annex A – RJ-11 port
  • One Gigabit WAN port with auto MDI/MDIX sensing (RJ-45) for Router functionality
  • Four Gigabit Ethernet ports
  • One USB 2.0 port
  • Supports VPN pass-through with IPSec, PPTP, and L2TP
  • Supports logging for incoming and outgoing traffic
  • DHCP server for LAN
  • Supports Universal Plug and Play (UPnP)
  • IPv4/IPv6 dual-stack support
  • DSL Modem supports ITU G992.5 ADSL2+ Annex A, L, and M and VDSL G.993.1 and ITU G.993.2 standards

At the same time as Linksys introduced us to this new modem router, they also announced an expansion of DD-WRT support among their existing routers. The support now includes the WRT1900AC, WRT1200AC, and recently released WRT1900ACS Dual-band Gigabit Wi-Fi routers.

 

ARRIS Cable Modems Have “Backdoor in the Backdoor”

Up to 600,000 ARRIS cable modems could be vulnerable to hacks via a “backdoor in the backdoor”, according to security researcher Bernardo Rodrigues. Rodrigues, who works as a vulnerability tester for the Globo TV network in Brazil, revealed on his blog that he had “found a previously undisclosed backdoor on ARRIS cable modems, affecting many of their devices including [the] TG862A, TG862G, [and] DG860A [models].” After extending his search, Rodrigues found that up to 600,000 ARRIS modems could be affected by the vulnerability.

Using the default username and password of “root” and “arris”, respectively, Rodrigues was able to SSH through a hidden HTTP admin interface, where he found a system-spawned ‘mini_cli’ shell which, given the right password, would allow him into a restricted technician shell. Rodrigues cracked the ARRIS password of the day, which was generated via the last five digits of the modem’s serial number.

Rodrigues even built a Puma5 Toolchain ARMEB to help demonstrate how the backdoor operates, which he has kindly hosted on Github. He has reported how he accessed the “backdoor in the backdoor” to the vendor, which asked that he not reveal the algorithm he used to generate the password of the day. He waited until the issue had been fixed before posting his exposé. It took 65 days for the vulnerability to be corrected.

TP-Link Archer VR900 AC 1900 Wireless Dual Band Gigabit Modem Router Review

Introduction


For today’s review I am taking the TP-Link Archer VR900AC 1900 Wireless Dual Band Gigabit VDSL/ADSL Modem Router for a spin in our test area to see how well it performs, it surely sounds like a great device. While the Archer VR900 looks very similar to the Archer C9 that we reviewed not long ago, it’s quite the different device and it also sports some general improvements over the C9.

Most noticeable is the built-in modem that allows you to connect it directly to your phone line when using that sort of connection. There is no need to keep the old modem around and couple a router on the back of it in order to gain the features and functionality you want; The Archer VR900 does it all. It supports all current ADSL as well as VDSL formats right out of the box.

TP-Link didn’t just stop after adding the DSL modem to the VR900, they also made sure that it will work with pretty much any connection. At some point, and as it becomes available in more and more regions, there is a good chance that you’ll switch from your DSL line to a more modern Fibre optical connection. When you do so, you don’t need to replace the VR900 with something new as it also supports a direct WAN connection via the fourth LAN port. But once again, TP-Link weren’t satisfied with the connection options, so they made sure that you’re also able to connect it to 3G or 4G/LTE network via a USB dongle and the two onboard USB ports. All in all, there isn’t much that this router can’t do and connect to.

The TP-Link VR900 is an AC1900 dual-band router, meaning it can perform with up to 600Mbps on the 2.4GHz band and up to 1300 Mbps on the 5GHz band for a combined throughput of 1900 MBps. It has a great coverage thanks to the three 5 dBi omni-directional antennas. The wireless range and performance is further enhanced thanks to the beamforming technology that is applied on both wireless bands.

Inside the router is a 1GHz dual-core processor that makes sure that you don’t encounter any bottlenecks as the router has to perform its tasks.

