Scientists Use Fibre Optic Cable to Transmit 57Gbps

How fast is your internet? 1Mbps? 10Mbps? Are you lucky enough to get a 1Gbps? With governments all over the world now racing to deliver the best internet to everyone, the speed of your internet is quickly becoming a topic of hot debate. For those with speed hate, I am sorry. It would now seem that it is possible to transmit 57Gbps down a fibre optic cable. Sorry.

I apologise because like many I am someone who has been promised great speeds, but more often than not you find those speeds don’t seem to exist and you can almost hear that digital bleeping from dial-up coming to haunt you as you call it a night, letting your movie buff or your game download.

Researchers from the University of Illinois have pushed fibre optic technology to a new level by transmitting 57 gigabytes of data per second through a fibre optic cable, a whole 17 Gbps extra compared to those reported last year. What’s better about this you ask? The speed was achieved with no errors and then to prove the point they went and send 50Gbps while at temperatures of 85 degrees celsius.

The reason the temperature is important is because electrical components get warm over time (like the bottom of the laptop you’ve had resting on your lap while watching Netflix in bed), which can lead to reduced performance and damaged components. The team behind the idea hope that by showing that these speeds are available from room temperature to 85 degrees, companies will have no reason to push these systems out to the public.

You can read the paper that’s been published on the experiments here and begin to imagine how many games you could delete and download at 50 Gbps. So many games.

UK Needs Faster Internet Says Business Leaders Group

Buffering, downloading, pausing, even trying to make out the shapes on a low-resolution video have become common place for so many people as their internet speed caps out, normally before they are anywhere near their advertised (and purchased) speeds. It seems that we aren’t the only ones annoyed by this though as a group of business leaders have spoken out now, accusing the UK government of creating a “poverty of ambition” for internet speeds.

The Institute of Directors (IoD) is formed from business leaders within the UK, and in their report titled Ultrafast Britain, they state that the UK is lagging behind when it comes to enabling faster broadband connections. The government states that 90% of UK properties have access to superfast speeds, with that reaching 95% by next year.

The IoD don’t think this is good enough, with them calling for speeds of 10 gigabits per second (Gbps) by 2030. Currently, the government wants just 10 megabits per second by 2020, a speed which many are already getting.

This isn’t the first time that the internet as a structured provision has been discussed this week, with Ofcom telling BT that its cable network should be opened up to other companies. Currently, BT contains two parts, the core company and Openreach, the part of the company responsible for the cable, fibre and network infrastructure that the UK relies on for its internet.

What is your internet speed? Is it ever what you were actually advertised to be getting? Do you know anyone with super fast/slow internet and does it have a big impact on them?

Republican Senators Argue With FCC Over 25Mbps Broadband

On Thursday, a group of republican senators expressed an issue with the Federal Communications commission, or rather their definition of a service. The item in question is broadband and the fact that in order to qualify in their reports they are now required to provide 25Mbps Broadband.

Citing popular sites like Netflix and Amazon in their letter, they argue that services like these only require a fraction of the speed that the FCC now say is the baseline to classify as broadband internet. The speed in question is 25 Mbps, a speed I know a lot of people would be happy to pay for if it was stable at even a fraction of that speed.

Broadbands definition was redefined as 25 Mbps last year, raising from only 4Mbps. The difference being fundamental to the FCC given that they are required to act if not enough people have access to this service. The reason they stated for the update was because the old speed was “dated and inadequate”, with more devices connected to each household now you could often see several people connecting and using services like Netflix at the same time.

In their latest report, 10% didn’t have access to the 25Mbps speed that was required to be considered Broadband. Something which may be easier to help with if the FCC was consistent across the board the senators argue. While using 25 Mbps for reporting on broadband levels, if you are applying for Connect America Funds the benchmark is only 10 Mbps. These funds are designed to help connect people and allow companies to offer services to as many people as possible, but clearly only offering 10 Mbps is far from the 25 Mbps you will require according to the new standards.

