Donald Trump Claims he Will Make Apple Start Building Computers in The US

Donald Trump is a divisive figure who seems to thrive on controversy. Whenever he voices any sort of xenophobic or racist remarks, his popularity increases. While there’s an ongoing discussion in the UK about banning Trump, you cannot overlook his ability to resonate with certain voters in the USA. The majority of Trump’s rhetoric revolves around making America great through nationalistic, patriotic speeches and decrying the current state of the USA. During a talk at Liberty University today, Trump made outlandish claims about Apple’s workforce and promised to bring employment back to US citizens:

“We have such amazing people in this country: smart, sharp, energetic, they’re amazing,”

“I was saying make America great again, and I actually think we can say now, and I really believe this, we’re gonna get things coming… we’re gonna get Apple to start building their damn computers and things in this country, instead of in other countries.”

Clearly, this is pure fantasy as bringing a huge amount of manufacturing jobs back to the US isn’t financially feasible. Apple is well aware they can acquire labour in the Asian market at a reduced rate, and maximize profits. While it’s possible for some jobs at the company to be created in the USA, Apple isn’t obliged to offer jobs to a specific nation. In all honesty, this is another political tool being used by Trump to try and emphasize his pro-American ideology. Whatever the case, Trump has become a laughing stock in many countries and his views are mocked all over social media platforms. This is exemplified by various internet memes and brief Vine clips.

Apple has rightfully received criticism for its tax avoidance and could face a hefty charge by the European Commission. On the other hand, the idea that someone running for president can suddenly bring the US workforce back to a company driven by profit is absurd.

Image courtesy of The Atlantic.

A Clearer Picture For Utilizing Transparent Glass Within a 3D Printer

I recently wrote an article concerning a new technique of using a 3D printer to build up layers upon layers with pre-existing materials to create “glass” based objects. The accompanied video looked stunning and the potential applications seemed endless, well now, a team of MIT researchers have opened up a new frontier within 3-D printing which has expanded on the premise with new details concerning the ability to print optically transparent glass objects.

The ability to print glass objects is extremely complex and has been attempted by other research groups, the problem lies with the extremely high temperature which is required in order to melt the material. Quite a few development teams have used tiny particles of glass which is melded together at a lower temperature in a technique called sintering. Unfortunately, this technique has rendered such objects to be structurally weak and optically cloudy, thus eliminating two of glass’s most desirable attributes: strength and transparency.

MIT have therefore developed its own process which retains those properties and produces printed glass objects which are both strong and fully transparent to light. The device which is used to print such objects utilizes a computer assisted program which is similar to the standard design operating mechanisms implemented by current 3D printers. The result is a machine which can print objects with little human interaction or indeed intervention; it’s stunning to imagine an autonomous production line in your living room.

In the present incarnation, molten glass is loaded into a hopper within the top of the device after being gathered from a conventional glass blowing kiln. When completed, the finished piece must be cut away from the moving platform on which it is assembled; the temperatures are the same of 1900 degrees Fahrenheit which is approx 1037 degrees Celsius.

The potential uses for such a technique is mind-blowing, Neri Oxman, an associate professor at the MIT Media Lab envisions a future whereby it would be possible to “consider the integration of structural and environmental building performance within a single integrated skin.” This notion could completely transform the manufacturing process.

A further expansion on this technique would be to add pressure to the system which is either through a mechanical plunger or compressed gas, by doing so it is hoped to produce a more uniform flow and thus a more uniform width to the extruded filament of glass.

There is a potential downside to such a revolutionary direction, if you could inhabit a world where houses are printed on an industrial scale and goods are quickly printed, this would ultimately reduce the number of workers needed within production. AI and new techniques are slowly making people redundant within an ever-expanding population, a quote below emphases this further

“Boston Consulting Group predicts that by 2025, up to a quarter of jobs will be replaced by either smart software or robots, while a study from Oxford University has suggested that 35% of existing UK jobs is at risk of automation in the next 20 years”.

What future will be printed for us humans?

Thank you mit and bbc for providing us with this information.

Europe Mismanages Disposal Of Discarded Electronics

A ticking timebomb is in the form of the correct way to dispose electronic waste, the globe is producing unit upon unit of the latest gadget which in turn pumps chemicals and materials into these devices. The turnaround from purchase to waste is even shorter than ever and protocols need to be implemented with the aim of recycling, which decreases the environmental impact on the plant as possible.

