NVIDIA DRIVE PX2 Powered by Two GP106 Chips

NVIDIA showed of its DRIVE PX 2 system – the new iteration of its autonomous and driver assistance AI platform – at last week’s GTC 2016 conference, and eagle-eyed viewers may have noticed that the board shown to the audience by CEO Jen-Hsun Huang was sporting a pair of integrated GP106 GPUs, eschewing the two Maxwell-based NVIDIA Tegra X1 chips that powered the original DRIVE PX, and confirming a rumour that we reported last week.

The GP106 runs on NVIDIA’s new Pascal architecture – set to hit the market in the latest line of GeForce graphics cards this Summer – which can perform at 24 DL TOPS or 8 TFLOPS, and features up to 4GB GDDR5.

NVIDIA hopes that the new DRIVE PX 2 will power the next generation of driverless cars – the DRIVE PX has so far only be used to power the ‘infotainment’ system on-board a Tesla, for example – and has already shipped to a number of unnamed Tier 1 customers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KnVVJSIiKpY

“DRIVE PX platforms are built around deep learning and include a powerful framework (Caffe) to run DNN models designed and trained on NVIDIA DIGITS,” according to NVIDIA. “DRIVE PX also includes an advanced computer vision (CV) library and primitives. Together, these technologies deliver an impressive combination of detection and tracking.”

NVIDIA Show Off Everest – VR Goes Further

GTC 2016: NVIDIA have started their keynote for GTC 2016 by explaining the benefits of VR outside of gaming. They did this by showing what was done when they took one of the world’s most valued treasures and attempted to recreate it; Mount Everest.

The geometry used reflects every aspect of the mountain through the ice and snow to the way that each individual flake separates and swirls around in the wind. This amounts to over 108 billion pixels being used to supply the very best experience for the user and this is just the start of VR outside of gaming to give the user an experience that is unparalleled.

Looking forward to other areas allows NVIDIA to focus on some of the worlds wonders and bringing it to the user as an experience that they would generally not be able to see in an average lifetime.

To see what the fuss is about, check out the video below.