Samsung Hosting a Meeting to Standardize 5G Standards

We’ve all heard about 3G and 4G, the standards that define the technology that has helped shape mobile communications and mobile phones for the last generation. Samsung looks to get ahead with the next generation by hosting a meeting in hopes of standardizing standards for the next generation, 5G.

Hosting the 3GPP RAN (3rd Generation Partnership Project – Radio Access Network) group, Samsung Electronics hopes that the meeting taking place in Busan, Korea, will help encourage companies to “discuss ways to support the effective integration of new services such as IoT (Internet of Things) into 5G, and measures to ensure the compatibility of 5G technologies”.

5G is not a new technology, having been in development by Samsung since 2011, but with more and more companies looking to have the first standards ready for June 2018, we could soon see a network that could see speeds of 1.2 Gbps for moving vehicles and 7.5 gigabytes for anyone who stands still for a minute.

With companies looking at rolling out the technology for 2020, the meeting hopes to cover everything from energy and cost efficiency to security and availability, all key factors in releasing a successful piece of technology that people not only accept and pick up but support years down the road.

Tenda Releases F3 Router Perfect for Large IoT Homes

Tenda just announced the availability on their newest router called the F3 and while it might look a little weird to begin with, it certainly does have its benefits. The Tenda F3 is a slim and low-profile 2.4GHz 300Mbps router which might not sound like much when compared to flagship routers that come with all the bells and whistles attached, but it does have its benefits.

The 2.4 GHz band might not sport the high gigabit speeds you can get off  the 5 GHz band, but it does have a much better coverage and allows you to reach the furthest corners of your home without dead zones. Tenda amplified this feature by equipping the router with three external 5dBi antennas that can achieve a full coverage of a 200 square meter home.

The router is advertised as a mainstream router thanks its basic wireless features and low price of just $24.99 USD, but I see it more as the perfect router for the home of tomorrow and powered with all sorts of IoT (Internet of Things) devices. Networking your home appliances and connecting them requires a great connectivity that is both just stable and also covers each and every corner of your home. You need to be able to prioritize traffic and assign bandwidth limitations to make sure your vital IoT devices have uninterrupted and lag-free connections, and Tenda’s router OS has all the features for this built right into the easy-to-use interface.

Naturally, the router will be just as great for sharing your internet connection among all your PCs, smartphones, TVs, and what other devices you might have. The only downside is really the 100 Mbps LAN and WAN ports, but that can easily be rectified by adding a simple Gbps switch between your systems and the router.

Specifications

  • Dimension: 127.4mm*90.5mm*26mm
  • Antenna: 3x5dBi external undetachable antennas
  • Power Consumption: 1.9W(no load)~3.3W(full-load)
  • Power Supply: DC 9V 600mA
  • Button: WPS/RESET
  • LED: SYS, WiFi, LAN(1-3), WAN, T, WPS
  • Frequency: 2.4GHz
  • Interface: 10/100M auto-negotiation WAN port ; 3*10/100M auto-negotiation LAN ports
  • Standard: IEEE 802.11 b/g/n

Gigabyte Unveils EL-20-3700-32GB IoT Gateway Solution

Internet of Things, or IoT for short, is the next big thing in the digital revolution. To say it as simple as possible, IoT basically connects devices with each other and the internet in order to provide the data where it’s needed. We see a lot of new hardware being released in this sector and while some are completely new and independent, others bridge the gap between old-school legacy devices and the new IoT devices.

Gigabyte’s new EL-20-3700-32GB Intel Bear Ridge IoT Gateway Solution is just such a device as it will allow companies to connect sense, filters, process, analyzing and actuation while securing and managing machines and data. It supports onboarding, monitoring, diagnostics, and remote control of devices that otherwise would be unconnected.

It is built with an Intel Pentium N3700 Processor that is based on the Airmont microarchitecture and it’s Intel’s leading tri-gate 14nm process. The System on a Chip quad-core processor is designed to be very power effective and can drive both computing and graphics performance with a maximum power envelope of just 6W.