Unfortunately, A European Union Funded project in conjunction with Interpol, the United Nations University, United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute, the WEEE Forum, the Cross Border Research Association, Zanasi and Partners and Compliance and Risks has found rather poor statistics.

They have found in Europe, “just 35% (3.3 million tonnes of 9.5 million tonnes) of used (but still functioning) and waste electronics and electrical equipment discarded by companies and consumers in 2012 wound up in official collection and recycling systems”. What happened to 6.2 million tonnes? It’s not like companies made it disappear, (reads more information) OK it is like companies made it disappear as the rest of the waste was “either exported, recycled under non-compliant conditions or simply thrown in waste bins”.

Responsible manufacturing and consumers who buy these electronics need to bear in mind disposal when throwing away items. The raw materials are toxic, think chlorofluorocarbons in fridges or Benzene and n-hexane which are chemicals thought to cause cancer and nerve damage, not such a problem? These chemicals have been used in the production of Apple products up until 2014.

Of course, as this report illustrates, an unknown but damaging factor is the criminal gangs who thrive off the illegal waste supply chain in some countries. Disposal of electronic waste is essential considering the amount which is being manufactured with the ratio increasing year on year, hopefully, more can be achieved in this area to decrease humans carbon footprint on the earth.

Thank you economictimes for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of open-electronics

Foxconn to Replace More Humans With Robots

Foxconn, which is Apple’s primary supplier for components, expects to deploy more robots in their factories to help with production in the next three years. While human workers are the main resource in their factories today, the company expects to automatize 70% of its assembly line work.

The Taiwanese manufacturing plant currently employs 1 million workers in China. However, company CEO Terry Gou said that he has been investing in robotics research and hopes to one day deploy a “robot army” at the company’s factories to offset labour costs and improve manufacturing.

“I think in the future, young people won’t do this kind of work, and won’t enter the factories,” said Gou.

A while back, Foxconn has faced criticism regarding working conditions, long hours and harsh treatment from its employees and both Foxconn and Apple have promised to improve the labour conditions. The resulting outcome proves to be a good quality and production improvement, but the cost of achieving it would most likely displease Foxconn’s employees even more.

Despite the increase in automation, certain Foxconn facilities in China still heavily rely on human workers. The factory in Zhengzhou, China, assembling Apple’s iPhone for instance, has been known to employ 300,000 workers.

Thank you Computer World for providing us with this information

Rumoured Ultra-Slim MacBook Air to Enter Production in Early 2015

A new rumour from Digitimes suggests that alongside the Apple Watch, Apple’s latest upgrade to the MacBook Air is due to enter production in early 2015.

The report says that component production is well underway, with the intention of the product entering production in the next few months. The notebook is to be produced by Quanta Computer and will feature Intel’s Broadwell processors. Those processors are supposedly key to its design too – the new machine will apparently be even thinner than the current MacBook Air and will go without a fan as part of its fan-less cooling system.

The laptop is projected to be released in mid-2015, with limited supply at first due to yield issues. Apparently it will come in Space Grey, Silver and Gold, making them the first MacBooks with alternative colour options in years. The MacBook Air has been an incredibly popular product for Apple, becoming their most successful computer. Its design spawned Intel’s Ultrabook initiative, leading to a number of Windows-based notebooks following the same ultra-thin, SSD-based design.

Source: Digitimes Via: MacRumors

Samsung Invests $3 Billion in a New Vietnamese Manufacturing Plant

In an interesting move, Samsung have announced that they are to spend up to $3 billion on a smartphone manufacturing plant in Vietnam.

The new plant will join their existing $2 billion factory in the country, making the Korean giant’s presence in Vietnam even larger. There seems to be a rather noticeable shift in manufacturing from China to Vietnam, as Samsung’s plans add to Intel, LG, Panasonic and Microsoft’s expanded manufacturing presence there. It seems that it is becoming cheaper to manufacture in Vietnam over China, as tax breaks and very cheap labour make it very attractive to companies like Samsung.

