Klingon is Covered by Copyright Claims Paramount

Star Trek is a series loved and followed by millions, with everyone and their parents having grown up with the adventures of the starship Enterprise. Sadly a short film made by fans to cover a gap in the universe could be stopped as it would appear that Klingon is covered by copyright.

Klingons are one of, if not the most, well-known races in the star Trek universe. Being a warrior race by nature, it was always referenced (and was a key part of James T Kirks character) that the Federation and the Klingons had gone to war. A fan film created by Alec Peters looked to explore this war but seems like it may never see the light of day due to a copyright claim made by Paramount and CBS, the holders of Star Treks intellectual property.

After being told it wasn’t detailed enough the claim has now been updated to cite several instances where the fan film presses on Star Trek’s copyright. This includes the gold command shirts and even the pointed Vulcan ears, but the claim also goes on to state that the entire Klingon language is covered under copyright.

Is it possible to copyright an entire language (fictional or real world)? Should the fan made the film, which has been funded by a Kickstarter project none the less, be stopped by the copyright claim or should they come to a deal to create the film with the full support of the company?

You can read the full document listing every single copyright infringement in the film here.

Welsh Assembly Responds to UFO Questions in Klingon

A series of questions posed by a Conservative MP regarding UFO sightings within the borders of Wales, the Welsh government responded in Klingon, the language of the infamous Star Trek antagonists. Shadow Minister for Health and Social Services and MP for Clwyd West Darren Millar asked Labour MP Edwina Hart, the Minister for Economy, Science, and Transport, three questions regarding UFOs at the Welsh Assembly.

Millar asked:

  • Will the minister make a statement on how many reports of unidentified flying objects there have been at Cardiff Airport since its acquisition by the Welsh government?
  • What discussions has the Welsh government had with the Ministry of Defence regarding sightings of unidentified flying objects in Wales in each of the past five years?
  • What consideration has the Welsh government given to the funding of research into sightings of unidentified flying objects in Wales?

To which the Welsh Assembly responded, in writing:

“jang vIDa je due luq. ‘ach ghotvam’e’ QI’yaH-devolved qaS.”

The reply in Klingon roughly translates as “The minister will reply in due course. However this is a non-devolved matter.” By “non-devolved”, it means that only the UK Parliament can respond, rather than the devolved Welsh Assembly. Since it was not in a position to offer a response, it seems that someone within the Welsh government decided to have a little fun with it.

Millar’s retort, a cheap gag, made him sound a little sore: “I’ve always suspected that Labour ministers came from another planet. This response confirms it.” A Conservative Party spokesperson claims that Millar relayed the questions on behalf of a handful of North Walians, saying, “Darren tabled these questions after being contacted by constituents.”

An official response – relaying the same response, only in English and Welsh this time – from Edwina Hart is due on 15th July.

Thank you Ars Technica for providing us with this information.

You Can Now Learn Klingon Online

Have you ever been asked “Dargh DaneH’a’?” and not known how to respond? Well, help is here, as free language-learning resource Duolingo is now offering online courses teaching Klingon.

For those who thought that Star Trek’s warrior race only expelled guttural disemboguements, Klingon is a genuine language, developed by linguist Marc Okrand during the making of 1984’s Star Trek III: The Search for Spock.

Duolingo is offering courses in the language as part of its crowdsourced Language Incubator program, rather than its core Duolingo framework, and is available on all platforms, from online to apps on iOS, Android, and Windows Phone. The Language Incubator invites the community to teach and learn languages, so if you jIyaj, Duolingo could use your help.

By the way, is someone asks you “Dargh DaneH’a’?”, my answer is always “yes, please!”

Source: Engadget