Valve Increasing Steam’s Speed With 100 Gbps Connections

Steam is a global name in video games. As a platform for everything from selling games to networking players, the service enables you to download a small client and regain access to a collection of thousands of games. Not surprising then that they’ve recruited Level 3 communications to increase their network speed.

Level 3 deliver a collection of high-speed connections all around the world, a service that Steam users will be able to enjoy soon as Valve has approached Level 3 to upgrade their network to include their “100 gigabits per second” connection. They state several good reasons for this upgrade, the first of which is the service’s growth year on year. With a 75% increase year on year, you can imagine how their servers must be with new games released causing massive spikes of downloads. 400-500 petabytes of data are downloaded worldwide per month with 4-5 exabytes being downloaded per year, a figure that will only increase with games increasing in average size year on year. With Steam games coming from MB’s to GB’s the “standard” for Steam is roughly 10-40 gigabytes per user download. This is quite hefty given the service has over 100 million users, with users often being online at peak times such as during sales in which it’s not uncommon for millions of users to be online at the same time.

During those busy times, you may quickly notice that your connection stays at peak performance with such an array of upgrades coming soon. Now if only we could all get stable, fast internet at homes it would help make that game time less stressful.

Triple The Speed But US Still Lags In Internet Speed Comparisons

One of the most competitive things you can mention is your internet speed. Being able to download and watch your latest games and movies at the press of a button relies on a steady and speedy connection, something that few have. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) have released a report that shows something that might upset some people, even though all it does is say your internet is more than likely faster than it used to be.

The report states that between March 2011 and September 2014 internet speeds within the US tripled, jumping from 10MBPS to 31MBPS. While this may sound amazing, in comparison to other countries like Canada and Japan the US still ranks 25 out of 39 countries as stated by a study in 2013.

While this all sounds amazing you have to remember just how much extra bandwidth people are using on an everyday basis. With the FCC estimating that over 60% of internet traffic is video, estimated to rise to over 80% by 2019, you may need that fiber optic broadband sooner than you think. Don’t forget that the next big thing is 4k, with such a data consuming technology set (or at least many hope) to become the new standard you could soon see speeds of MBPS not being enough to catch up with your favourite shows or watch that new Netflix or Prime movie.

ASRock Announce X99 WS-E/10G Motherboard – 22 Gbps NIC

Large scale motherboard manufacturer ASRock has just released their new X99 motherboard, the X99 WS-E/10G – featuring an amazing on-board network interface capabilities of 22 Gbps.

It’s able to achieve such speeds due to its two included Intel I210AT Gigabit Ethernet controllers, coupled with a dual 10-GIGE network interface provided by a single-chip Intel X540. This brings to mind a popular ‘Xzhibit meme’ which would read something like – “Yo dawg, I heard you like NIC’s, so I put a NIC on your NIC so you can network while you network.” This amalgamation of chips result in a blisteringly fast transfer peak speed of 22 Gbps, which will out-match your data drives and internet connection in an instant – it’s time for them to catch up!

ASRock has reportedly released some tests showing the fast transfer speeds in action, likening it to Google Fiber’s 1 Gbps offering and claiming its superiority to this service.

Alongside this NIC offering, ASRock’s new X99 motherboard gives you seven expansion slots (supporting Quad CrossFire and SLI configurations), 12 SATA ports and the ability to utilize up to Xenon Processor models E5 v3 (Haswell-EP) and 128GB of ECC memory.

Given this information, it seems that ASRock has provided us with a solid server option – however there is no mention of retail price, so don’t hold your breath just yet. Even though the 22 Gbps NIC offering is a bit of a gimmick and will vastly outmatch most, if not all, hardware in your possession – it’s nice that the NIC is no longer a bottleneck on our networks. Remember the days of a 10 Mbps card? We do, it sucked.

Image courtesy of Chiphell

Huawei: 5G Will Be Here By 2020 – Speeds Up To 100X Faster Than 4G

4G has now been implemented around the globe in major cities for just over a year now. Looking for constant advancement in technology, Huawei have claimed that their new 5G infrastructure and technology will reach 100 times the speed of 4G by the year 2020.