The wireless bands feature the normal 64bit and 128bit WEP, WPA, and WPA2 encryptions for secure connections and the WPS button makes connecting devices as easy as it can be. The software parts feature everything from Wireless MAC filtering, QoS control, NAT Firewall, VPN, Virtual server and Port Triggers, as well as any other function you could want from a router. Guest networking and parental control is also present and both are great features to have around.

Specifications

Packaging and Accessories

A great router like this also deserves a beautiful wrapping and TP-Link delivers that. The Archer VR900 has a simple yet very beautiful package. The front shows the device itself as well as providing all the basic feature information.

On the rear of the package, we find more details about the specific functions as well as a comparison table with other TP-Link devices. That way it’s even easier to pick just the right model when you’re visiting your local tech shop and have them all in front of you.

Inside we find everything we need to get it set up. The router itself and a power supply for it, two RJ11 cables and a splitter for your DSL connection, an RJ45 LAN cable, and the three detachable antennas as well as a quickstart guide and technical references.

NETGEAR Announces Nighthawk X4S Router

NETGEAR has announced its latest flagship VDSL Router which features a dual-core 1.40 GHz processor and integrated DSL modem. Impressively, the device utilizes the first to market Wave 2 WiFi technology with Quad-Stream on both bands as well as Multi-User MIMO-capability. The Nighthawk X4S AC2600 WiFi VDSL/ADSL Modem Router (D7800) offers impeccable wireless, wired and USB performance whilst being backwards compatible with 802.11 a/b/g/n devices. In terms of its maximum quoted speed, the router can produce up to 2.53Gbps (AC2600 WiFi = 800Mbps+1733Mbps) wireless and Gigabit Ethernet speeds. David Henry, vice president of product marketing and engineering, NETGEAR Home Networking outlined the router’s appeal:

“If multiple people in your household are streaming HD Internet content at the same time, it’s very likely that the DSL modem router you get in your subscriber service package is not capable of supporting your bandwidth needs,”

“With the Nighthawk X4S AC2600 WiFi VDSL/ADSL Modem Router, you’ll take advantage of the fastest processor in a DSL modem router combined with the latest innovations in wireless technology for the best experience you can get today for streaming, gaming and file sharing.”

The router also employs Dynamic QoS prioritization which helps to optimize network traffic. Another neat inclusion is the NETGEAR ReadySHARE Vault software which makes automatic backups to any hard drive connected to the router. In terms of security, the router is protected by leading wireless protocols, has VPN support and allows you to setup a free URL to create your own private FTP server.

When it comes to pricing, the Nighthawk X4S will retail at an MSRP of $529 (AUD), £269 (GBP) and €299 (EUR). Currently, the device is available throughout Australia and coming to Europe in mid-September.

Thank you TechPowerUp for providing us with this information.

Tenda D301 Wireless N300 ADSL2+ Modem Router Review

Introduction


Once in a while I get a product in for review that isn’t the newest and today is one of those times. I’m taking a closer look at Tenda’s D301 ADSL2+ Wireless Modem Router. This isn’t one of those routers one would run out and buy, but it could very well be the one your internet service provider is giving you.

The feature with the Tenda D301 is that is a combination of modem and router in one, effectively giving you an ADSL 2/2+ modem with router functionality and 4-port switch in one device. This certainly beats having both an ADSL modem and a router next to each other.

It comes with two external 5dBi antennas and supports MIMO technology that uses signal reflections to reduce dead spots and provide better wireless performance, coverage, and transmission rates.

The security part is covered pretty well with port filter, URL filter, and MAC filter. The wireless connection can be encrypted with a 64 to 128-bit WEP, WPA, or WPA2 password. Speaking of wireless, the Tenda D301 Wireless Modem Router only provides the 2.4GHz band with a transfer rate of 300Mbps.

IPTV is also supported on this router and it comes with a built-in USB 2.0 port for easy file sharing from flash drives to all connected devices, that could be both PCs and mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets.

