G.Skill Announce High Speed DDR4 Memory Kit

The extreme performance memory giant, G.Skill, proudly announced yet another extreme speed DDR4 memory kit. We’ve recently seen memory manufacturers hit over 3000MHz in consumer memory kits; G.Skill then took it up a notch, up to 3666MHz at only 1.35v. This is a first of its kind memory kit; high-speed, 16GB (4x4GB) using premium class Samsung 4GB IC chips.

 This speed was validated on a Gigabyte X99 SOC Champion motherboard, the Ripjaws 4 DDR4-3666MHz memory kit pushes the high-end X99 chipset to new levels of performance.
DDR4 has come a very long way since release back in August 2014. We all know that the limiting factor of the Intel X99 CPU and motherboards are the other components; this new 3666MHz speed has given a glimpse of what that platform can really do. This speed means you can have the ultimate gaming system of workstation with the ability to run smoother than ever before. 

The G.Skill 3666MHz memory kit is equipped with the latest Intel XMP 2.0; a standard that was developed for the X99 platform. This means enthusiasts and overclockers can overclock this memory kit to boost their system with 100% stability with ease.

Like all of the G.Skill memory kit range, this kit includes G.Skill’s limited lifetime warranty; with support via online forums, emails and telephone.

Are you looking to upgrade your memory? Are you waiting for Intel Skylake before you take the plunge? Let us know in the comments.

Huawei: 5G Will Be Here By 2020 – Speeds Up To 100X Faster Than 4G

4G has now been implemented around the globe in major cities for just over a year now. Looking for constant advancement in technology, Huawei have claimed that their new 5G infrastructure and technology will reach 100 times the speed of 4G by the year 2020.

As we reported, Huawei have announced their plans for a 4.5G opening in China by 2016, so this information coming to light is quite interesting. Will 4.5G still be worked on, or is Huawei looking to skip it and reach straight for the stars? 4.5G is set to provide the average user with 100Mbps speeds stable and support up to 30,000,000 connections per tower – set to be somewhat of a ‘patch’ for the current 4G offering, which often experiences connectivity, signal and data transfer issues.

In comes 5G, claiming a 10Gps peak transfer speed – quite possibly faster than your phone can process. Coming from backward Australia, I can only dream of a day when internet will out-perform things like your computers HDD speeds or LAN infrastructure – with 5G in the pipeline, it seems like somewhat of a reality.

As with all new major advancements in technology from 4K cable streaming to 10km data “fricken lasers”, the cost of the research, installment and implementation is always something to consider. Taking a look at 4G speeds currently, they’re amazing and offer the user with speeds that are likely much faster than their current ADSL2+ offering, but are extremely expensive. An Australian eSports group called ACL PRO often experience issues with venue internet being poor in Australia – meaning that they have to run their StarCraft II tournaments via multiple 4G ‘wireless sticks’ – seeing hundreds of dollars worth of data transfer flushed down the drain per event. Wouldn’t it be amazing if one day, we could do away with home line ADSL style internet and simply power our whole houses infrastructure simply by walking inside with our mobile phone? Until then, enjoy thousands of dollars a month in downloads of shareware programs and creative commons music through your 4G connection – if you can even get one.

Back to the topic at hand, 5G is set to allow you to reach speeds of up to 10Gpbs, we’ve decided to list out the speeds below to give you an easily viewable comparison of past and future technology.

  • 2G: A few hundred k per second
  • 3G: Up to a few M per second
  • 4G: Two hundred M per second
  • 5G:  10Gbps

Chinese Ministry of Industry and Information Technology Chief Engineer Zhang Feng has announced that the global information and communications industry is ushering in a new wave of innovation, cloud computing, networking and other technologies alongside the rapid redevelopment of new applications. All said to be supported by an amazing 5G mobile internet infrastructure.

We will continue to report as the story develops.

Image courtesy of TNW

AMD FreeSync Display To Be Cheaper than G-Sync

AMD executive Richard Huddy recently talked at USA’s PDXLAN about some upcoming trends in the market – including a public release of Mantle SDK and Windows 7’s non-support of DX12. More importantly, Huddy took some time out to explain AMD’s FreeSync display, claiming that it will hit the market in December 2015, be better than NVIDIA’s G-Sync and cost less.

This information was recorded and released as a YouTube video just the other day, but has since unfortunately been taken down for unknown reasons (possibly due to AMD PR). Contained within this video was Huddy’s explanation of AMD’s FreeSync features among many other points of interest. Here’s hoping that AMD officially release this information for all in the coming days.

The FreeSync platform is said to be coming with a DP 1.2a display standard and is set to be listed “in the next 12 months” providing monitors at $100 cheaper than NVIDIA’s G-Sync offering. Unfortunately, Huddy didn’t really release much more direct information, seemingly taking this opportunity to PR-spin to a bunch of enthusiastic tech specialists at one of America’s favorite LAN parties.