Besides the N3700 CPU, the EL-20-3700-32GB offers 32GB eMMC flash memory and two SO-DIMM DDR3 slots for up to 8GB 1600MHz memory. It sports two Gigabit Ethernet RJ45 ports powered by a Realtek RTL8111HS controller and four USB 3.0 ports. The two HDMI ports can handle resolutions up to 4K and the unit also features surround sound via a Realtek ALC255 controller.

Other options include one Full-size Mini-PCIe slot for 3G module or mSATA storage and one Half-size Mini-PCIe slot for the pre-installed WiFi+BT module. Speaking of which, the module is an Intel Dual-Band Wireless-AC 3160 which supports IEEE 802.11b/g/n/ac and Bluetooth 4.0.

Further, you’ll find an SDXC card slot and three user-configurable LEDs, and a micro-USB connector with OTG support. The full unit will be unveiled and presented at the Embedded World in Nuremberg in a couple of weeks.

Feature Highlights

  • Intel Pentium processor N3700
  • 2 x SO-DIMM DDR3L slots
  • 2 x GbE LAN ports (Realtek RTL8111HS)
  • 32GB onboard eMMC memory
  • 1 x mSATA slot
  • 1 x SDCX card slot
  • 1 x SIM card slot

Should you want to build the unit into a more enclosed space and not have it as a standalone unit, then Gigabyte also offers the motherboard on its own and the IoT board can be found under the product name MZBSWFP.

The Gigabyte EL-20-3700-32GB will be available at AVnet after it has been officially launched at Embedded World.

US Select Committee Calls Internet of Things a “Threat” to National Security

Smart devices and the Internet of Things (IoT) potentially poses an imminent security threat to the United States this year, according to a Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. James R. Clapper, Director of National Intelligence, presented the Worldwide Threat Assessment of the US Intelligence Community report [PDF] to the Senate on Tuesday (9th February).

In his annual security assessment, Clapper warned that IoT devices possess insecurities that can be exploited, or used as backdoors into larger systems, by hackers.

“The consequences of innovation and increased reliance on information technology in the next few years on both our society’s way of life in general and how we in the intelligence community specifically perform our mission will probably be far greater in scope and impact than ever,” James R. Clapper, Director of National Intelligence, writes in his report. “Devices, designed and fielded with minimal security requirements and testing, and an ever-increasing complexity of networks could lead to widespread vulnerabilities in civilian infrastructures and US government systems.”

Clapper is also of the opinion that smart devices could be used as a means of surveillance, writing, “In the future, intelligence services might use the loT for identification, surveillance, monitoring, location tracking, and targeting for recruitment, or to gain access to networks or user credentials.”

WiFithing Makes the Internet of Things Open to Everyone

Usually, Internet of Things (IoT) platforms are designed to function only with other products by the same manufacturer, and those who need a universal system have to build it themselves, which requires both hardware and coding knowhow. WiFithing, however, is an IoT hub designed to be used by anyone out of the box, with no coding required, and across a wide range of internet-connected products.

WiFithing was originally designed as a hub to zone-control home heating systems back in 2013, but has since evolved into a multi-function IoT platform that can also control and schedule lighting, smart sockets, air conditioning, or any WiFi mains device. In addition, if you do possess the technical knowledge, you can modify WiFithing’s open source software to monitor electricity and gas usage, or control home security systems, such as automated gates, motion sensors, and cameras.

The platform and its slave devices can be controlled via either its own smartphone app or PC interface, using SSL encryption, and can be controlled locally even if you lose internet connection. WifFithing and its slaves are low power, so can even be powered by batteries, allowing access to inconvenient areas.

WiFithing, an impressive platform that can bring the Internet of Things to the homes of noobs and pros alike, is close to hitting its Kickstarter goal; the device has seven days to go with £3,405 to left to raise.

