Quantum Computing Could Be A Step Closer Thanks To “Noise-Cancelling” Technology

Mention quantum computing to anyone involved with technology and their eyes will light up like its Christmas day. With the theoretical ability to complete thousands of complicated calculations in a fraction of the time that it takes the most advanced processor available on the market, quantum computing could see your phone becoming as powerful as your computer. While such a great concept the technology needed is far from complete, but maybe one step closer thanks to the recent work to incorporate noise canceling technology into their design.

Quantum computing relies on quantum bits, the problem being is the “noise” these bits encounter. The noise is normally in the form of magnetic disturbances, and if that computer is calculating your finances or the medicine dose you need you really don’t want someone putting a fridge magnet nearby messing it up. Researchers at Florida State University National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (MagLab) have instead decided to cancel out this noise using the quantum equivalent of noise-cancelling headphones.

Thanks to specially designed tungsten oxide molecules, MagLab were able to keep a quantum bit working without interference for 8.4 microseconds. While that may not seem like long, in the quantum world that time could calculate any number of operations and is a step towards making quantum computing a feasible technology for corporate and public use.

With the likes of NASA and Google working on creating a usable quantum computer, I for one am hoping that I get to see a quantum computer within the next twenty years. A single quantum computer could replace all the advanced servers and systems used by Google and Microsoft, offering us the ability to miniaturize our systems, creating even smarter systems in even smaller packages.

Samsung Start Shipping 15.36TB SSD Drives

Samsung is one of the key companies when it comes to providing memory to everything from your phone to your PC. With their latest revelation being the creation of a 256GB flash memory chip, it was only a matter of time before they made the news again. Today they’ve done just that by releasing to the public the 15.36TB SSD.

Stored within a 2.5-inch enclosure, the latest evolution of the SSD means all that more trouble for traditional hard drives which have slowly been losing out to the SSD’s, winning only on cost per GB (something that solid state technology has been catching up on quickly).

While it would be amazing to plug this drive into your computer or laptop, it may be a while before your everyday device can deal with this drive as it requires a 12Gbps SAS interface, with sequential read and write speeds going up to 1,200 MBps.

While it is currently being released with memory choices going from 960GB to the 15.36TB version, a 480GB version is expected to be released later in the year for those needing a little less storage.

Do you use an SSD? What would you store on an SSD of this size? With no price detailed yet, what do you expect this monster will set you back?

Image courtesy of Gordan Mah Ung.

SilverStone Wireless Upgrade Roundup Review

Introduction


It is one thing to buy a wireless network card and set it up, but a lot of the time you can improve the performance of these cards with a few aftermarket items. Today I’m taking a little look at some of the upgrade offering that SilverStone offers, the WAB1B Magnetic WiFi antenna base, the WAD17 7 dBi high-gain antenna, and the 9 dBi WA219 high-gain antenna.

An antenna base can help you with two things: Move the antennas to a more open space where it’s less crowded than behind your PC with all the add-in cards and cables running there. The second bonus is that you can move the antennas to a place where they will get a better reception than they would behind your chassis that’s possibly located under your desk. SilverStone’s WAB1B antenna base is also magnetic which allows you to place it on the side of things, such as your PC chassis if it is made of metal. This increases the placement options even further. To finalize the whole thing, SilverStone added gold-plated connectors at both ends to ensure the best possible signal transfer.

The included antennas might not be total to your liking when you buy a network card, for one reason or another. The most common reason to get aftermarket antennas is the higher performance that they offer over the mainstream and included antennas. Antennas with higher gain also come with an increased size as you can see on the photo below. The smallest antenna is the default antenna included with SilverStone’s ECWA1 PCIe card and the other two are the WAD17 and WA219 respectively.

The WAD17 is a dual-band antenna for use with both the 2.4GHz and the 5GHz band while the WA219 only is a single-band antenna for use with the 2.4GHz band. Both have their usage scenarios, so which you pick comes down to what you need. The long WA219 has a performance of 9dBi while the WAD217 has a performance of 7dBi, both quite a bit better than default 5dBi antennas, or worse.

