Seagate Announce Five New Business NAS Systems With Up To 30TB Storage On Offer

Aside from desktop and enterprise hard drives and SSDs, not many people are aware that Seagate also have a NAS product line that covers every market sector including the SMB market. With the recent announcement that they are updating their NAS hard drive lines to include 5 and 6TB models, Seagate have updated their NAS line with two new products for the SMB market.

The new NAS range includes five systems which are built for environments with up to 50 users and with capacities and prices ranging from £199 for 2TB of storage up to £1,839 for a six bay 30TB system. The five units are broken down into groups known as Seagate NAS and Seagate NAS Pro.

The cheaper NAS line feature two and four bay systems with capacities of up to 16TB based around a Marvell 1.2GHz dual-core CPU, 512MB RAM, with two USB 3.0 ports and dual Gigabit LAN topped off with Seagate’s own OS 4 NAS operating system.

The second line which caters for the higher end of the SMB market is known as NAS Pro and this line coincides with the debut of Intel’s latest C2000 dual-core processor clocked at 1.7GHz. Sat alongside the C2000 CPU, Seagate pack each NAS Pro system with 2GB RAM, two USB3.0 and one USB2.0 port, dual Gigabit LAN and their latest NAS OS 4 operating system.

There is no work on when the systems will be available to buy at this moment in time, however full details on the two system lines can be found over on Seagate’s website: Seagate NAS & Seagate NAS Pro.

Source: Press Release

 

Blogging Platform “Medium” Gets Out Of Closed Sign-Up

Medium, a blogging platform founded by Twitter co-founder Evan Williams, has been a closed sign-up based app up until now. Today, the platform sent out an email with the news that anyone can now sign in and start writing. There are a few requirements set out to sign up and use Medium however. You must be writing from Chrome, Safari or Firefox browsers, and you must have a Twitter account to post. There’s a verification link sent via email that you click on and then you’re in. Posting apparently is still not available from mobile devices.

So what’s the story behind Medium? TechChurch had Williams tell them about his vision of the app:

“I think more people would be in a better place if more people shared their ideas,” says Williams. Seen this way, Medium is just the next logical step in Williams’ three-product cycle to inject better ideas into the world. Blogger helped open the doors for pajama bloggers to compete with the media moguls. A few years later, Twitter gave the power of broadcast distribution to everyone who had 140 characters to share.

Now, to complete the circuit, Medium wants to make viral information more substantive — the hope in the Pandora’s box of communication. “It’s also an optimistic stance to say that we can build a system where good things can shine and get attention. And there’s an audience for ideas and stories that appeal to more than just the most base desires of human beings.”

Medium has managed to gain some relative popularity among a sea of other blogging alternatives, but not always for the best reasons. While there has been some interesting content, there have also been missteps like a false claim of government email snooping and Peter Shih’s ‘10 things I hate about San Francisco’ post. Topics like these have given Medium a rep for being an incubator for lack of self-awareness and inaccuracy. Still, Williams addressed those issues fairly plainly in his interview. Anyone interested in testing the Medium app can sign up here.

Thank you TechChurch for providing us with this information.
Images courtesy of TechChurch.

“Facebook Should Charge Users For Ad-Free Version” Says Twitter Co-Founder

Biz Stone recently let out a rather interesting comment on Medium, where he discussed his thoughts on Facebook and their advertising / free model, which is strange to say the least given that he is the co-founder of Twitter, essentially the alternative / rival for Facebook, but he shared his business advice non the less.

“In general, the ads on Facebook don’t seem particularly useful or engaging. However, ads on the service are universally tolerated because that’s what makes Facebook free and free is nice.

Anywhoo, now that I’m using it and thinking about it, I’ve got an idea for Facebook. They could offer Facebook Premium. For $10 a month, people who really love Facebook (and can afford it), could see no ads. Maybe some special features too. If 10% percent of Facebook signed up, that’s $1B a month in revenue. Not too shabby.”

This idea has been floating around for a while but personally I can’t see it happening, Facebook is big for a reason and that reason is that it is free, I often find that once a premium option becomes available for a site or service, the “free” edition starts to taste bitter in a push to make you upgrade, eg; more adverts than ever before on the Free version once the premium option is in place.

It’s interesting that he would suggest this though, but since Stone is no longer at Twitter we can only assume that both Facebook and Twitter will remain free for the forseeable future.

Thank you Mashable for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of Mashable.