Boris Calls Out Uber For “Breaking The Law”

Boris Johnson, the mayor of London, is known for a lot of things, from his wacky antics to the ‘Boris’ bikes that you can ride around London. He has even pledged that London will have 5G by 2020. This time, his words were a little less welcoming and was targeted at a common form of transportation, Uber.

Boris Johnson has a weekly column in the Telegraph and this week it would appear he has used it to defend the classic sight of black London taxi’s and this week he has gone on the offensive.

Johnson is the chairman of Transport for London and has often spoken about the transportation within London. In July, Johnson stated that Uber drivers would need to pass a knowledge test to be able to work in London, but his more recent comments state that the law is clear and that only hackney carriages (the other name for black cabs) can be hailed on the streets.

Another possible area for discussion is that only black cabs can operate with a taxi meter, meaning that fare calculating apps like Uber technically breach this law. Either way, Transport for London are looking at amending the law regarding taxi’s to help clarify systems like Uber, from their rights and responsibilities to outlining just how they can operate within cities like London.

Are you a Uber user? Do you think that Uber should be held to the same standards as a taxi company?

Thank you Ars Technica for the information.

Thank you BBC for the image.

London to be 5G Enabled by 2020 Promises Boris

Mayor of London Boris Johnson has pledged that London will roll out their 5G network across the city by 2020, something that could give the city a massive economic boost and put it ahead of many other parts of the world in terms of technological infrastructure.

5G is a performance hammer blow compared to 4G, which looks like dial up in comparison, using around 10Gbps (that isn’t a typo) it aims to throw internet at mobile devices faster than ever before, as well as allowing huge numbers of connections that could really change the way we use the internet, especially given that the service will be faster than most wired connections, this could pave the way for more people to cut the cable from their desktop router.

The 5G standard still has a long way to go, as the final details are yet to be defined, but early tests are promising and all this stuff has to start somewhere! Of course it remains to be seen if Boris can uphold this promise, but with David Cameron visiting CeBIT earlier this year to secure the technology for 5G, it certainly looks like we’ll see something big in the next few years.

Thank you Engadget for providing us with this information.