Library Management Software May Be Open to Ransomware Attacks

When it comes to software, schools are either on top of it or a little behind. The reason being is mostly the budgets they have to deal with, one piece of software that is often ignored by schools, which tend to have to work on the “if it isn’t broken we don’t need to replace it” policy, is the Library management software. If people are using any of Follett’s old library management software, they may want to change that approach and update soon as it’s been revealed that the software may be open to ransomware attacks.

The vulnerability was discovered by Cisco’s Talos group and found that users could remotely install backdoors and ransomware code to the JBoss web server element of the library management system, leaving users with either a large bill or no access to their libraries information.

Follett has not sat idly by with them already releasing a patching system to fix the flaws that expose the system and it even picks up any unofficial files which may have been snuck on to compromise the servers. Working with the Talos group, Follett is seeking to inform customers about the security risk and how to address the issue, potentially removing the threat and damage it could do before someone manages to make any money off of your local schools’ library.

Mad Catz In Trouble After Shares Plummet And CEO Resigns

Mad Catz is best known for creating various peripherals including keyboards, mice, headsets and more while adopting a very distinctive style. This gives their product range a unique aesthetic, and makes anything they produce instantly recognizable. Whether many of these complicated constructions are as comfortable as more simplistic solutions is topic up for discussion. Not only that, creating any mass market product involves a great deal of research and development. Furthermore, competition within the peripherals market is fierce with Corsair, Roccat, Logitech, Mionix, Cooler Master and more all vying for people’s hard earner cash. As a result, the financial situation at the company looks very bleak and their share value has fallen by more than 25% today!

On another note, Mad Catz announced some sweeping changes to the management team. Firstly, the company’s president and CEO, Darren Richardson resigned his position with immediate effect. In a similar fashion, the chair of the board of directors and member of the board’s audit committee, Thomas Brown resigned on Friday. That’s not the end though as Mad Catz’s senior vice president of business affairs, general counsel and corporate secretary, Whitney Peterson also handed in her resignation. The timing for the CEO’s resignation is quite worrying and comes just one day before Mad Catz’s financial reports are published. The company released a statement describing these changes which reads:

“We recognize the tremendous value that Thomas, Darren, and Whitney have brought to Mad Catz during their tenure and thank them for their many contributions throughout the years,”

“Looking ahead, we are confident that we have a talented leadership team in place that will enable us to steer the company on a steady course in its operations and financial performance as we look to grow our business and reward our shareholders.”

Clearly, the company’s financial standing is in disarray and I’m expecting the results to tomorrow to be alarming. Only time will tell if Mad Catz struggles to remain in business, but the picture so far doesn’t look very promising.

Have you had a positive experience with Mad Catz hardware?

Toshiba Records $4.5 Billion Annual Loss

Toshiba CEO was forced to resign after revelations came to fruition about the company’s management exaggerating operating profits by as much as $1.2 billion. Clearly, this has made a profound impact on their reputation among partners and consumers. According to The Wall Street Journal, The company is set to make a $4.5 billion annual loss with 7,800 jobs being cut as part of a large restructuring programme. Toshiba is having to make difficult decisions to try to restore faith in the company and rebuild once again. However, given their tarnished reputation, it’s impossible to know if they have a long-term future.

Out out the job losses, 6,800 are going from Toshiba’s customer electronics and applications department. Toshiba President Masashi Muromachi said about the upcoming financial period:

“We admit our steps toward restructuring were behind the curve,”

“The damage wouldn’t be this large if we had been able to implement overhaul plans much sooner.”

He also suggested that the company would “focus on businesses that can generate profits” and “consider withdrawals from unprofitable ones if a turnaround is difficult.”  This is an interesting statement to make and exemplifies how challenging Toshiba’s future is. It seems even the company’s CEO isn’t optimistic about the profitability of certain markets. This means is perfectly feasible for them to exit the consumer electronic sector to stay afloat.

Google Wants to Bring Order to Drone Airspace

Drones are becoming more popular than ever, but flying them around now poses a bit of a risk. This is why Google wants to bring order to low altitude airspace, namely the airspace below 500ft, so its Wing drones may be able to fly safely and avoid collisions.

Google proposed that all people operating a drone should send their location info back to the airspace access and collision avoidance. In doing so, air traffic control authorities then could pass on the information to private airspace service providers. This is how Dave Vos, head of the Wing project at Google, said it sees the future of drone control.

Vos said that private airspace control companies, which he calls ASPs, can manage these low airspace requests from anyone willing to fly drones around. In his vision, ASPs should be given a brief flight plan of drones who request take-off, which are evaluated based on other drone flight paths. The ASPs can then determine if flight path changes need to be made to avoid collision, or even deny requests based on how congested the traffic is in the area.

At this point, low altitude airspace is mostly left unregulated, so everyone with a drone or any other sort of flying contraption can make use of them. However, with Google, Amazon and other big companies starting to take an interest in drones and how they can use them in their daily business activities, low altitude airspace needs some sort of traffic management system.

But this also means that most people who want to fly their drone in parks or above their house will most likely be denied to do so once regulations are in place. So how comfortable are you with this decision? Do you think that a low altitude airspace management system is needed? Let us know!

Thank you PCWorld for providing us with this information

Uber Leaders Arrested In France

Uber has been in the news a lot recently. From having accounts sold on the dark net to being banned in countries due to its drivers behaviors. All of these have been large problems for a company which relies on the public not only using their app but also providing the cars for people to use. Today it all changed as two officials in Uber’s French branch were taken into custody.

Uber France CEO Thibaud Simphal and Uber Europe GM Pierre-Dimitir Gore-Coty were taken into custody in Paris today, this follows on from a raid that took place in its Paris office back in March. The two executives were charged with different allegations, the first of which being the running of an illegal taxi operation. This is a problem they have encountered in a few countries, with some debating if Uber can be considered a taxi service and others debating if their drivers are contractors or indeed employees.

The second allegation was concealing digital documents following on from the March raid, which in turn was slowing down the investigation.

France already has a strict stance on Uber, banning UberPOP (the equivalent of Uber in France) which allowed people to sign up and become Uber drivers without professional licenses. In response to this ban police have been issuing fines, these fines would be paid for by Uber.

So after being fined and possibly having their vehicles taken away they are still willing to drive for an app which considers them “contractors” (this avoids a lot of legal implications, such as providing health insurance in certain countries). After having two of its senior members taken into custody maybe Uber will have to rethink how it does business, or maybe France will have to go one step further and ban UberPop with a Justice Court ban on the service?

Thank you Tech Crunch for the information.