Segway Patent Looks To Ban Hoverboards

Segways are the next best thing when it comes to showing off your technology in public. The end result though was the creation of “hoverboards” or swagboards as some call them. A device that operates in a similar fashion just without the handlebars that you find in Segways. A Segway patent could see away with the competition though as it looks to ban Hoverboards and other such devices.

The US International Trade Commission (ITC) has accepted a patent complaint that Segway filed in 2014 that is now going to be enforced by a general exclusion order. A general exclusion order is considered the most powerful remedy the ITC can issue, even involving people not directly involved in the complaint.

US Patent No 8,830,048 describes a device with wheels, a drive, and sensors to detect the pitch of the user support among other things. The second claim then carries this on by mentioning the use of a handlebar extending the features previously mentioned.

While the second claim covers the segway, the first claim would effectively cover devices such as the hoverboard which have been received and purchased by the public in far greater quantities than the original Segway.

President Obama has 60 days to accept the exclusion (something that is rarely blocked) and if it is accepted the exclusion order will then need enforcing, blocking imports and sales of anything that would infringe on Segway’s patent.

Judge Rules NVIDIA Violated Three Samsung Patents – Sales Ban Threatened

NVIDIA must be regretting filing the lawsuit accusing of Samsung of building GPUs without permission – surreptitiously claiming that NVIDIA invented the GPU – that it subsequently lost back in October. Samsung filed a countersuit against NVIDIA, alleging that the latter was infringing on a number of its patents. Judge David Shaw of the United States International Trade Commission (ITC) has now ruled that NVIDIA is indeed in violation of three of Samsung’s patents.

While the decision is not yet final, the judge considers NVIDIA to be in violation of Samsung’s US6147385US6173349, and US7804734 patents, for an SRAM module, a shared strobe buffer, and data strobe buffer, respectively.

Samsung argued during the case that its patents allowed chip manufacturers to put “what used to fill an entire circuit board with dozens of discrete components all onto a single chip the size of your thumbnail.”

If the ruling enforced, it could result in a sales ban of any infringing  NVIDIA chip. However, patent US6173349 expires during 2016, so any ban against technology that violates that patent would only be in effect for a matter of months.

Following the decision, NVIDIA’s stock dropped by 27 cents to $32.66 during after-hours trading.

“We are disappointed,” said  NVIDIA spokesperson Hector Marinez, in a statement to Bloomberg. “We look forward to seeking review by the full ITC which will decide this case several months from now.”

Samsung has yet to comment on the matter.

Image courtesy of Wikimedia.

ITC Court Rules in Favour of Samsung in Nvidia Patent Dispute

Nvidia and Samsung have been locked in a bit of a patent war for a while now, with Nvidia filing a class action lawsuit claiming that they effectively invented the modern 3D GPU and that Samsung is using it without their permission. Of course, Samsung wasn’t going to back down from such a fight, as they’ve got a huge business of their own to protect and they filed a counter suit against Nvidia.

Recent developments are certainly looking good for Samsung, as the ITC has declared that Samsung has no infringed upon the Nvidia patents for modern GPUs. Nvidia lost 2 out of 3 patent infringement claims, but to rub salt into the wound, the third claim was thrown out on ground of invalidity, giving Samsung a clean win.

Of course, the battle is far from over and Nvidia won’t be packing up their bags and going home just yet. The case is still under review by the full commission and is subject to revision. The final decision will not arrive until February and an Nvidia spokesperson says that they’re still confident in their case against Samsung.

This is patent trolling on the highest level, and if Nvidia did prove to have created the first modern graphics card, the GeForce 256 (see above) and subsequently hold the patents to them thereafter, it could have huge repercussions on Samsung and also Qualcomm, but again, that remains to be seen.

Thank you WCCF for providing us with this information.

Apple Patent Wars Continue Preventing Sales In United States

The United States International Trade Commission, “…which serves the public by implementing U.S. law and contributing to the development and sound and informed U.S. trade policy.” as stated in their mission statement.

In upholding their policies the U.S. ITC has issued a limited exclusion order, cease & desist order for Apple iPhone 4 and 3GS, iPad 3G , and iPad 2 3G all of which are AT&T models. Apple violated a Samsung patent covering technology used in sending information over wireless networks. though President Barack Obama can veto this decision, or it can be blocked by an appeals court, if the ruling stands it will restrict the importation of the listed iPhones and iPads designed to work on the AT&T network.

The patent will not affect the newer Apple products including the iPhone 5 and the 4th Gen iPad.

Apple and Samsung seem to have been duking it out for quite some time now, it seems that every couple of weeks there is a new story about Samsung and Apple fighting about something. Patents are important for companies, at the same time, there are a lot of patents that have gone unused, that could be very useful to some people. Patents protect companies who spend thousands, hundreds of thousands if not millions of dollars in developing a technology, a patent protects a company who invents in the technology to produce a product without interference from other companies that might have stolen the tech.

There is quite a bit of information on this patent and the issues brought forth above, if you’re interested in doing more research on this topic here are a few useful links.

Google has a copy of the patent available on their system, HERE. Which explains it as “Apparatus and method for encoding/decoding transport format combination indicator in CDMA mobile communication system”

U.S. ITC has published their investigative history HERE. And their ruling can be found HERE.

Original image courtesy of Apple.com