Samsung Printer Orders Itself More Ink When It Starts To Run Low

Amazon is a company known for being at the forefront of technology. With everything from their online streaming service to their hopes for drone deliveries. One of Amazon’s key selling points is their “Prime” service, offering you access to their online video collection and free one-day delivery. One of the lesser known features is the ability to re-order something when you get low, something that can now be built into technology.

Amazon announced its “dash” feature some time ago now, with the press of a button re-ordering your much needed supplies. Covering everything from your washing up and laundry supplies to your office needs, it would now seem that Samsung has caught on and built the function into some of their new printers.

While most printers monitoring ink levels, Samsung’s latest will go that step further and re-order more ink when you start to run low. With the orders at which you re-order cartridges adjustable it won’t be a case of one size fits all, even for your printing habits with hand ins and report deadlines destroying the ink that you thought you had in the printer.

With more and more devices offering the “dash” feature, all you have to remember is to pay and put the replacement where it’s needed. The service means that users don’t have to remember to re-order items, with everything from shaving foam and kitchen roll to Gatorade and nappies being supplied at the press of a button and soon, just by you finishing that last pack you had put away in the cupboard.

“Empty” Epson ink cartridges actually 20% full

 

One common gripe with printers is how expensive ink can be, with costs often surpassing that of an all new printer. Now there are reports out that the Epson 9900, a high-end printer that costs about $5000 starts reporting that ink cartridges are empty while they are still 15-20 percent full. For cartridges that can cost around $4000, that is tantamount to throwing away about $600-$800.

Bellevue Fine Art, long fed up with how the Epson 9900 would stop printing when one cartridge hit “1%” capacity, decided to cut into the supposedly empty cartridges to see just how much ink remained. Not surprisingly, Bellevue Fine Art found that there was a lot ink still left. For the 700ml size, about 100-150ml was left unused while the smaller 350ml size had about 60-80ml remaining. That came about to be about 14-22% of the advertised ink volume left inaccessible.

While having ink left unused might have a technical reason, like protecting the ink heads or just a crappy sensor, having advertised ink volume be unusable is less than optimal. If some 100ml of ink is required to protect the printer heads, maybe Epson should include the extra ink on top of the advertised capacity. Hopefully, Epson, as well as other industry firms like HP and Canon will address this longstanding issue.

HP Tackles ‘Ink Anxiety’ With 50% Reduced Costs and Instant Ink Printers

Low-cost printers from HP, Epson, Brother and more all seem like a superb value-for-money proposition but the cold, hard reality is they are extremely expensive to run due to extortionate ink prices. Often, these budget printers are half the price of official replacement ink cartridges and DIY kits are overly messy. For heavy users, a Laser printer is essential. However, HP’s latest venture could dramatically change the fortune of ink-based printers. The company has decided to tackle ‘ink anxiety’ head-on and reduce cartridge prices by 50%

The scheme works through integrated Wi-Fi, and smart cartridges can detect the remaining ink level before automatically ordering replacements directly from HP. This service is entitled, “instant ink” and pricing starts at a mere £1.99 per month. However, from is a huge word when it comes to consumer pricing so it’s an unknown entity how expensive this service could be on certain models. HP also dispatch a pre-paid package to return your empty cartridges and dispose of them in an environmentally-friendly manner. Stephen Nigro, senior vice president at HP imaging and printing, said in a statement:

“Customers want printing to be affordable, convenient and meaningful.”

“With HP Instant Ink, customers can enjoy low cost of ownership and print what matters most to them without the worry of running out of ink or spending too much.”

This is a wonderful idea and could instigate the beginning of cheap, consumer-friendly cartridges. Not only is the price fantastic, but HP’s commitment to providing simple replacements without requiring any technical knowledge is revolutionary. HP’s customer service team should be able cope with customer demands and ensure replacements are dispatched before any remaining ink runs dry. Hopefully, other manufacturers will follow HP’s lead.

Thank you VentureBeat for providing us with this information.

Nanoparticles Could Lead to Cheaper , Lighter and More Flexible Solar Cells

When hearing the name ‘Colloidal Quantum Dots’, minds fly away to science-fiction scenarios and technologies far from reach. Actually, the name has been given to a new form of solid nanoparticles.

It is said that the newly discovered nanoparticles could eventually contribute to the creation of cheaper, lighter and more flexible solar cells. A few examples were also given, having the nanoparticles in question considered to make better sensors, infrared lasers, remote controls, LEDs and even satellites.

The colloidal quantum dots were discovered at the University of Toronto by a group of scientists led by researcher Zhijun Ning and professor Ted Sargent, having the group achieve more efficient light absorption in the material by solving a problem in which a type of semiconductor would lose its electrons when exposed to the oxygen in the air. In the end, the group came up with the new material which remains rich in electrons despite being exposed to the oxygen.

The scientists find a lot of potential in the colloidal quantum dots, having been stated that they could eventually be added to inks or paints. Considering the latter, roofs and other buildings could eventually become solar panels themselves, leading to cheaper solar power and electricity.

However, the technology is not yet fully understood and tested. Considering its potential though, a lot of indie entrepreneurs should be extremely eager to get their hands on the new technology and flood the Kickstarter campaigns with new ideas and gadgets.

Thank you CNET for providing us with this information
Image courtesy of CNET