Daniel Gleeson, a senior analyst at the IHS Technology consultancy told the BBC “In a way China is a victim of its own success – it’s becoming so successful as an economy that it’s becoming too expensive to do a lot of the manufacturing it used to attract”. It’s been observed that China is becoming more involved with the design and development of consumer technology devices, with the advent of companies like Xiaomi and Lenovo.

Source: BBC News

HP Seek 3D Printing Future With ‘Multi Jet Fusion’ Technology

HP are eager to be a big player in the 3D printing business, maybe so they can overcharge for the inks… just kidding. They’re eager to show the world their “Multi Jet Fusion” technology, which it believes can “change entire industries.”

The goal for HP, as is the goal for many 3D printing companies, is to make the process of 3D printing quicker, more accurate and more reliable. The new HP tech seems to do just that and HP have said they can make complex products such as gears at least 10x faster than conventional manufacturing techniques.

To show off the reliability and accuracy of their products, HP printed a product strong enough to life a car! Then they printed a part for their 3D printer, printed from the 3D printer the part was for just to show off the resolution; it worked. Maybe Stargate were right to fear the Replicators.

No word on pricing or if and when this technology will make its way to the consumer market, but manufacturers should start taking shipments in 2016.

Thank you Engadget for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of Engadget.

Print Circuit Boards Fast and Cheap With Squink

3D printing has proven a smash hit, with people using it to create prototype products and a multitude of cool and innovative things. However, they’re not well suited to creating electronic parts, so what can you do if you need a circuit board or other internal components for your new creations? Well that’s where Botfactory computer engineer Carlos Ospina comes in which his creation, Squink.

Squink is capable of printing a circuit board much in the same way a 3D printer makes models. Best of all it can do it in just a few minutes, it can do it for around $2 and it’s portable! Squink hit Kickstarter last week and within three days it has raised $84,000 of its $100,000 target.

It creates circuit boards by printing conductive ink onto specific materials such as photo paper and even glass, so while they may not be idea for putting into a final product, they’re ideal for rapid prototyping and testing of products that you aim to develop further.

The whole thing is still a prototype, but the Kickstarter is already gaining traction. If you’re interested in tinkering with electronics then this is certainly one type of printer you’ll want to keep an eye on. You can check out the official Squink Kickstarter page here.

Thank you TechCrunch for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of TechCrunch.

BMW 3D Printing Augmented Thumbs To Make Their Workers Stronger

While it is still a far cry from the augments we see in games such as Dues Ex, German car manufacturer BMW are using 3D printers to augment their car-plant workers. They’re creating special hand covers that give their workers augmented thumbs, making their hand stronger, something that benefits both BMW and the worker.

The 3D printed thumb support helps by reducing strain, allowing workers to fit certain car parts with greater ease and less chance of hurting themselves. Each thumb is specially created using a custom orthotic device and a portable 3D camera that measures the unique shape and size of each workers thumb, ensuring they get the perfect fit every time. The thumb guard is built up from thermoplastic polyurethane, a mixture of hard plastic and soft silicone that is formed using a 3D printing technique known as Selective Laser Sintering.

The cover locks into position when the thumb is raised, meaning it can’t move any further back and offers support through to the wrist, allowing a greater force to be applied without harm. This is thanks to the locking top panels that fold over themselves much.

The early trials have proved “very positive” with workers, prompting BMW to look into further augmented apparel for their worker to help boost productivity and prevent pain and injury to their workforce.

Thank you Guardian for providing us with this information.

Images courtesy of Guardian.

InWin Factory Tour Computex Part 3

Welcome back to our tour of the InWin factory in Taiwan, we’ve already looked at how InWin create their plastic chassis moulds and metal components in the last two parts of the tour. Now we move on to some of the finer details in the production line.

As you can see in the picture above, the panels are ran through a special spray painting machine which gives them the first part of the final finish. This is done in a sealed room and protective breathing gear must be worn while working here.

Once sprayed, the panels are laid out on trays to cool and dry, making them ready for the next step in production.

Some of the panels are also run through an oven to help seal and dry the paint work, and given that Taiwan is already a hot place, you can imagine it’s pretty hot here, we suspected it was around 45c and we were only there for a few minutes.

Our favourite feature of the factory wasn’t the cool products we saw, it was these air conditioning units on the wall, we spent way longer than InWin would have liked staring at this while enjoying the cool air it provided.

The final details of the builds require a more hands on approach, printing techniques are used to put logos and other designs onto chassis panels, each one done one at a time.