As we reported, Huawei have announced their plans for a 4.5G opening in China by 2016, so this information coming to light is quite interesting. Will 4.5G still be worked on, or is Huawei looking to skip it and reach straight for the stars? 4.5G is set to provide the average user with 100Mbps speeds stable and support up to 30,000,000 connections per tower – set to be somewhat of a ‘patch’ for the current 4G offering, which often experiences connectivity, signal and data transfer issues.

In comes 5G, claiming a 10Gps peak transfer speed – quite possibly faster than your phone can process. Coming from backward Australia, I can only dream of a day when internet will out-perform things like your computers HDD speeds or LAN infrastructure – with 5G in the pipeline, it seems like somewhat of a reality.

As with all new major advancements in technology from 4K cable streaming to 10km data “fricken lasers”, the cost of the research, installment and implementation is always something to consider. Taking a look at 4G speeds currently, they’re amazing and offer the user with speeds that are likely much faster than their current ADSL2+ offering, but are extremely expensive. An Australian eSports group called ACL PRO often experience issues with venue internet being poor in Australia – meaning that they have to run their StarCraft II tournaments via multiple 4G ‘wireless sticks’ – seeing hundreds of dollars worth of data transfer flushed down the drain per event. Wouldn’t it be amazing if one day, we could do away with home line ADSL style internet and simply power our whole houses infrastructure simply by walking inside with our mobile phone? Until then, enjoy thousands of dollars a month in downloads of shareware programs and creative commons music through your 4G connection – if you can even get one.

Back to the topic at hand, 5G is set to allow you to reach speeds of up to 10Gpbs, we’ve decided to list out the speeds below to give you an easily viewable comparison of past and future technology.

  • 2G: A few hundred k per second
  • 3G: Up to a few M per second
  • 4G: Two hundred M per second
  • 5G:  10Gbps

Chinese Ministry of Industry and Information Technology Chief Engineer Zhang Feng has announced that the global information and communications industry is ushering in a new wave of innovation, cloud computing, networking and other technologies alongside the rapid redevelopment of new applications. All said to be supported by an amazing 5G mobile internet infrastructure.

We will continue to report as the story develops.

Image courtesy of TNW

New World Record for Wireless Speed – 100 Gbit/s

Lets admit it, the dream of having Google Fibre in our homes to give us a super fast connection to the internet is for the most part a dream, but to take the biscuit, if you want it fast you must have wires connecting everything – or do you? Thanks to those crazy German scientists, the need to have a wire to serve your Gigabit fibre connection from point A-B is no longer a necessity with a new wireless speed that can run at a whopping 100 Gbit/s – that’s right, 100x times as fast as Googles Fibre service.

After setting a record of 40Gbit/s only a few months ago, a joint team from the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics (IAF) and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) set upon the task of taking the speed right up to 11. With this new record of speed, there is the capability at hand to transfer an entire Blu-ray film in under two seconds, but with the signals running at a mind-boggling frequency of 237.5GHz (nearly 50x the frequency of the current Wireless-n standard) there is one slight catch – the range.

As users of 2.4GHz and 5GHz dual band networks will know, the higher frequency signals and walls really do not mix so as you can imagine, running at a frequency this high means that you can have virtually nothing in the way – in fact you are almost in a situation where the two ends have to be able to see each other just to operate. I’m sure that a number of you are wondering what the point in this tech is in reality – after all fibre cables can transfer data at super fast rates already – but there are a large number of situations where fibre is just not an option. With the need for bandwidth growing at an exponential rate and the amount of data that we are working with as well, this technology has the capability to provide super fast data ‘pipelines’ to areas where laying fibre is just not possible – either due to cost or environmental restrictions.

“By employing optical and electrical multiplexing techniques, i.e., by simultaneously transmitting multiple data streams, and by using multiple transmitting and receiving antennas, the data rate could be multiplied. Hence, radio systems having a data rate of 1 terabit per second appear to be feasible” – These are the words of Swen König – one of the projects researchers. Lets face it, dial-up is slow, but now my 80Mbps fibre connection at home seems like its out of date already.

Source: Gizmodo