Turtle Beach Grip 300 Optical Gaming Mouse Kit Review

Introduction


When we visited Turtle Beach at CES 2015, we were amazed to see a full range of gaming keyboards and mice, especially given that Turtle Beach has spent so many years focusing on the audio market. I was eager to see what they could do and since then, we’ve already been impressed by their GRIP 500 gaming mouse, so today I’m really looking forward to see what their next product, the GRIP 300 is capable of.

“The Turtle Beach Grip 300 optical gaming mouse is an affordable, ergonomically engineered 5-button scroll-wheel mouse that uses quality components such as the Avago 3050 optical sensor and Omron switches to deliver smooth, precise control. Its compact sculpted body sports an illuminated logo and scroll wheel, and hardware switches to adjust DPI from 500 to 1750 and polling rate from 125 to 1000Hz. Plug and play for both PC and Mac® right out of the box, there are no drivers to load or software to run. And its non-slip soft-touch coating enhances grip control and increases gamer endurance.”

The GRIP 300 comes will all the features you would expect from a gaming mouse, but with a few nice extras given its respective price range. As you can see below, the GRIP 300 box is a little wide, making room for the DRIFT mouse mat, which comes bundled with it.

On the interior of the box, you can actually touch the mouse, which is great for those who are picking up the box at retail, as it allows you to test the main switches, scroll wheel and feel the surface finish on it.

The mouse mat is of a very high quality, with a smooth finish, hard-wearing surface and stitched edges to prevent them from fraying.

Unlike the plastic cable of the GRIP 500, the 300 comes equipped with a high-quality braided cable and a gold-plated USB header, which should help improve the overall lifespan of the mouse.

In terms of design, the GRIP 300 is pretty straight forward with few buttons on show, something that may appeal to the pro gaming market, who often prefer simple designs for competitive gaming.

There’s a nice ergonomic shape to the mouse, like the design of the GRIP 500. Although, unlike the GRIP 500, the 300 only has two side buttons, not three.

The GRIP 300, much like its name implies, has been treated to a grip coating. This hard-wearing rubber-like surface has a really nice feel to it and it’ll also benefit those who suffer from sweaty hands while gaming.

There’s a good quality scroll wheel with a soft rubber grip around it and a soft tactile bump when rotated, making it very easy to control.

Overall, not the most exciting design, but build quality feels good, the design is aesthetically pleasing and the switches have a nice quick and responsive click to them, which will be great for gaming.

While the top side of the mouse may be lacking a lot of controls, that’s not to say the features are limited. Here you’ll find switches for adjusting the polling rate, as well as the DPI settings. Of course, you’ll also find the optical sensor.

Turtle Beach Grip 500 Laser Gaming Mouse and Drift Mouse Mat Review

Introduction


At the start of this year, we visited Turtle Beach at CES 2015 and one thing in particular caught our attention, keyboards and mice! Turtle Beach has a long history of creating gaming focused headsets for a wide range of formats, but until now, that’s pretty much all they’ve done. Now, just a few months after they were first revealed, Turtle Beach are looking to tackle the PC gaming market with a range of keyboards and mice.

“The Turtle Beach Grip 500 laser gaming mouse is an ergonomically engineered, illuminated 7-button scroll wheel mouse that uses premium components such as Avago 9800 laser sensors and Omron switches to deliver steady, precise gaming control. It packs a number of powerful features, including the ability to customize performance, change illumination settings, program all seven buttons and the scroll wheel, plus create up to 50 complex macros with up to 100 commands each and then assign them to any button. They can then be saved into five different colour-coded profiles, loaded into on-board memory and changed on the fly.”

It certainly has all the hallmarks of a good gaming mouse, with all the features you would expect, but what we really want to see, is how it feels and how it performs, so let’s get right to it and take a closer look.

For the purpose of this review, Turtle Beach also sent me one of their new DRIFT mouse mats, I don’t typically review these, as they’re really down to user preference, but it seems like it’ll be a nice match for the GRIP 500 mouse.

For those looking at this mouse at retail, there’s a cut-away section that allows you to test the buttons, scroll wheel and feel the finish on the mouse.

In the box, you’ll find the GRIP 500, which comes hard-wired with a lightweight cable and the instruction booklet; not the most comprehensive bundle, but it’s really all you need.

