FFC To Create “Nutrition Labels” For Your Broadband

The Federal Communications Commission do a lot of things, including monitoring and investigating companies which have less than kind business practices. In their latest attempt to help people they’ve taken their inspiration from something we see (and ignore for the most part) everyday, nutrition labels.

In their latest attempt to give consumers a fair few the new nutrition labels will be used to help customers understand both home internet service providers (ISP’s) and mobile carriers. While not mandatory carriers are being “urged” to use the labels which will give you an idea about the following properties:

  • Price
    • This includes all those hidden fees they often hide, such as line rental or limited discounts
  • Data Caps
    • Ever felt like you may be getting a slower service? You should be able to see if you’ve hit your data usage cap, if one even exists
  • Speed
    • This will be included alongside things like latent and packet loss, giving you an idea not just how fast your service would be but also how reliable it is to

ISP’s are free to come up with their own labels, but they must be made in an “accurate, understandable and easy-to-find manner”.

Examples of the Broadband and Mobile labels can be found below.

Hoping to avoid the surprise fee’s that account for more than 2,000 complaints received by the FCC, the new labels could help people decide on the company that’s right for them, rather than the advertisement that fools the most.

No More FCC Labels on Your Devices

Today President Obama signed into US law the E-Label Act, an act introduced by two Senators earlier in 2015, ending the mandatory requirement for physical FCC labels on devices.

The law allows manufacturers to include the FCC labels in their software rather than having to etch them onto the device’s exterior. It’s said that this will save manufactures money, which can then be passed on to consumers.

This isn’t entirely new, as the FCC already loosened its rules on labelling earlier this year, but today’s ruling brings the changes into law. The labels will be included in software like as can be seen above, on an iPhone 6 Plus.

Still, a lot won’t change, most devices will still have the labels of the European Commission on them, that’s if they don’t change their status on the subject too.

Regardless, we all know who’ll be happy whatever happens, even if it is just one more tiny logo he can remove from his designs – Apple’s Jony Ive.

Source: MacRumors

YouTube Launching Streaming Music Service, Ad-free Video Subscription a Possibility

Are you ready for YouTube’s music streaming service? The cats been let out of the bag by YouTube’s CEO Susan Wojcicki during a recent interview. Wojcicki told re/code that the company had been working on the music streaming service for quite some time, but the launch of the platform won’t be ready to go by the end of the year.

A YouTube music streaming service has been a long time coming, with many rumours of the service having frequented headlines on and off for nearly two years. Originally codenamed Music Key – the project was seemingly on track, at least until public backlash was made over an internal decision at YouTube to block indie labels that didn’t wish to submit their material to the site. The outcry over the internal decision at YouTube was so immense that the then product manager at YouTube Chris LaRose stood down from his position at the company.

On top of the music streaming announcement from YouTube, Wojcicki also hinted at an ad-free video subscription service. However, the CEO kept her cards close to her chest when asked for more information regarding such a subscription model. YouTube is currently ‘thinking about how to give users options’ as to how the platform can be viewed.

For more information on YouTube’s upcoming plans – you can find the full stage interview here.

Thanks to re/code for providing us with this inforation.

Image courtesy of re/code.