The four LAN ports are only 100Mbps, but that isn’t all to bad when you think about it. If you only got an ADSL connection and only use the network to connect to the internet, then you don’t need any more. The fourth LAN port doubles as a WAN port when used as just a router and the first LAN port has built-in functionality for IPTV. VLANs are supported and so are virtual servers and PPPTP, L2TP, and IPSec VPN pass-throughs.. It supports Dynamic IP, Static IP. PPPoE, and IPoA internet connections.

You get individual LEDs for every port and function as well as a 6000V lightning protection that will help to protect connected devices from overcurrents in case the installation should be the victim in a thunderstorm.

Key Functions

  • ADSL2/ADSL2+ Modem, Router and 4-port Switch in one
  • IPTV support
  • USB Sharing
  • Lightning Protection

Packaging and Accessories

The packaging looks like what those of most routers do. An image of the device on the front as well as a basic summary of the key functions.

On the rear of the package, you find a little more information about what it does, where you could connect what and all that in several languages.

Inside the box, we find an RJ45 LAN cable, an RJ11 cable, and an ADSL splitter as well as the power supply unit. There’s also a manual disk with a user guide and setup wizard for quick installation and a printed quick install guide.

Netgear Launched the Nighthawk AC1900 WiFi VDSL/ADSL Modem Router

Netgear expanded its family of Modem Routers with the new Nighthawk AC1900 WiFi VDSL/ADSL Modem Router (D7000) with dual band WiFi and Gigabit Ethernet.

The D7000 has an embedded DSL modem supporting ADSL/ADSL2/ADSL2+ and VDSL/VDSL2 speeds supporting even the fastest lines with its gigabit WAN port. Inside it is powered by a dual-core 1GHz processor and sports the best WiFi speeds and great coverage range. It is also the first AC1900 VDSL Modem Router to offer two SuperSpeed USB 3.0 ports for faster connections and twice the USB storage access.

The Nighthawk delivers incredibly fast wireless speeds of up to 1.9Gbps (AC1900 WiFi = 600+1300Mbps) and wired Gigabit Ethernet speeds. High-powered amplifiers, three external antennas and Beamforming+ improve range and reliability to extend coverage and reduce dead spots even in very large homes.

The two USB ports support Netgear’s ReadySHARE, allowing you to easily share both printers and storage over your entire network. It also comes with the Netgear Genie app that helps you to setup and manage your router as well as Netgear MyMedia for DLNA streaming and AirPrint for your iPad and iPhone.

All the basic routing functionality is also covered from scheduling to security, port forwarding and virtual servers, and everything else you’d want from a router.

The Netgear Nighthawk AC1900 WiFi VDSL/ADSL Modem router is available now throughout Europe, Asia and Australia for an MSRP of €229.99 and will be available early fall in the U.S for an MSRP of $249.99.

NETGEAR Launches New AC1900 WiFi VDSL/ADSL Modem Router

NETGEAR has introduced their newest router, the NETGEAR D6400 AC1600 WiFi VDSL/ADSL Modem Router with dual-band Gigabit. The new D6400 is designed for larger homes and home environments supporting 10 or more devices such as smartphones, notebooks, tablets, laptops, computers, smart TVs, gaming consoles, and Blu-ray players.

The new AC1600 Modem Router provides a built-in fast VDSL modem for broadband that is also compatible with ADSL2+ connections. It comes with both Gigabit Ethernet WAN and LAN ports and also offers future upgrade abilities to fiber or cable. The AC module can deliver up to 1.6Gbps (AC1600 WiFi = 300+1300Mbps), perfect for both the newest and somewhat older devices.

“We developed the AC1600 Modem Router, the first in a series of new VDSL products, in response to consumers who now have extremely fast DSL broadband service but demand better in-home WiFi performance,” said Doug Cheung, senior product line manager for NETGEAR DSL Products. “You expect your in-home WiFi to deliver that faster broadband speed to the farthest reaches of your home, but are disappointed and frustrated that the modem router supplied by your Internet provider isn’t the latest WiFi technology. You want something faster, with better range, and which supports more devices. Our AC1600 WiFi VDSL/ADSL Modem Router does exactly that.”