Smaller components require bigger production lines, allowing finer details and cleaning of parts such as the 5.25″ drive bay covers, buttons and front panels.

Once all the parts are complete, having gone through their extensive manufacturing processes, they’re bolted together. Here you can see a team of people screwing together the H-Frame mini.

A final few screws and a clean, they’re wrapped and placed in their boxes.

Leaving the final product ready to go to retail.

One of the super computers used to run the production lines, nothing major, but we love a good giggle at old computers.

Here you can see the two banks of tooling machines we saw in part 2, it’s a huge line up of machines at full speed we find that InWin can turn out around 1 million cases a month here!

All the products are then stacked up neatly, ready to ship out around the world for resale.

And here we see InWin loading up a fresh batch of the finished products. All of which were designed, manufactured and dispatched from this factory. From the smallest parts to the biggest panels, InWin do it all themselves and we’re very grateful they let us in to see how it all comes together.

InWin Factory Tour Computex 2014 Part 2

Welcome to part two of our InWin factory tour, we’ve already seen how they produce their tooling components and injection moulds to create the plastic components of a chassis, so what’s next? Well since some of the biggest parts of a chassis are the panels, which come in all kinds of shapes and sizes, but also consist of many other small metal components such as hard drive bays, motherboard backplate etc, you need a lot of big machines to create them.

CNC machines are a big aspect of this and InWin have some pretty powerful ones that offer a multitude of cutting techniques, although the most popular here is certainly the laser cutters such as the one below.

The CNC machine above is churning out metal components, which are then stacked in these bays ready to work their way further down the production line.

The cut panels are still in the early states, but if I’m not mistaken, these are going to become server chassis.

Further down we have some even more impressive CNC machines, these two giant cutters can perform 64 different cuts thanks to its huge tool bank, allowing it to produce complete components and several of them at any one time.

Here you can see one of the parts it has made, which looks like a hard drive bay before it has been bent into shape. The giant machine has used multiple tools at once to cut the multitude of shapes required for this design.

There are a lot of tools needed for each production run, which are all kept on hand here. Obviously there are a few missing, since they’re in the machines which are currently cutting.

Here are even more tooling components which are used as templates for chassis components, just like the moulds we say in the first part of the tour, they’re huge and heavy, even those used for small components are likely a 100lbs and above.

This is one of the technical aspects of the production line, metal sheets are folded in a press by an engineer. Each fold has to be lined up by hand and done one at a time, so more complete chassis designs can take quite a while to perform.

This was easily one of the coolest things on the tour, a simple metal sheet starts its life here and is picked up by the suction cups above, before being passed along to the machine on the left.

It is then drilled, stamped, pressed and beaten by one machine at a time before being passed onto the next one in this long line. Each has their own job to perform and the final component is put in a stack all the was at the end of this row of machines.

More tooling once again, this machine here is used to drill the motherboard screw holes into the motherboard back plate.

Smaller components require finer machines ad continual die stamping is used to create thing such as PCI slot covers, brackets and covers.

Metal roll is fed through the machine and literally stamps out the shapes and components needed.

Check out part 3 of the tour here.

InWin Factory Tour Computex 2014 Part 1

We’ve been very fortunate this week, as the eTeknix team were invited along to a special tour of the InWin factory in Taipei, allowing us a first hand look at every aspect of product design, development and production. InWin have proven themselves time and time again over the last few years with their special edition cases such as the H-frame and D-Frame, that they have a passion for engineering great products. So let’s get started and take a quick look at some of the aspect of how InWin produce these products.

The first room we entered was filled with high-end machines that construct and test various components. This included CNC equipment, an EDM (electrical discharge machine), laser measuring systems and more. In here they can create the various tooling components needed for moulds, presses, stamps and other manufacturing components required.

the laser measuring system checks the tolerances of a component against its intended specifications, as things need to be absolutely precise before going into mass production.

Multiple devices are required to complete the early manufacturing processes as some machine can cut edges, others can only cut rounded shapes and devices such as the wire cut can create perfect square edges, which when combined can produce the various components moulds and tools required for the production of a chassis.

Here you can see the tooling mould for a chassis, the lines down the left side of it are what will later for the PCI expansion slots on the back.