Shodan Makes Snooping on Vulnerable Webcams Easy

Shodan is a search engine designed to allow users to search through information on devices that are connected to the internet. The site, named after the AI from the System Shock series of games has been around since 2009, making news ever since as it has allowed access to potentially unsafe systems that have been exposed to the public internet, such as power stations and oddities including gym equipment. The newest feature to be added to Shodan has now put it back under the spotlight with a newly added section of the site allowing users to browse and view vulnerable webcams.

These feeds capture all manner of activities, from people’s offices and kitchens to far more worrying things including banks, schools, laboratories, drug plantations and even sleeping babies. Security researcher Dan Tentler told Ars Technica “It’s all over the place, practically everything you can think of.” He went on to explain that the prevalence of vulnerable Internet of Things (IoT) devices is the result of a race to the bottom by webcam manufacturers. Typical users tend not to value security and privacy to the point that they’d pay more for a product, allowing manufacturers to slash the costs of their devices to maximize profit. The end result of this race is a slew of cheap insecure devices being on the market and filling more and more homes as times go by.

The vulnerability of the devices is rooted in their use of the Real Time Streaming Protocol (RTSP) on port 554 to share their video, but often have no authentication systems in place to protect it from access. Many of the devices have surfaced on Shodan as the site crawls the internet searching for IP address with ports open to connections. If the port provides a video feed and lacks any authentication, it captures an image from the feed, records the IP address and port and moves on. While Shodan may take flak for publicly exposing so much private footage, it is hardly the one to blame and, in fact, sheds light on the poor state of security often applied to consumer IoT products. Tentler estimates that millions of insecure webcams are connected and easily discoverable through Shodan.

Shodan’s image is available to its paid users at images.shodan.io while those users with free accounts can find an array of video devices by using the search filter “port:554 has_screenshot:true“. It is truly frightening how much is haplessly made available to anyone online, with users expecting manufacturers to handle the security for them, but the manufacturers being unwilling to raise the cost for the sake of security. Hopefully, the images made public by this new feature of Shodan will convince both users and manufacturers to value cybersecurity more in this increasingly connected world.

Control Your IoT Devices with WiFithing

A new open source Wi-Fi and ISM device from a UK startup hopes to centralise all your home IoT requirements in one simple hub. WiFithing is a simple smart device controller designed for entry-level users, meaning that no extra coding is required. Out of the box, it can control smart sockets, lighting, and heating, all via a PC interface or smartphone app.

WiFithing, which uses SSL encryption, can help you schedule when heating, lighting, and power sockets are activated – for both convenience and security – and for how long, while more advanced users can rig one of WiFithing’s slave devices up to motion sensors, gate openers, and gas and electricity meters.

The WiFithing master and slave boxes are low-power, meaning that users will not see their electricity bills increase for the privilege, and the devices can even run on battery power for added convenience.

Since WiFithing use open source software, its creators hope that industrious coders will help expand the range of IoT ecosystems the device can exploit. The software already supports the Orvibo ecosystem, and is looking into LightwaveRF and 433MHz support.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/180874809/wifithing

WiFithing is in the midst of its Kickstarter campaign, raising £11,519 in pledges of its £15,000 target, with 11 days remaining.

Wi-Fi Alliance Approves New 802.11ah Standard

The Wi-Fi Alliance has announced a new Wi-Fi solution that offers a greater range while using less power. The new 802.11ah standard, dubbed HaLow, operates on the unlicensed 900MHz band, boasting twice the range of the 2.4GHz standard, and offers greater wall penetration. It is hoped that HaLow will power the next generation of IoT (internet of things) devices, since it will require less power of its devices, while able to transmit across larger distances.

“Wi-Fi HaLow extends Wi-Fi into the 900MHz band, enabling the low power connectivity necessary for applications including sensor and wearables,” the announcement on the Wi-Fi Alliance website reads. “Wi-Fi HaLow’s range is nearly twice that of today’s Wi-Fi, and will not only be capable of transmitting signals further, but also providing a more robust connection in challenging environments where the ability to more easily penetrate walls or other barriers is an important consideration.”