NETGEAR’s router app called Genie is already enjoyed by more than 5 million customers and the dashboard like interface makes it easy to install, monitor, control, and repair your home network. You can easily access your home network, view the network map, check bandwidth usage, block WiFi devices, set up guest WiFi, and manage parental controls for safer web surfing, anytime, anywhere, all through the app. Another useful side on the D6400 is the NETGEAR MyMedia feature that enables you to find and play your stored media files from anywhere on your network to your DLNA-ready TVs and music systems. You can also make any printer AirPrint compatible for printing from an iPad or iPhone.

With two built-in USB ports, you can easily attach both USB drives and printers as previously mentioned and share them over your network. The NETGEAR AC1600 WiFi VDSL/ADSL Modem Router launched initially in Australia at the end of March, and will launch in Italy and the UK this April for an MSRP of €159.00/£149.99.

Thanks to NETGEAR for providing us with this information

Mobile Power Consumption – Attention Turns to Network Connections

In today’s fierce market, manufacturers have designed ever more power efficient processors and displays; this has resulted in attention being turned to another of the most power-hungry components, the modem.

“The modem is, without a doubt, one of the most crucial parts of the smartphone in today’s connected society. With 4G LTE, users consume orders-of-magnitude more data than with 3G. Increased consumption, paired with the advent of cloud technologies, requires that smartphones always be connected to the network—always sending data back and forth. As a result, the modem and RF frontend have become pivotal components of the smartphone in enabling connectivity and doing so without impacting battery life.”

Coinciding with becoming more efficient, modems also strive to become more powerful, something that typically doesn’t go hand in hand without innovative leaps in technology, similar to new nano-processes in processors.

Moor Insights & Society have published a research paper delving in-depth into throughput, power consumption and antenna tuner capability offerings from Samsung and Qualcomm; this research paper can be found here.

Thanks to Moor Insights & Society for sharing this information with us

Eero to Kill WiFi Dead Spots in the Home With it Mesh Network

A San Francisco startup is aiming to banish WiFi dead spots in the home, without using WiFi extenders, with its new product, Eero. Instead of using one single router, Eero uses mesh networking to link a number of smaller devices – according to the company, three should cover the average-sized house – around your home.

The first Eero is connected your existing router or modem, which can then be linked with any further Eero devices placed around the home. Each device contains dual Wi-Fi radios for 2.4GHz and 5GHz connections, Bluetooth 4.0, 1GHz processor, 512MB RAM, and 1GB of storage. The devices can be controlled via Android or iOS app.

Nick Weaver, CEO of Eero, told The Next Web that the project was prompted by the question, “what Wi-Fi system can we design that will provide connectivity to any sized home?”

A pack of three Eero devices cost $299, with one priced at $129.

Source: The Next Web

Dial-up Internet Still Alive and Thriving

I’ve thought for a while that dial-up internet was dead, with maybe just a couple of hundred subscribers here and there. So did most of our readers probably. But I was mistaken and corrected in that when I read the AOL financial report.

At the end of June 2014, AOL had 2.3 million subscribers to their dial-up service, each paying an average of $20.86 per month. Without any advertising costs or investment into a new network and services, it is almost pure profit. AOL made a staggering $155 million last year on this service alone. In comparison their ads service only made $144 million last year.

It is being speculated by experts in the industry that many of these subscribers aren’t aware that they’re still paying for this stone-age service. A lot might also think that the dial-up is required to have, for their new high-speed broadband to work.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1npzZu83AfU[/youtube]

The service has a surprising long life that probably can be attributed to the colossal marketing campaign run in the 90s. Millions and millions of free CDs were sent out to every household across the U.S., and many other countries.

A couple of years ago, former AOL product manager Reggie Fairchild revealed that their campaign took up the entire worlds CD production for several weeks during the launch of AOL 4.0 in 1998. “Think of that,” wrote Fairchild. “Not a single music CD or Microsoft CD was produced during those weeks”.

Just reading the words dial-up, the modem-sounds start to play in my head. A sound I’m not missing at all, but if you want to experience it again or are to young to remember, you can listen to a harmless version on YouTube.

Thank you Independent for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of America Online.