However, he did mention the advantages that FreeSync will supposedly offer you on release. Alongside FreeSync living up to its name (literally), by providing this technology royalty-free to monitor manufacturers – FreeSync will require no additional hardware to function.

We will ensure to keep you updated on any advancements in FreeSync or any replies to Huddy’s comments about G-Sync as they come to light. Stay tuned to eTeknix for all the latest information.

Image courtesy of EXP review

Asus PCE-AC68 802.11ac Dual-Band PCI Express Wireless Adaptor Review

Introduction


Following on from my review on Asus’ top performing wireless AC router, the RT-AC68U that we looked at not too long ago, it is only worth us taking a closer look at what makes this next generation wireless adaptor tick. Unless your laptop or desktop system has built-in wireless, there is one of two main options out there for you to choose from in order to add the freedom to your system that is wireless networking. The first of these methods is to get a USB based device which is a simple device with very little setup required – literally plug it in, install the driver and you’re away. In addition a USB adaptor is compatible with both notebook and desktop systems and they are not overly expensive either. Like most things though there is a downside to going down the USB path; whilst they are able to deliver some highly respectable levels of performance, the antenna is either very small, or internal to the adaptor and therefore signal strength can be an issue.

The second main path to go down when going wireless is go with a PCI Express add-on card; obviously there is the immediate downside in that you’re not going to shoehorn one of these into your notebook system – so it’s USB only on that one I’m afraid, but for the desktop system there are a couple of perks in going down this route. The first of these is that you don’t lose another USB port on the rear or front of your case, but more importantly the antennae are bigger and on the PCE-AC68 there are three of them with a magnetic base plate on offer to maximise the signal strength and speed of your connection to the router. Sounds good huh?

Inside the box alongside the brightly coloured card Asus give us a VIP warranty note, driver CD and quick setup guide, three external antennae, a magnetic base plate with a long SMA extension cable and a half-height PCI back plate.

Asus RT-AC68U 802.11ac Dual-Band Wireless Router Review

Introduction


If I was to say the name Asus to a selection of people and ask what they would associate them with, I’d almost guarantee that none of them would say wireless or networking products in any way and this is quite understandable considering the fact that they are one of the biggest names out there on the market for motherboards and graphics card. Believe it or not though, networking has been something that Asus have been working on for a few years now and even though they have already got a wide selection of wireless and wired networking products out there, they are not as well-known about due to the bread and butter nature of their key product ranges.

As we are moving forward into an era where Gigabit wireless is becoming more of a common occurrence I’ve seen this as an ample opportunity to take a look at their latest and greatest wireless router, the RT-AC68U. Now considering this router is far more capable than the Netgear wireless access point and USB adaptor that I have, up to this point been using, I have therefore needed to employ a new wireless adaptor that is capable of equally delivering the same 1300Mbps connection speed that this router is capable of. Fortunately for me Asus also have a solution for this in the form of the PCE-AC68 PCI Express based wireless adaptor – I’ll have a separate review on this coming up shortly. With these wireless devices combined, we are looking at what is, at the moment, the pinnacle of wireless networking in the home and as we move forward and further into the capabilities of the 802.11ac standard – which I will add is currently nowhere near what its true potential is – we can get a better picture of what the next generation of consumer WiFi has to offer.

As we have seen though, pure performance is not the only thing that a router has to deliver these days, the feature set that each vendor has to be very rich, covering every possible eventuality that we may come across at a consumer and even a prosumer level. Now for the most part we find that a large number of these features will be somewhat similar to those found on other competing products. There is one small item that I will tease you with and one that will certainly catch the eye of any enthusiast; dual WAN capabilities. Before I get onto this little feature however there are a few other pieces to go through including what makes this router tick so to speak. Bring on what could be the most powerful router we have seen to date.

The accessory set for any router is pretty much set in stone and this setup is not that much different. Alongside the router, power cable and a single patch lead, there are a pair of interchangeable mains adaptors for the UK and EU markets, reference guide and manual on a CD with a paper Quick setup guide with a set of three external antennae rounding off the package.

Linksys EA6900 AC1900 802.11ac Dual- Band Wireless Router Review

Introduction


When it comes to home networking there are a number of big names that come to mind and fortunately I have been able to put a number of products from these names to the test, however there has been one particular brand that I have been keen to get in touch with and establish a line of communications – namely Linksys. Believe it or not it is not always as simple as firing an email at someone and instantly getting products sent back in return as some may believe. After a few months of patiently waiting and after having a meeting with a few representatives from Linksys at this years CES in Las Vegas, I can finally say that I’m glad to have Linksys onboard and I look forward to having a good sniff through the stack of products that they have to offer.