“Wi-Fi HaLow will broadly adopt Wi-Fi protocols and deliver many of the benefits that consumers have come to expect from Wi-Fi today, including multi-vendor interoperability, strong government-grade security, and easy setup,” the statement adds.

“Wi-Fi HaLow is well suited to meet the unique needs of the Smart Home, Smart City, and industrial markets because of its ability to operate using very low power, penetrate through walls, and operate at significantly longer ranges than Wi-Fi today,” Edgar Figueroa, President and CEO of Wi-Fi Alliance, said at CES 2016 during the reveal of HaLow. “Wi-Fi HaLow expands the unmatched versatility of Wi-Fi to enable applications from small, battery-operated wearable devices to large-scale industrial facility deployments – and everything in between.”

Imagination Launches ‘IoT In A Box’ Kickstarter

UK-based Imagination Technologies has launched a Kickstarter for the Creator Ci40, described as “the ultimate IoT-in-a-box dev kit”.

The kit includes:

  • A powerful IoT hub, the Creator Ci40 development boardintegrates a 550 MHz dual-core, dual-threaded MIPS CPU running OpenWrt and a multi-standard connectivity package (802.11ac 2×2, Bluetooth 4.1, 802.15.4, fast Ethernet), with room for further expansion
  • Two battery-powered MikroElektronika Clicker boardsfeaturing a dedicated 6LoWPAN chip and the mikroBUS socket for adding sensors
  • Three MikroElektronika Click boardsfor measuring temperature, detecting motion, and controlling a relay (hundreds of other Click boards are available from MikroElektronika)

The Creator Ci40 development board acts as the central hub, connecting all other IoT add-ons with its dual-core and dual-threaded 550MHz MIPS InterAptiv CPU. The board’s Ensigma connectivity engine supports 802.11ac 2×2 MIMO WiFi and Bluetooth 4.1.

The additional boards include two MikroElektronika Clickers, each with a 32-bit Microchip controller, mikroProg connector, USB connector, LEDs, push and reset buttons, and external electronics interfacing headers. The boards can standalone, powered by two AAA batteries.

The development supports three open source operating systems – OpenWRT router OS, Google’s Brillo, and a Debian Linux distro – plus Buildroot, which can compile embedded Linux systems, while the expansion boards run the Contiki real-time OS.

The Creator Ci40 is already over one-quarter the way to its £20,000 goal, having raised £5,617 at time of writing. The development board is available for those that pledge £35 (plus £5 shipping), while the full kit, including expansion boards, can be purchased for a pledge of £80 (plus £12 shipping).

ASRock’s New G10 Gaming Router Is Now Available

ASRock showcased their G10 gaming router back at Computex and we have been wondering since then when it finally would become available. That time has arrived now as ASRock announced the availability of this impressive and strong-looking router.

ASRock’s G10 gaming router takes your wireless signal as well as feature list to a whole new level for routers. Starting with the 4T4R 802.11a/b/g/n/ac wireless connection that is the fastest ac with up to 1733Mbps on the 5GHz band and 800Mbps on the 2.4GHz band thanks to the 8 dipole high power antennas hidden inside this unit. Whether the fact that the antennas are internal will affect the range is something to be seen in reviews and actual testing.

The ASRock G10 comes with one WAN and four LAN ports for wired connectivity as well as two USB 3.0 ports for direct storage and printer attachment. The router will be available in several models where some of them come with a detachable 2-in-1 dongle called H2R that may serve as an independent travel access point (AP) and an HDMI dongle for projecting your handheld device’s screen onto an HDMI compliant monitor, otherwise known as Miracasting. It is compatible with both Apple, Android, and Windows and it will also be sold separately for those who don’t want to settle for Chromecast.

Another really cool feature in the G10 gaming router is its IR capabilities. It can learn any infrared signal from your current remotes and then send them out on command. That allows you to control any IR device within range of the router through an easy to use smart-app on your mobile phone or tablet.