SilverStone Releases Aftermarket High-Gain Antennas and Magnetic Base

Our routers and wireless network cards come with replaceable antennas, at least a lot do, and SilverStone released two new antennas and one magnetic Wi-Fi antenna base for the scenario that you’ll want to upgrade your existing antennas for performance or placement reasons.

The SilverStone WAD17, pictured above, is a high-gain MIMI 2T2R Wi-Fi antenna for improved wireless connectivity. It has a 5 dBi gain on the 2.4 GHz band and 7 dBi on the 5GHz bands which makes it a dual-band antenna. The Dipole antenna features a default SMA plug RP connector and has an impedance of 50 ohms.

The SilverStone WA219 2T2R high-gain Wi-Fi antenna is only for the 2.4 GHz band but comes with an impressive 9 dBi gain for that extra range and signal strength into the furthest parts of your home.

The SilverStone WAB1B is a circular magnetic base for SMA plug RP antennas and it has a 1.5-meter long cable for optimal placement. It allows you to place the antennas on a more optimal position than let’s say on the rear of your PC chassis which is placed under the desk. Having the antennas on top of the chassis or even the desk itself will greatly improve the Wi-Fi performance. Both the plug on the stand and on the cable are gold plated for optimal connection and the cable used is a low loss CLF 100.

All three new SilverStone Wi-Fi accessories are available now for a recommended end user price (excl. VAT) of $10.08 USD, $8.51 USD, and $8.51 USD respectively for the WA219, WAD17, and WAB1B.

Lenovo MIIX 700 – Simillar To Microsoft’s Surface Or Not?

Similar products have always been a problem for companies, with successful products quickly being copied and sometimes even rip off “cheap” versions of their products being offered to their customers by  rivals; Lenovo’s latest tablet, the MIIX 700, has some striking similarities with the Microsoft Surface.

A 12-inch tablet with a detached keyboard and built-in kickstand, the MIIX even shares the surfaces 3:2 aspect ratio, considered one of the more unique (and weirder) features of the Surface. The screen measures in at 2160×1440 resolution, weighing 0.06lbs lighter than the surface.

The MIIX will contain Intel’s Skylake processors, with 8GB RAM and a 256GB SSD, the MIIX will contain enough processing power to match tablets that are currently out on the market. Listed under its features, the advertisement for the MIIX states it is “recognizably different with a unique dual watchband hinge kickstand for those who value stylish design”. The watchband hinge was seen on the Yoga 3 Pro, but unlike its older counterparts can hold the stand in any position.

Looking at the design, and even the secondary magnetic strips on the product, even from a picture based view it is hard to not notice the surfaces glaring impact on the MIIX’s designs and functions. When it comes to products, is it the “works for them so it will work for us” approach allowed or do you feel that certain companies can take these similarities too far?

Thank you Ars Technica for the information.

Image courtesy of Windows Central.

Is Your Sony Charging Cable Genuine?

Recently, a charging cable has been released catered toward Sony products. The Chikou charging cable was originally thought of my most to be an official Sony product, brandishing a very similar design to their architecture and color schemes as we’ve seen Sony produce for years. Later on, Sony Taiwan released a statement to IT Home claiming that it was not an officially branded product.

Confusion was still wide-spread as Japanese branches of Sony were claiming through online portals that the Chikou charging cable was a Sony Mobile Authorized product and the production line quality was closely monitored by their servicing staff.

The cable was released with some impressive features, well as impressive as you can get for a cable. Featuring fire retardant materials and a magnetic connection to the phone to hold it in place, this cable can actually only be used with Sony products. It’s designed to clamp only to Sony products bodies, being measured and designed in this fashion.

We’re unable to come to a final answer as to if this is an official Sony product or not, but it heeds as a warning to those looking to buy any ‘official’ product. With so many knock-0ff and dodgy brands around these days, it’s hard to know if what you’re getting is actually genuine, or a cheap replica – or if there’s a third party company producing items (like in this case), is it actually approved by your products company?

If you’re looking for the always-safe option, go ahead and purchase directly only from your smartphone companies website. But, as with all ‘officially licensed’ products – expect to be paying a 200% premium.

Image courtesy of Chiphell