Link some of the other big names in the consumer networking market – Netgear and TP-Link being just a couple of the other big names, Linksys have a massive following and also have a big history to back a successful line of products. After being formed in 1998, Linksys was bought out by Cisco Systems in 2003 and in the next ten years that followed, their name became synonymous with the WRT line of networking products. To put it in a simple way, if you was into your home networking, then Linksys’ WRT54G was the way to go – the OpenWRT project which was founded to develop the hacked router caused the popularity to explode to a new level. On a personal Level I have owned a number of Linksys routers over the years, in particular the WRT54g, WRT54Gs and the ADSL2+MUE modem amongst others. The power and flexibility that was on offer set these products head and shoulders above all else. In the more recent years, Linksys went under a second acquisition as Belkin then purchased the company in the early stages of the last year, ready to take them to the next level. Today Linksys is branded under its own name with the enthusiast and power user at the heart of their design, whilst Belkin branded items target the home and entry-level user.

As we all know, wireless networking over the last couple of years has been going through a radical set of changes, at a similar rate as the core desktop components and sin the last five years we have seen wireless speeds rise from 54Mbps right up to the Gigabit WiFi speeds of over 1000Mbps that we are no seeing today. In simple terms we are looking at well over 20x times the wireless bandwidth that we saw only ten years ago. As technology has moved on and our homes have become more enriched and entangled in our digital lives, the amount of power and speed that we have been demanding from our home networks has risen to greater and greater levels, thus the reason why we have seen such a rapid growth in wireless technology.

The EA6900 router that I’m taking a look at today is one of the latest generation Gigabit wireless routers to come to market and with this it brings some of the fastest wireless speeds that we have seen to date. Like many other current wireless routers, we get a pair of dual band radios, offering both 2.4GHz and 5GHz wireless networking capacity with 802.11n speeds of up to 600Mbps on offer from the 2.4GHz band and the latest 802.11ac connectivity on the 5GHz band with a whopping speed of up to 1300Mbps on offer – yes that is faster than the current standard for LAN connections. Surrounding the super speed wireless connections the EA6900 also offers up four wired Gigabit Ethernet and Gigabit WAN port for super speed broadband connections, dual USB ports (1x USB2.0 & 1x USB3.0) for sharing storage and printers across the local network, topped off with a compelling user interface which offers up all the functionality that one would need from a high-end consumer router, but in an easy to use interface.

On paper things are looking good, but for me the real question is knowing if the Linksys that many of us knew in their hey-day has been kept close to heart or has this brand sadly become just another name on the shelf.

Inside the box, which itself gives us a good insight into what the router looks like and has to offer, we get a simple and to the point item list. Alongside the router and power cord we get three external antenna, a single CAT5e patch lead, a system resources CD and a quick setup guide to get things up and running. The packaging also points out that, like a few other routers that are now available, we have the option of downloading a mobile smart application for setting up and managing the router without the need for a desktop system.

Linksys WRT – A Legend Is Reborn As Shipments Begin

When it comes to iconic computer hardware, software and peripherals, there a numerous points on the technology time-line that stand out and when we focus more closely on consumer networking, there is without a doubt only one product that stands above everything else. This is of course the blue and black WRT54G the Linksys brought to the market way back in December 2002 – that’s just over 11 years ago. What started out as a single router eventually turned out to be a one of the greatest success stories in Linksys’ history. Due to their [at the time] high levels of performance, flexibility, ease of use and much more, this line of routers has seen deployment not only in the home but all across the world in numerous different situations – be it in an office or directly out in the field. When DD-WRT came to light in later years, customisation and modification of these routers went berserk as users found multiple ways to get that bit extra from their kit – I should know as I was one of those users.

This router has made such an impression on the market and it has shown its worth so much that even today we find that some of them still in use today.

As time as moved on though and wireless technology has evolved to a point where it is now faster than Gigabit LAN, Linksys now as a part of Belkin have been working to rekindle the essence of the WRT product line and gives the world once more the ultimate wireless router that will put virtually every other product out there on the market to shame. The WRT1900AC has been born.

Earlier in the year at CES we caught a glimpse of what the new router had to offer and what is clear above all else is that Linksys want people to know that this router owes all its heritage and design to the former market leader. First things first though, just take a look at it, I mean it’s not everyday that I say that I love the look of a product so much, but when it comes to rekindling the good ol’ times, Linksys have hit the proverbial nail right on the head with this one. Not only do we get the classic blue and black plastic housing, we get a more modern twist on the design with broad angles and the image that this unit means business.