D-Link DCS-935L mydlink Home Monitor HD Wi-Fi Camera Review

Introduction


Today I’m taking a look at a somewhat different product than I am used to and that is a wireless home security camera. Security becomes a bigger and bigger issue for a lot of people and many would like to keep an extra eye on the home while they are away. The D-Link DCS-935L Home Monitor HD allows you to do just that and I’ll be taking a closer look at the hardware and software that comes along.

The mydlink Home Monitor HD, as it is known by as full name, allows you to monitor your home from where ever you are and see everything in full-colour high-definition 720p with sound, may it be from a computer, tablet, or a smartphone. The WiFi camera also comes with built-in night vision that allows you to see up to 5 meters in complete darkness.

One of the places that held many people back in the past and stopped them up from entering the world of do-it-yourself home security was the setup. It could be very complicated and require a lot of running of wires at the same time. That made people hesitate and they rather invested in a commercial and subscription-based security plan. Granted, a camera like this cannot do the same, but in return it can be set up by anyone and it only requires the initial purchase.

The DCS-935L WiFi camera is as easy to set up and connects to your Wi-Fi network, all it takes is the press of a button. Simply press the WPS button and you are securely connected to your wireless network at home. There is no need for extra and additional control hubs or other hard to configure interfaces and router settings.

The DCS-935L WiFi camera is part of the mydlink structure of smart home devices, allowing you to create your own smart home, all without a complicated setup. Those devices include music streamers, Wi-Fi motion sensors, Smart Plugs, and also the Home Monitor cameras as the DCS-935L.

Everything is connected through the mydlink Home app that is compatible with both Android and iOS-based smartphones and tablets. You can view the stream from anywhere you are connected to an internet connection, allowing you to always know what is going on in your home. You can also set the camera to alarm you when sound or motion is detected. Again, everything without complicated setup, installation cost, or monthly subscription charges.

The camera stand on the DCS-935L Wireless camera can be used universally in may ways, allowing you to place the camera in a convenient place and at the same time having it pointed where you want it to. You can turn and tip the camera and also hang it on a wall or ceiling that way. The rear of the stand features a cut-out to route the power cable through and still have it mounted properly.

Whether you want the camera to keep an eye on your kids or pets while you’re away, monitor for possible intruders, or something completely different, the D-Link DCS-935L could be a perfect choice. The smart hardware combined with the smart apps allow you to set up a smart home as easy as it rarely, if ever, has been seen before.

Specifications

The specifications are taken directly from the manufacturers specification page and can as such be subject to change in possible future revisions of the product.

Key Features

  • WiFi with easy WPS setup
  • 720p HD resolution
  • Microphone for sound recording
  • Nightvision for up to 5 meters in full darkness
  • Motion and Sound detection
  • No charges, fees, or complicated setups
  • Monitoring from Smartphones and Tablets

Packaging and Content

The DCS-935L WiFi camera comes in a little box that displays all the relevant information about the product easy to read. Inside you’ll find a power adapter, the camera in itself, and manuals and guides that allow you to get started quick and easy.

The included power adapter uses a universal plug switch as seen below. Even if you bought it in a foreign market or traveling with it, all that’s required is a new plug part. Flip the old out, put a new in, and you’re done. These plugs are used on many power supply units and there is a good chance that you already have one or multiple of the same principle.

You Can Install Windows 10 to a Raspberry Pi

Microsoft has launched Windows 10 now and everyone is talking about it. A lot of people have already upgraded while just as many wait for their downloads to finish. There are of course also those who don’t want to upgrade or aren’t eligible for the free upgrade and then there is them that own a Raspberry Pi.

Yes, you read that right, you can also get Windows 10 for that tiny $35 pocket PC as well as other mini-systems such as the MinnowBoard Max and Intel Galileo. Okay granted, this isn’t the full desktop version, but rather the IoT (Internet of Things) version and you’ll need an already upgraded PC with the normal Windows 10 to get started. But from there on it is an easy task.

