Instant Shelters For When Times Are Bad

We’ve all seen the news, sometimes they just seem to be filled with doom and gloom telling us how climate change is going to flood our homes and the beaches that we love to spread our toes on when it gets sunny. To combat this threat technology has created some amazing little shelters, designed to be deployed in just a moment to help protect people when their most vulnerable from the environment.

The Better Shelter

The Better Shelter is designed as a “modular” housing system. With four windows and a lockable door, the concept behind the shelter is to be quickly deployed to create a safe and secure environment for people running from people or the weather. Solar panels are installed on the roof in order to power the lights within the structure, lasting four hours when at full charge, or less if you use the USB port included to charge your much needed mobile phone.

Reaction Housing Exo Shelter

Designed as a home away from home, the Exo is built for the simple purpose of providing shelter. With only two pieces to clip together, once the floor is met by the shell and plugged into a power system you have four fold down beds with a variety of controls including LED lighting and climate controls. Worried about people entering your Exo? Worry not as the doors is locked and unlocked through NFC bracelets and key cards.

Daiwa Lease: EDV-01

Daiwa Lease is known for creating structures but the EDV-01 is something a little different. Designed to be no bigger than a shipping container during transport, a press of a button releases the hydraulic lift that raises the outer shell to create a two-tiered structure in less than half a minute. Designed for quick deployment where needed, the EDV-01 deploys to contain everything you might need. With showers, toilets, and a kitchenette you can enjoy modern comforts with the second floor being dedicated to your personal space. Solar panels on the roof mean that these temporary structures can be used as offices or shelters, helping not only shelter people but create a base where they can recover.

Sky Mile Tower Aims To Reinvent The Skyscraper

The evolution of the humble skyscraper has been nothing short of amazing over the last half a century, from the US and its range of towering buildings that have included the “Trump international Tower” which stands at an eye- watering 423 metres tall (1,389ft) to the current king which is situated in Dubai and goes by the name the “Burj Khalifa“, this structure stands at an incredible 829.8 metres (2,722ft).

Surely this will not be beaten? Well, apparently it might well be after it was recently announced that a new structure is in the planning stage and goes by the name the “Sky Mile Tower”, below is a summary concerning this proposed building.

  • The Sky Mile Tower will have a hexagonal design.
  • The Sky Mile Tower building will be around 1 mile high
  • The Sky Mile Tower is expected to house 55,000 people
  • The Sky Mile Tower will be surrounded by a series of hexagonal designed man-made islands.

Below is the concept computer generated designs for this new building, as you can see, they are certainly exciting. The islands will also be used with the aim of both protecting the city from flooding and also acting as a foundation for homes with the potential to house 500,000 people, the building is also earmarked for the city of Tokyo.

There will also be various multilevel sky lobbies that will house among other things restaurants, gyms and various health clinics. This all sounds amazing, but, there is one slight caveat when you consider the estimated completion of construction is expected to be around 2045.

Below is the current world’s tallest building, in case you’re wondering, it is the one on the left.

It will be interesting to note if there will ever be a limit to how far a skyscraper can go, after all, there surely has to be a ceiling.

Images courtesy of burjkhalifa and metro

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Architects Crowdfunding for £1.85 Billion to Build Minas Tirith

The UK is in the grip of a housing crisis and few new homes are being built. Existing council houses are being sold off at the expense of low-income families. What to do? Incite a public movement to build social housing, or spend close to £2 billion on a life-size replica of Minas Tirith, the fortress city from The Lord of the Rings? A group of UK architects are opting for the latter, launching an Indiegogo crowdfunding page, seeking £1.85 billion ($2.9 billion) to “Realise Minas Tirith”.

The seven-level walled city, capital of Gondor, was the location of a siege by the evil forces of Mordor during the Battle of Pelennor Fields in the third of The Lord of the Rings trilogy, The Return of the King. The architects behind the crowdfunding campaign want to recreate the location – part living space, part tourist attraction – in the South of England, which they see including “both residential and commercial properties, allowing for sustainable growth and a high quality of life.”

The Indiegogo post boasts that “Residential properties will be categorised by tier, quality and size. Tiers vary from 1-5, quality varies from 2-5 stars, with the higher star denoting higher quality, and size varies from 1-4 bedrooms. A “3.4.2 property”, for instance, would be located in the 3rd tier of the city, be of a 4 star quality and have 2 bedrooms – perfect for a young family.”

Having raised only £17,700 of its £1.85 billion target with 48 days to go, Minas Tirith seems unlikely to solve the UK’s housing crisis anytime soon.

Thank you The Daily Dot for providing us with this information.

Wales Has First ‘Energy Positive’ House in Britain

Wales has become home to Britain’s first ‘energy positive’ house, so-called because it can generate a surplus of electricity which its owner can then sell on. The three-bedroom detached property in Cenin, South Wales, cost £125,000 to build, according to its designers from Cardiff University.

The house is lined with heavy insulation to retain heat during cold months, with solar panels covering the roof and mounted in the garden. For eight months of the year, the house is expected to generate £75 more electricity than it will use, which can then be sold back to the national grid or stored within the property’s batteries.

It was developed to serve the low-carbon housing bill, proposed by Labour in 2006. Current Conservative Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne, however, has recently scrapped the bill. “It was disappointing to see Osborne scrap the plans,” said Professor Phil Jones of the Welsh School of Architecture. “But the devolved Welsh, Scottish and Northern Irish governments can set their own building standards. One reason we built this house was to demonstrate to builders that you could meet the standards at an affordable price with off-the-shelf technology. The housebuilders could do it too if they wanted to.”

Jones says that building his ‘energy positive’ design en masse could bring the cost of each property down to £100,000. “We save money and space by making the photovoltaic panels the roof itself and by dispensing with radiators and making the air collector part of the wall,” he added. “The building demonstrates our leading edge low carbon supply, storage and demand technologies at a domestic scale which we hope will be replicated in other areas of Wales and the UK in the future.”

Thank you The Guardian for providing us with this information.