So what’s new with the WRT1900AC? Well before we even get on to the hardware side of things I have to mention the firmware. What made the WRT54G what it is today was the open source aspect of its firmware and OpenWRT was a project that was based around hacking into the original WRT lineup to introduce more power and more features into the already powerful hardware. Linksys are fully aware of this appeal and as a result they have been working very closely with OpenWRT to ensure that the 1900AC is capable of giving users the option to chose between the default firmware or to use the open source alternative.

Knowing that the WRT-Cult are going to want more from a new router, Linksys have beefed up the specification of the 1900AC to include a dual-core 1,2GHz CPU, 128MB flash memory, 256MB of DDR3 RAM,  USB and eSATA ports, four Gigabit LAN and a single Gigabit WAN port, four external & replaceable antennae and on top of all that, dual-band wireless offering speeds of up to 1300Mbps 802.11ac on the 5GHz band and 600Mbps 802.11n on the 2.4GHz band. All in all we are looking at some of the best specifications on the market today.

On the software side of the router, the features keep on coming in. Out of the box the WRT1900AC ships with Linksys’ latest Smart WiFi setup and management tools, with a more intuitive and flexible user interface as well as the option to remotely manage the system from anywhere in the world through either a web interface or the optional mobile application. Other features both new and old include the ability to share connected storage devices and printers to the local network through the USB3.0 or 2.0 port or even eSATA ports, share content via FTP to external connections, Dynamic DNS setup options such as No-IP, DynDNS and TZO, various operating modes such as router / gateway / range extender or bridge, parental controls, guest networks and parental controls.

Further more there is the obvious ability as mentioned to upgrade to OpenWRT firmware where there are a host of additional features on hand, giving the WRT-Cult all the power that they want and will need for many years to come.

Whilst shipments have just started, sales of the WRT1900AC wil not commence until the 13th April with Best Buy stocking units with an MSRP of $279.99. Alternatively you can purchase the new router from Linksys directly through their online store. Now whilst the price may seem expensive; and compared to other routers it is a lot more to pay, if you’re a WRT fan and follower such as myself then this is just a small price to pay for what is likely to be the best bit of networking kit that we are likely to see all year.

Finally all I have to say is watch this space for a review where I aim to put the new WRT1900AC router to the test to see how the spirit of WRT has been reborn.

Source: Press Release

Netgear A6200 Dual-Band USB Wireless AC Adaptor Review

Introduction


Just over a week ago I took a look at one of Netgear’s latest Smart WiFi routers to roll off the production line and into the real-world. The R6250, like many of Netgear’s latest routers, offers up the latest in WiFi technology with Gigabit wireless connections and also beamforming+ technology to ensure the connected devices get the fastest and best signal as possible. When we look at the latest wireless standard – 802.11ac – at this moment in time, there isn’t actually that many devices on the market that can connect using the AC standard. Whilst a number of devices can ‘see’ the AC networks (which run at 5GHz), in most instances they will actually be connecting through the 802.11n standard as that is the fastest they can go.

For the most part, running at wireless-n speeds is going to be fast enough for the average household and considering the fact that pretty much everything runs to this standard these days, many people don’t feel that there is a need to go that bit further. For those the do want to take things up a notch and push towards the world of Gigabit wireless, the AC standard is where the speed is. As we’ve seen recently, the routers the support AC are readily available in the market place and now we are starting to see the add-in wireless adaptors crop up too. As a result I have taken the opportunity to start testing routers that we have in for review at the new AC standard, and the A6200 wireless adaptor from Netgear is what I will be using.

When we get on to the testing stage of this review, some will note that the performance results look very similar to those found within the R6250 review and you would be right – they are. The simple reason for this is because of the router that I opted to use for the testing of this adaptor, on both the 5GHz band, but also on the 2.4GHz band. In the same way that I used this adaptor to test the R6250 router, I was also recording down the performance for the A6200 at the same time as this was the only router that I had to hand that would be able to deliver the bandwidth required.

Inside the box and alongside the wireless adaptor, Netgear include a few bits of paperwork including a quick setup guide, along with a CD with the drivers and Netgear Genie software and a USB dock come extension lead.

The A6200 is one of Netgear’s premium wireless adaptors offering up both the fastest possible speed and features.

Google Want To Use Your Face And Name For Adverts, Here’s How To Stop Them

Recent plans were set in motion by Google that would see them able to use your name and face for advertisements, a sort of endorsement from online reviews and all in all, it is pretty harmless. Naturally not everyone will be happy with sharing this information and since Google are such good sports about it all, it is in fact very simple to opt out of this one.

Three super easy steps for you to follow:

It really is that simple, of course you may already find that the checkbox is already clear, in which case you don’t have to change a thing! Many users are reporting that they’ve not had to change it, while some have.

Quick and simple, unless Google decide to make it more complicated in the near future of course.

Thank you TechCrunch for providing us with this information.