The Windows 10 IoT Core tools are available to download directly from Microsoft. Flash it onto an SD card and boot up your Raspberry Pi and get coding and controlling. Windows 10 IoT Core will boot automatically after connecting the power supply. This will take a few minutes. Once the device has booted, the DefaultApp will launch and display the IP address of RPi2. You can now connect through PowerShell or SSH to your freshly installed Windows 10 Pi.

Files and guides can all be found on Microsofts site and it is truly as easy as following a checklist.

What Comes in the Project Fi Welcome Box

Google has done some neat packaging over time for their gadgets and accessories, not cutting back on the presentation. Project Fi is no different and Google sends out a very large box when you sign up for the new carrier to help make sure you have a good first experience with the invite-only service.

Android Central managed to get their hands on the new kit and posted the below:

The welcome box, which is about the size of a Nexus 9, matches the look of Nexus device boxes with white cardboard and bright primary colors inside. And when you open it up, you’re greeted with a great stash of accessories for you Nexus 6. Check ’em out.

The box is divided into three sections with plastic containers holding a set of headphones, a mobile battery pack and a white case for your Nexus 6. Each one is neatly wrapped in plastic with a cheeky saying on the front, and will definitely have you feeling giddy if you’re a Google fan.

The headphones are white with blue ear tips (there are three pairs) and a green/white/blue volume rocker along the right wire with a nice “Fi” logo on it. The headphones end with a gigantic 3.5mm headphone jack that has a splitter coming off of it so you can plug in a second set of headphones “fora friend” … I don’t really need to share my music all that often, and with how big the headphone jack is I can guarantee I won’t be using the headphones at all. Shame, they’re actually quite cool other than that.

The battery pack carries the Google colors and a Project Fi logo on the front, and has a 6000 mAh capacity. It has dual USB outputs — one at 2.1A and another at 1A. The design of the battery is decidedly more practical than the headphones.

The case is a very standard white Case Mate model that’s a hard shell with a small rubber bumper that goes on it to give it more grip around the phone. Another “Fi” logo adorns the bottom-left corner of the back, and the button covers on the side are fun blue and green colors.

The new service was announced last month to American users and google are now sending out invites to their project. If you want to get involved then you should request an invite here.

Thank you to Android Central for providing us with this information

Images courtesy of Google

 

CRYORIG Presented IoT Enabled PSU

Let’s face it, most new PC hardware is just old shoes in new boxes, with improvements but still basically the same. But once in a while a new product comes along that has a nice twist and in this case it is a power supply.

CRYORIG displayed their newest idea at Computex, an Internet of Things (IoT) enabled power supply. The CRYORIG Pi is only a proof of concept so far and it is working and being demonstrated. The actual line of products is targeted for a release in 2016 with wattage ranging from 600 to +1000 Watts and 80 Plus Gold to Platinum certifications.

Internet of Things is gaining a lot of momentum at the moment and in short, these are smart devices that lets you control their actions from anywhere through remote connections. This is also the case for CRYORIGS new Pi power supply that will allow you to wake or shut your system down remotely thanks to the patent pending Zero Hassle Hardware Wake (ZHH Wake) technology that directly controls your motherboard.

Forgot to shut down your system before you left home, do it from anywhere. Need to boot up your extra file server and access some data from a remote location, no problem. Read in the news that a thunderstorm is closing on your home, shut down the system until it has passed. There are a lot of possibilities with this technology.

From this base CRYORIG’s Pi line can extend further capabilities such as fan speed control, energy usage recording and management, electric bill estimations as well as PSU health and deterioration reporting all directly to a mobile phone app.

This is a pretty cool and innovative idea, let us just hope that it will actually result in a final product and not end up never being released such as Captherms Multiphase cooler we saw at CES two years in a row – but never any actual product.

Google Developing New Internet of Things OS

Many everyday objects are now ‘smart’ and connected to the internet. If you feel the need to have everything automated or you want to check your email using a toaster, then you might be in luck. Google are working on a new operating system, ‘Brillo’, for low powered devices that could run on as little as 32 megabytes of RAM.