The cable is of a good quality, no gold-plated connector, but honestly, you really don’t need it to be gold anyway.

The main panels of the GRIP 500 have been treated to a grippy soft-touch rubber. This is quite common on gaming mice these days, as it gives improved grip, a stealthy aesthetic and it’s often quite resilient to scratches and easy to keep clean.

Down the left side, you’ll find three switches, which just like the rest of the switches, are fully programmable. They’ve got a nice light tactile click to them that gives them a nice responsive feel.

The rear of the mouse sweeps out a little at the base on both the left and right sides, giving a nice ergonomic shape that fits the palm of your hand well.

There’s a slight curve to both the left and right mouse buttons, providing a stable finger resting position and combined with the grip coating, the mouse feels just as adept at both palm rest and claw grip play-styles.

There’s a single toggle switch behind the scroll wheel that can be used for DPI, or anything else you wish since it’s also fully programmable. The scroll wheel is very low set in the mouse body, but it is quite big and features a very grippy coating and ridges that make it very easy to manipulate.

A small Turtle Beach logo at the back, which will look nice when powered up thanks to some internal LED lighting.

The 500 GRIP, contrary to its name, glides exceptionally well on both soft and hard gaming surfaces, that’s to its slip-mats and its relatively lightweight design.

Valve VR Demo Looks Similar to Myst, Only Extremely Detailed

Valve’s virtual reality setup only allowed you to walk in areas the size of small rooms. This is really an issue today, since a lot of titles, especially fantasy ones, come in vast environments full of rich graphics.

The solution seems to come from Cloudhead Games’ The Gallery: Six Elements, which is all about interaction. The demo can be experienced using the HTC Vive’s hand controllers in order to grip all sort of objects, having the objective to fix a creaky machine. However, there is also danger in this quest, and it comes under the shape of a giant tree monster.

“The Gallery: The Six Elements is a first­person fantasy/exploration game built from the ground up for virtual reality, using the Unity engine; incorporating various VR and interaction hardware devices. This title will present a rich narrative experience fuelled by intuitive physical interaction puzzles, nestled within a deeply immersive environment. Drawing from our inspirations of 80′s adventure movies and classic games such as Monkey Island and Myst, the player must journey through foreign and fantastical worlds, collecting elemental powers and items that will aid them in discovering the mystery of the Machine.”

It is said that there are a few different environments in the demo as well, giving the user a lot of places to explore aside from things to collect. Though The Gallery is not yet available, it is said that it will be released along with Valve and HTC’s system at the end of this year.

Thank you Kotaku for providing us with this information

Swiftpoint GT – Slide Gesture Mouse Announced

Interactive change has come to peripherals – the Swiftpoint GT has been reportedly constructed in a bid to change the way we look at mice design which has followed common trends since it’s inception in 1964. Said to ensure your fingers can ‘become the mouse’, this product is marketed as a step into the future for computing interface technology. It’s being talked up a lot – can it live up to the hype?

The Swiftpoint GT is a compact and convenient mouse which combined natural touch gestures through a blue booth connection to your computer. Designed to offer two modes, point-and-click and touch gesture, this product has been developed in order to combat against the commonly seen Repetitive Strain Injury, Occupational Excessive Syndrome and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome seen within office workers, tech enthusiasts and professional gamers of today’s age.

The new design is said to be better for your body, allowing you to grip the mouse like a pen regardless of your hand size. Also claiming to increase your Microsoft Power Point, Word and Excel efficiency, the claims of this product get more and more outlandish as we read on.

Coming in at 23 grams and measuring 5.6cm x 4.3cm x 3.3cm, the Swiftpoint GT requires a smaller amount of operable space, due to its intended usage nature. This is marketed as an extensive positive when compared to small and somewhat clumsy Bluetooth mice of today, giving living giants like myself (6ft 5inch) the all-too-common hand cramps associated with poor design.

We’ll share with you a product release video below, please let us know your thoughts. I’d certainly like to test one, but I don’t think it’s going to make it into my Dota2 or CS:GO matchmaking games just yet. Short of making you a morning coffee, this mouse can apparently do it all.

Images courtesy of Chiphell