Each one of these components is a tool, used by the larger machines in the factory as a guide to cut and stamp out USB ports, audio jacks and other bumps, grooves and cuts; can also confirm they’re freaking heavy to hold too.

In the next room we have the next step in creation some of the incredibly complex moulds that are needed to create a PC chassis, right from the high-end models that InWin make, right down to their small budget and OEM models.

These two huge moulds way hundreds of pounds and are used in an injection moulding system to create the little chassis front panel you can see on display in front of them.

Again here we have two more huge moulds, these two are used to form that intricate little front panel cover you can see on the table.

There are often hundred of parts to each mould, taking a huge amount of engineering to create using the tools in this room, as well as the cutting and measuring equipment we saw in the previous room.

These moulds are huge and InWin have a huge amount of them stacked up and ready to go for each product they create, while also keeping older models on hand should they need to produce a revision or re-use components.

Two huge lines of massive machines use plastic, which is injected under high pressure and force into the moulds, then released down a conveyor belt to be prepared and stacked, ready for the next step in production.

The plastic used for the moulds starts out as simple plastic chips, any left over or waste plastic trimmed from the mould is later recycled back into these chips so that nothing is wasted.

We will be back very shortly with part 2 of the tour, stay tuned.

Update: Read part 2 here.

IBM Builds Graphene Circuit Boards, Sends Text Messages Faster At Lower Power Cost

Recent reports point to IBM creating a graphene-based circuit that they say performs 10,000 times better than existing options. It was reliable enough that they used it to send and receive a text message.

What is graphene? Simple. It’s an atom-thick sheet of carbon atoms renowned for its strength and conductivity. It is heralded as a possible alternative to silicon, which currently dominates electronics production. One of the major potential applications for graphene is transistors, which control the flow of electricity in circuits. The more transistors you can fit onto a chip, the more powerful it can be.

It is said that researchers should be able to pack far more atom-thick graphene transistors into a chip than the bulkier silicon alternative. Graphene also transports electricity 200 times faster than silicon. The IBM team integrated graphene into a radio frequency receiver, a device that translates radio waves into understandable information that can be sent back and forth. They tested it by sending a text message that read “IBM” with no distortion.

“This is the first time that someone has shown graphene devices and circuits to perform modern wireless communication functions comparable to silicon technology,” IBM Research director of physical sciences Supratik Guha said in a release.

The circuit announced today was made by adding the graphene only after the rest of the circuit was assembled, which means it is never exposed to the manufacturing steps that could damage it, having included three graphene transistors. The team is particularly interested in how the technology could be used in wireless communications systems, though graphene could be integrated into any silicon-based technology. Mobile devices would potentially be able to transmit data more quickly at a lower cost using less power.

Thank you GIGAOM for providing us with this information
Image courtesy of GIGAOM

Mass Production Of Carbon Nanotube Made Possible Thanks To Japanese Researchers

First of all, carbon nanotubes, or CNTs, are allotropes of carbon with a cylindrical nanostructure. Short version of the story, they are favorable materials in nanotechnology, electronics and optics for their unusual and extraordinary properties in terms of thermal conductivity, mechanical and electrical properties. You can read more about them here. The problem is that it’s hard to make them, and therefore mass production is impossible. Or at least it was.

AIST reportedly developed a way to properly manufacture single-wall, or monolayer, carbon nanotubes in quantities that are considered favorable for the eventual mass production. They have used a method called enhanced Direct Injection Pyrolytic Synthesis, or eDIPS, which aims to be a modified production phase based on the chemical vapor deposition used in the semiconductor industry to make thin film products and components. Meijo Nano Carbon Co. Ltd. provided the necessary industrial foundation for this system, and has moved forward to the development of a prototype production plant that demonstrates their method’s improved production rate and efficiency.

The report states that they were able to produce monolayers 100 times faster and with a quality rate of 10 to 20 times higher than before. This might not be so interesting for some of you, but let’s take a more practical approach on this matter. For example, Zyvex Technologies has built a 54-inch maritime vessel called the Piranha Unmanned Surface Vessel with the help of carbon nanotubes, which weighs only 8,000 lbs and has the capacity to carry a load of 15,000 lbs over a distance of 2,500 miles. And the use of carbon nanotubes does not stop at the vessel manufacturing industry. It is used in the manufacturing of wind turbines, car parts, sports equipment such as baseball bats, hunting arrows, surfboards, skis, and in many more manufacturing departments.

