Microsoft Supports Apple in FBI Encryption Case

Speaking at a hearing today, Microsoft president and chief legal officer, Brad Smith announced that the company ‘wholeheartedly’ support one of their competitors, Apple in the long-running case between Apple and the FBI.

In case you’ve not heard about the ongoing battle, the FBI have ordered Apple to remove the security blocks that the tech giant has put into place on their devices in order for the FBI to be able to access it.

This has all been sparked by the incident where Farook Malik and his wife, Tashfeen killed 14 people in an attack last year. The FBI want access to the encrypted iPhone as it may have evidence to support the investigation.

Apple spoke at today’s hearing The Verge told us, Smith used an adding machine made in 1912 when the law was passed.

“We do not believe that courts should seek to resolve issues of 21st century technology with a law that was written in the era of the adding machine,”

Apple’s CEO, Tim Cook spoke out too, he said that the decision to refuse the FBI was hard, but he feels that it was the correct thing to do.

The FBI has argued that Apple is overstating the security risk to its devices. FBI Director James Comey said Apple had the technical know-how to break into Farook’s device only in a way that did not create a so-called “backdoor” into every Apple device.

The law that has been used in this case is the All Writs act of 1789, of which the Department of Justice has used twice against Apple to open a smartphone. Both cases are still open. The law itself is very brief and broad.

“The Supreme Court and all courts established by Act of Congress may issue all writs necessary or appropriate in aid of their respective jurisdictions and agreeable to the usages and principles of law.”

The act is one of last resort. All other avenues have to be exhausted before the All Writs Act can be invoked.

More People Died from Selfies than Sharks This Year

It’s a sad state of affairs when people have been going out into the wild to slaughter sharks in areas that a human was attacked by one. Here’s a hint for people, sharks live in the sea, we do not, if you get bitten by one, it’s because you generally don’t belong there. Yet I find it infinitely more sad that we’re doing an even better job at killing ourselves taking selfies.

Just this year alone there have been eight shark-related deaths, which is a sad thing for sure as no one wants to lose a loved one. However, there have been twelve deaths due to people taking selfies in dangerous situations, something that only a Darwin Award can help justify. A 66-year-old Japanese tourist died recently after he and his companion fell down the stairs of the Taj Mahal while taking a selfie. In fact, four of the deaths so far were due to falling, only proving that you should literally look where you are going, not at your phone screen.

Falling killed the most, but a close second were people being hit or injured by trains. We’ve heard of people trying to take photos with wild bears, at bull runs and all kinds of stupid things.

There’s nothing wrong with taking a selfie, but there’s no sense in putting yourself in danger. Check your surroundings, if you’re standing in the way of a moving vehicle, selfie or on the edge of a cliff… move before picking your favorite Instagram filter.

Microsoft HoloLens Project Designer Killed in Drunk Driving Hit-and-Run

Microsoft’s HoloLens project has a lot of people excited, including the entire staff here at eTeknix. The project has however suffered one of the saddest setbacks it could as one of its project designers was involved in a fatal hit-and-run accident last weekend.

Mike Ey was just 30-years old and described as a caring and reliable person by those who knew him. According to news reports, Mike was hit from behind on State Route 520 in Redmond, WA by a drunk driver. After barely missing another driver with speeds in excess of 100mph the drunk driver rear ended Mike Ey, who died from the injuries. The driver was seen fleeing the scene and arrested by Police shortly after. He is now facing vehicular homicide and felony hit and run charges.

“He was the most reliable person ever. You could ask him anything and he would make sure it got done, whether he knew how to do it or not,” said Kelley Piering, Mike’s girlfriend.

May he rest in peace.

Thank you CanadianOnlineGamer for providing us with this information.

Far Cry 4 Copies Bought from Third Party Sellers Killed

Buying cheap game keys from third-party resellers might seem like a tempting opportunity, but one that doesn’t necessarily end the way one would have hoped.

Reports are starting to surface that Ubisoft is killing Far Cry 4 copies bought through third-party resellers, namely G2Play and G2A. Both are popular digital retailers based in Hong Kong that scan and/or photograph the keys from retail boxes. The games are a lot cheaper there and the internet allows them to sell those keys digitally worldwide where the games cost more.

“This is an outrageous and ridiculous way of doing business. And don’t you think as I do, that maybe those people who actually PAY for the game (even though Ubisoft will make a few bucks less in Poland because I bought the game from…I don’t know, a…hungarian original retailer), will, in time, in frustration, after that sort of strategy and behaviour, after the way you made people buy not-finished games, will stop buying them at all or keep using less scrupulous retailers to get what they want? And nobody wants that.”Voiced a user on the Ubisoft support forums

The above statement doesn’t stand on its own, as the forum thread has 19 pages with over 180 posts at the time of writing, mostly with support for the OP.

This isn’t the first-time publishers have cancelled third-party keys. Devolver Digital also cancelled any keys obtained through the G2Play website.

Ubisoft has reportedly been advising customers to contact the seller and claim that the license removal is not their fault, yet no official word has been given just yet. There are also rumours going around that the keys were stolen and that’s why they’re being blocked – a normal procedure when shipments of keys/games get highjacked.

What do you think about this latest Ubisoft incident? Stolen keys or just another case of publishers that see a potential smaller profit?

Thanks to GameZone for providing us with this information