The Sensel Morph Takes a New Approach on Input Devices

We have had the keyboard and mouse as input devices for quite a while, and while they are some of the best and optimal ways, they are somewhat outdated and could use a refresh. There have been many attempts on new input methods, but none really stuck. We do have touch screens now, but let’s face it, they still suck big time in response times and don’t offer any improvement to productivity.

A new KickStarter project has set out to change that with a reinvention of known technologies into a new form of input device. The Sensel Morph is the first pressure-sensitive, multi-touch input device that enables users to interact with the digital world in a way that wasn’t possible up until now.

The Sensel Morph is using a patented pressure grid technology and with its high dynamic range of force sensitivity, the Sensel Morph can detect not just your fingers but any object from a paintbrush to a drumstick. One of the great things is that it works as it is out of the box with most devices and applications. It is further hackable for those who wish to get more out of the device and use it for completely new scenarios.

It comes with a micro USB to normal USB cable for use with computers, it can connect to tablets and smartphones with Bluetooth, and you can even connect it to Arduino developers boards to create completely new and ingenious devices with input options that just weren’t possible up until now.

The Sensel Morph got its name for a good reason as it can morph into almost anything. Drum computers, musical keyboards, normal keyboards, design interfaces; it is all changeable with smart overlays. The overlays are automatically detected and completely optional to use. The Overlays are physical apps made of a thin, flexible layer that you can place over the device to provide a visual map and tactile feedback for each modes unique functionality.

It is basically old techniques that were refined and morphed together for a new product that is hard to describe. I think the introduction video below can do that a lot better thanks to the visual aid; I know that I’d sure like a couple of these.

You can also check out how various professionals can use the Sensel Morph in the videos below. Use it as paint surface, turn it into a music creator, or build you completely own devices. There aren’t many limitations for the Sensel Morph.

The project has already been successfully funded, but there are still 37 days left to get in on the Kickstarter. Early bird specials are gone and a single Sensel Morph and three overlays of your choice will set you back $249. There are also multi-packages available for those who wish to extend with more than one. Check it out and start dreaming of all the amazing things you could do with this new input device.

This Is Why New Software Comes With Old Flaws

You are probably wondering why we hear that legacy flaws are still present in new software. Well, the answer is simple. Developers have a habit of reusing old code for most of their projects and the code is not reviewed for all potential flaws, but rather the approach tends to be similar to the slang ‘if it works, then don’t try to fix it’.

This does not mean that developers are lazy. The approach is favourable even by top-notch programmers because of the tight deadlines they have to meet, so time will always be above everything else when shipping new software.

However, this comes at a hefty price. While we hear of many hacking incidents, only a few of them are complex enough to break even the most impenetrable systems. Most of them were done by exploiting the already ‘implanted’ flaws in all software products. Everything except the operating systems can be deemed ‘hackable’ by most people with some knowledge of hacking.

The flaws go so deep that even some government departments are at high risk. Security analyst found out that some software in government departments is still based on older programming languages. But is this the future of programming? Of course not.

Security analysts in the field say that the problems with legacy flaws may likely increase, but they don’t have to. The real problem is that, by focusing exclusively on shoving new software on the market, companies forget about security completely. A better approach here is to split project development into two major components, development and testing, which could work in parallel. This way, a lot of bugs could be fixed and major security bugs flagged before the software hits the market.

Thank you CNET for providing us with this information

Image courtesy of nikopik