The mass production of carbon nanotubes will be an excellent breakthrough in terms of manufacturing goods and their use should have a significant increase in the quality as well. But the real question here is, will there be a breakthrough in terms of prices as well? We will just have to wait and see.

Thank you VR-Zone for providing us with this information
Image courtesy of USC.edu

New Graphene Manufacturing Method Inspired By Tree Frog Feet

Graphene is the cool kid in the world of materials, it’s incredibly strong and conductive, making it perfect for a wide range of applications, and especially good for electronic chips and solar cells. The only problem we have with Graphene is that it is hard to manufacture. When it was first discovered, the one atom thick layer of carbon was created using tape and pencil lead, now it looks like the humble tree frog’s feet may have inspired a new technique.

By adding the graphene to a silicon wafer the researchers were able to create circuits, among other things. This means they can not only grow, but also attached the graphene to the wafer in a single step, making the whole manufacturing process a lot quicker and easier, which hopefully in turn will also make it cheaper.

By using a copper based catalyst coating that allows the graphene to grow on the silicon disc, the researchers used bubbles to adhere it to the disc. They got the idea from the feet of beetles and tree frogs who use the technique to stick to submerged leaves. It’s a strange place to get their inspiration, but an effective one and the team is already working to extend their technique and see if it has commercial properties.

Thank you Gigaom for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of Gigaom.

Could We Break Moore’s Law? The Broadcom CTO Thinks We Will

Anyone who has spent some time in the computer industry will be familiar with Moore’s law, which states that the number of transistors on a computer chips doubles ever two years. This will in turn make them smaller, cheaper and more powerful, or will it?

We’re getting to a point now where the number of transistors we can fit on a chip via smaller and smaller manufacturing processes is reaching a theoretical limit, beyond which the laws of physics won’t allow the chip to function as transistors can only be made so small.

“We’ve been spoiled by these devices getting cheaper and cheaper and cheaper in every generation. We’re just going to have to live with prices levelling off.” said Henry Samueli, Chief Technology Officer at Broadcom

With demand for more and more chips each year, with greater performance, and technology to research and construct smaller and smaller chips, costs are inevitably spiralling and Samueli thinks that chips getting cheaper and cheaper has to stop at some point. He is absolutely right too. With Broadcom putting 15nm chips into production next year, and in  three generation’s time they’ll be working with 5nm chips. At 5nm the transistors will be just ten atoms wide, beyond that the laws of physics prevent further advancement.

“You can’t build a transistor with one atom. As of yet, we have not seen a viable replacement for the CMOS transistor as we’ve known it for the last 50 years,” said Samueli.

Moore’s Law will have to be broken, at some point in the near future chips will no be able to use smaller transistors and they won’t be getting cheaper, although I don’t doubt that they’ll still be getting more powerful.

Thank you Telegraph for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of Telegraph.

Apple’s New Supplier “Pegatron” Are Worse Than Foxconn Says New Report

Apple are shifting many of their contracts from Foxconn to Pegatron and while we all know that Foxconn don’t exactly have a clean record for how they treat their staff, Pagatron is said to be much worse.

Pagatron have been scrutinised for the conditions that are faced by its massive 70,000 strong work force. China Labor Watch, the US-based worker welfare monitor alleges that Chinese factories run by the Taiwan based manufacturer are “even worse” than Foxconn’s.

Lets keep in mind that child workers, high suicide rates, insanely long work hours, blackmailing workers by withholding pay, poor living conditions and more are just some of the issues that plagued Foxconn alone, so worse than that isn’t exactly a good place to start for Pegatron.

China Labor Watch claim that they have found many health and safety violations, poor living conditions in dorms, and the coercion of workers by withholding their pay or identity cards, all of which violate both Chinese law and Apple’s own supplier policy, yet it’s also reported that Apple are failing to treat abuses with the same urgency that it applies to lapses in product quality.

Apple claims that it has audited Pegatron facilities 15 times in six years, saying that a recent survey found Pegatron employees working 46 hours a week average. Saying they had dealt with ID cards being withheld and that the new reports claims are “new to us”, but the will be investigated thoroughly.

Thank you Engadget for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of CNET.