To bolster Google’s attempt to have a finger in every pie, the global giant are looking to make a new OS that would run on low amounts of RAM and power. Their aim is to develop software that can power any electronic device that can connect to the internet, even if it doesn’t have a digital screen. To put things in perspective, the aim is to have the software run on 32 megabytes of random-access memory, but at the moment its fully fledged older brother, Lollipop, is aiming at phones with a minimum of 512MB RAM. So there is quite a step down from its sibling, but this could be good news for embedded devices like the Arduino and other embedded tech.

The team developing the OS are linked to the company’s Android unit, so it isn’t a giant leap to think that it will be released with the Android brand. However, for now they are calling the software ‘Brillo’.

Google aren’t the first to get into the Internet of things market, Microsoft is releasing Windows 10 IoT core, Huawei announced recently an OS for IoT gadgets that is only 10kb in size and Samsung have announced a series of chips designed for IoT devices. So with all these large companies jumping on the bandwagon, it’s safe to assume that the Internet of Things is just around the corner and our truly connected lives are about to begin.

Thank you theinformation for providing us with this information.

New Lightbulbs Feature WiFi Boosters, Speakers and Cameras

The Internet-of-Things (IoT) aims to connect pretty much every aspect and gadget around us to the internet with smart features and functions, and such a simple thing as our light bulbs is part of this too. There are several companies out there creating smart light bulbs with additional features, which in itself is a great idea. Light bulbs are used in all our homes, everywhere and in sockets and plugs that in themselves have a direct power connection. What would be more obvious than to add extra features to these bulbs.

The Shanghai-base company Sengled unveiled a line of app-controlled LED bulbs at CES that can be set to turn on your music, boost your Wi-Fi signal and recognize your faces. The newest bulb in their lineup is the Snap and it features both a built-in security camera, microphone, and speakers as well as support for motion detection and video recording. However, it will not come cheap with a price tag of $199.99 per bulb that will have to be completely replaced once burned out.

Sengled has three other models where the Boost features a built-in Wi-Fi repeater while the Pulse and Solo bulbs come with Bluetooth speaker. The $59.99 Solo has dual 3-watt speakers and the Pulse will set you back $169.99 but will in return bring a JBL multi-channel stereo wireless speaker.

All of the bulbs use default light sockets and can be controlled with the accompanying Android and iOS apps. The bulbs are rated for 25,000 hours of use according to the company.

Thanks to Mashable for providing us with this information

Images courtesy of Mashable and Sengled

LG G Watch R Images and Specifications Leaked Ahead of Launch

LG is planning to unveil their new smart watch during next week’s IFA 2014 in Berlin, but the specifications and product images have already leaked onto the web. This isn’t the first smart watch on the market, but it is one of the few that actually look like a watch and not some square contraption mounted to your arm.

With the circular design, the button on the side and overall looks of an ordinary watch, this new G Watch R could appeal to many more then the ones from rival Apple or Samsung.

The watch is powered by a 1.2GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon Processor and has 512MB RAM. It has an internal storage of 4GB and should be running Android Wear as operating system. The screen is about 1.3 inch wide and made of an OLED panel that takes up 100 percent of the watch’s round face. It should be easy viewable in sunlight

The watch also has a heart rate monitor build in that could enrich its capabilities in personal health and exercise monitoring with companion apps. Availability is set to the fourth quarter of 2014, but no word on the price yet.

[youtube width=”800″ height=”600″]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1STW7LQXONo[/youtube]

Thank you expreview for supplying us with this information.

Images courtesy of expreview.

Worlds Smallest GPU Launched

Japanese Digital Media Professionals Inc (DMP) has launched what they call the “world’s smallest GPU IP core”. It is called the ultra-small GPU IP core, or ‘ant’ for short. With a surface area of only 0.5 mm², wearables and Internet of Things devices (IoT) are just the right product groups to target.

