Do We Inhabit Within A Giant Hologram?

The principles which govern our universe is still open to debate within the science community, from quantum mechanics, which is a theory suggesting that of a formalism underlying the description of all physical systems to the holographic principle.

This principle suggests and “mathematically determines our Universe is just two-dimensional, however it appears three-dimensional due to the holographic effect whereby the Universe behaves like a giant hologram. Due to this giant hologram everything that we see around us is just a projection of a two-dimensional surface”. Still awake? Good, new research which has aimed to test the validity of this principle has been undertaken by Austrian researchers which have been able to show that this holographic principle has validity for a much more realistic outlook of our galaxy.

This latest theory which has been devised by researchers at the Vienna University of Technology describes a “holographic principle which works in a flat spacetime along with the theoretical regions with negative curvature”. This is fascinating but does need to be re read one or two times in order to understand the viewpoint.

It’s incredible that these theories are able to be investigated by the science community with the aim of understanding more about our universe. A compelling statement by Max Riegler of Vienna University explains that “This calculation affirms our assumption that the holographic principle can also be realized in flat spaces” it will be interesting to see further developments within these equations.

Thank you Techworm and tuwien university for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of howstuffworks

How to Make a 3D Hologram Using Your Smartphone

An industrious tech reviewer has developed a very cool method for turning your smartphone into a 3D hologram projector. Mrwhosetheboss posted his process to YouTube, which effectively creates a homemade version of portable hologram generator Holho. Want to give it a try? Let’s talk you through it.

You will need:

  • Graph paper
  • CD case
  • Tape or Super Glue
  • Pen
  • Scissors
  • Smartphone
  • Knife or Glass Cutter

Start off by drawing this pattern on the graph paper:

Break the edges off the CD case:

Then trace the outline of the shape you drew on the graph paper onto the CD case:

Cut the shape out with your knife:

Repeat three more times, until you have four trapeziums.

Stick the shapes together with tape to form a pyramid, without the peak:

Though Mrwhosetheboss lists tape or Super Glue, he stresses that the gluing the pieces together is very difficult.

Load up a hologram-specific video on your phone, and place your newly constructed pyramid in the centre of the image:

There are numerous custom videos to achieve this task to be found on YouTube, such as the one used above, created by Cospe S.a.s., creator of the Holho.

Thank you Mashable for providing us with this information.

High-Definition Holograms Might Hit The Market As Early As Next Year

When thinking about holograms, the first thought is about movies and science-fiction books where most have encountered the described technology for the first time, knowing it is just a fictional technological thought or concept. A startup company based in California tends to change this in a fairly small amount of time.

Ostendo is a company claiming to have solved the problems faced with hologram technology with the help of 5,000 PPI projectors measuring in at just about the size of a Tic Tac. The projectors are said to be able to control the colour, brightness and angle of individual beams of light across 1,000,000 pixels.

The company states that one chip is capable of delivering a usable image, but multiple chips are said to make room for even more complex and detailed images. Recent news indicate that The Wall Street Journal received a demo of this amazing technology, having it beam green dice spinning in the air.

Though the technology is still in its early stages, the company is said to deliver a chip capable of rendering 2D images on a surface of up to 48-inches at first. However, Hussein S. El-Ghoroury, the founder of Ostendo, stated that the company will be able to produce a chip capable of rendering “consistent” 3D objects in mid-air just months after the first chip’s release.

The technology did not go unnoticed, having already stirred the attention of some major handset manufacturers. Also, Ostendo is already looking forward into enhancing the product by reducing the pixel size to be able to boost the image resolution of its holograms, as well as thinking of ways to embed its technology into TVs, smartwatches and even tablets.

Thank you Endgadget for providing us with this information
Image courtesy of Endgadget

Giant STOP Sign Projected Onto A Makeshift Waterfall

We’ve all been in a vehicle and found ourselves cursing at other drivers due to their negligent driver skills, or lack of, right? Whether it be the forgetfulness of having indicators to tell other drivers which direction they are turning or the lack of not reading road signs appropriately; mainly STOP signs.

Now imagine if these particular drivers were confronted with a huge image of a STOP sign that they simply couldn’t ignore. A lighting show company Laservision have developed a technology which consists of laser-projecting a STOP sign onto makeshift waterfall and have been experimenting with the technology since 2007 in Australia.

The technology comes to light after a truck driver ignored warning signs and almost wedged his vehicle in the Sydney Harbour Tunnel reports 10 news. Described as a water curtain, the Australian government are hoping to stop tall vehicles such as trucks from attempting to pass under tunnels which simply aren’t tall enough.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NoTMC-uxJoo[/youtube]

Image courtesy of 10 News (YouTube)