Researchers Prove That Drones Can Be Disabled Using the Right Sound Frequency

Researchers at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) in Daejon, South Korea, seem to have found an easy way to take out drones from the sky using ‘the right sound’. They explained that some components inside drones are vulnerable to certain frequencies, so with the right one, you can disable them.

One of the researchers stated that components such as gyroscopes have been made to resonate with sound above the audible spectrum, but some of them are still in the audible spectrum, which makes them vulnerable to interference. In an experiment, they used a speaker attached to a drone and connected to a laptop via Wi-Fi. When the right sound was played through the speaker, the drone dived down and crashed.

Of course, you won’t be able to physically attach a speaker to a drone in most cases if you want to make it crash, but this proves that sounds can be used to crash drones. Other experiments involved attaching a speaker to a police shield and making a sonic wall, but without the proper high-tech equipment to keep aim on the drone while it spirals out of control, it is useless.

The conclusion is that drone enthusiasts shouldn’t worry about it, unless your neighbour silently attached a speaker to your drone. Using high-tech sound disruptors, as far as I know, is illegal in most countries, so if you’re not piloting a high-tech military drone, you should be fine.

Thank you PCWorld for providing us with this information

YouTube Added Support for 4K Videos Running at 60 FPS

If you though your PC was great at playing 4K videos from YouTube and Netflix, you should put it to the test again, but this time at a higher frequency. YouTube has announced that it will be adding support for 4K videos at 60 frames per second for some time, but there are still only a few videos out there that come with the higher frequency. Still, it does look nice. So the question is, can your PC handle it? Even more important, can your internet bandwidth cope with it?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=23&v=fEAyDNWaCto

Thank you KitGuru for providing us with this information

Official Titan X Specifications Leaked, Launch Set in 24 Hours

VideoCards has just leaked the official specifications of NVIDIA’s GTX Titan X, having them match everything that has been leaked before.

As we all know, the Titan X houses the GM200 core, which is the successor of the GM204. One of the problems found in the GM204 was the lack of FP64 performance and if the GM200 is able to address that, we are looking at a worthy successor to the GK110-based original Titan chip.

There are two inconsistencies however, one linked to the other. The memory clock was thought to be 2000 MHz (8000 in total), however the table shows the memory is 1753 MHz. This in turn affects the memory bandwidth due to the fact that a 2000 MHz memory clock would have given the card a 384 GB/s output, but instead only 336 GB/s are outputted if the memory frequency turns out to be the one displayed in the table.

Thank you WCCF and VideoCards for providing us with this information

ASUS to Release Gigabit Wireless Router

The ASUS RT-AC55U will provide users with not only 1200Mbps dual AC wireless capabilities, but Gigabit LAN will also come standard all for the low price of under $200 US. This information comes about not long after ASUS have released their previous Gigabit-enabled units, with the main difference being the some small now-standard features and capabilities.

The AC55U offers 802.11ac wireless transmission, set at 2.4GHz frequency providing speeds of up to 300Mbps, however it gives the ability to provide 5.0GH bandwidth of 867Mbps. This new release is said, by sources, to contain a Qualcomm chip offering, without any known specific model published. They also claim that the AC55U uses radio-gain antennas, providing two more to the user than the previous models issued to the public.

As far as wiring and features go, the AC55U will provide similar specifications previous models, as we have stated. The most important release features will include; four Gigabit LAN ports, NAS support, smart set-top box compatibility, smart TV integration, USB 3.0, FTP capabilities, 3G/4G sharing, UNPnP AV server support, DLNA server support and offline download capabilities as standard issue.

The management software is said to remain as ASUSWRT, supporting QoS bandwith allocation, traffic monitoring, various AP modes and up to four multi-SSID functions. Officials haven’t yet confirmed the price and date of release, however reports and rumors claim that it will come into the market between $180-$220 US.

If you’re looking for a decently priced router that offers all the bells and whistles, it seems like ASUS are going to be providing the goods.

Informationand image courtesy of Chiphell