DMP is a company unknown to most, but many will undoubtedly have used a product or two with their chips inside. They have a long established track record in 2D and 3D visuals, specialising in the embedded and automotive markets. But it has also made GPUs for consumer products, like the popular Nintendo 3DS handheld console. The 3DS is powered by a DMP PICA200 GPU and so are several digital cameras.

The new ant chip is however intended for even smaller devices then handheld consoles or cameras. It’s believed to become a key component in the wearables and IoT markets that everyone expects to be huge in the near future. The size is perfect to supply the graphic power for small displays such as those build into smart glasses, smart watched and other small body-devices. The GPU is optimised for rendering of characters, numerals, figures and forms used in overlay-graphic-information systems.

“Size and power are the most important factors in incorporating a GPU into the small display with touch panel. The ‘ant’ is capable of achieving the lowest power consumption yet providing a rich UI experience.” said Tatsuo Yamamoto, President and CEO at DMP, “We see the miniaturization of GPUs as a key driver of the small display with rich user interface such as wearables and IoT devices.”

We should hear more about the specifications of the ultra-small GPU IP core at the Computer Vision Seminar later this month.

Thank you DMF for providing us with this information.

Images courtesy of DMF.

Growing Number of Consumers Expect Internet of Things to Change Connected Homes


The Internet of Things (IoT) is still in its infancy, but manufacturers are speculating that a growing number of people want to enjoy home electronics connected to the Internet, according to a recent survey published by Fortinet.

Sixty-one percent of respondents say a connected home is “extremely likely” to be a reality by 2019.  A whopping 84 percent of survey respondents in China pledged support towards the IoT craze, the report states.

When it comes to IoT security, there are three concerns:  Data loss, malware, and unauthorized access of IoT-connected devices.  Sixty-eight of those surveyed in the U.S. are “extremely concerned” or “somewhat concerned” about data breaches and other security issues stemming from IoT.

Here is what John Maddison, Fortinet VP of Marketing, said in a press statement:

“The Internet of Things promises many benefits to end-users, but also presents grave security and data privacy challenges.  Crossing these hurdles will require clever application of various security technologies, including remove connection authentication, virtual private networks between end-users and their connected home devices, malware and botnet protection, and application security – applied on premises, in the cloud and as an integrated solution by device manufacturers.”

Looking ahead, IoT growth is expected to evolve into a booming industry – research group IDC expects IoT to hit $7.1 trillion by 2020, and companies will need to blend IoT connected home features with strong security and ease-of-use for consumers.

Thank you to Fortinet for providing us with this information

Image courtesy of Digital Trends

Better Connections Offered With Bluetooth 4.1

The Bluetooth Special Interest Group announced the Bluetooth 4.1, which prepares Bluetooth devices for the Internet of Things by laying the groundwork for IP-based connections, similar to the way a router connects to multiple Wi-Fi enabled devices, extending Bluetooth technology’s role as the essential wireless link for the IoT. The new spec also promises better connectivity and larger data transfers.

“Bluetooth Smart technology put us on a rocket ship of growth, with Bluetooth annual product shipment projections skyrocketing to more than 4.5 billion in the next five years,” said Suke Jawanda, Bluetooth SIG CMO. “We updated the Bluetooth specification to address this projected growth, making changes to give developers more control in assigning a role to their product, limiting interference with other wireless technologies, and allowing Bluetooth Smart products to exchange data faster and maintain connections with less manual intervention.”

The Bluetooth 4.1 release brings better cooperation between LTE radios and Bluetooth devices to avoid interference. The release also promises better connections, as reconnection time intervals will be more flexible and variable, thus devices can reconnect automatically when they are in proximity of one another. As an example, the consumer can leave the room and upon returning, two recently used devices reconnect without user intervention.

The technology also supports features like bulk data transfer, such as sensors that gathered data during a run, bike ride or swim can transfer that data more efficiently when the consumer returns home. The new spec adds a standardized way to create a dedicated channel, which could be used for IPv6 communications in the Core Specification.

Thank you Tom’s Hardware for providing us with this information
Image courtesy of cunotic.com