Each Final Fantasy VII Remake Episode Will be as Long as Final Fantasy XIII

Reception was mixed when Square Enix announced that its remake of Final Fantasy VII was to be split into episodes, with some fans accusing the developer of milking the game’s release. However, Final Fantasy VII Remake producer Yoshinori Kitase has revealed that each episode will be the length of a single game, comparing the length of each instalment to Final Fantasy XIII.

“It will essentially be a full-scale game for each part of the multi-part series. In XIII, each installment told the story from a different angle,” Kitase told Game Informer’s Joe Juba (via TechRadar). “It was kind of like approaching an unknown territory in a sense.”

“Whereas with Final Fantasy VII Remake, we already have a pre-existing story, so it wouldn’t really make sense if that isn’t encompassed in a multi-part series […] So, if we’re just looking at each of these parts, one part should be on par with the scale of one Final Fantasy XIII game,” Kitase added.

Kitase is a Final Fantasy veteran, having been involved in the franchise since the very first release, plus RPG classic Chrono Trigger.

“I, along with [Tetsuya] Nomura-san and [Kazushige] Nojima-san – who are involved with the remake – were also involved with the original Final Fantasy,” Kitase said. “We were the people who created it, so in that sense, we don’t think anything is untouchable. That isn’t to say we’re changing everything!”

While the release date for the first episode of Final Fantasy VII Remake has not been revealed, it’s a safe bet that more details will be revealed at this Summer’s E3.

Final Fantasy XV Director Admits Series was in a “Tough Spot”

Hajime Tabata, the director of the forthcoming Final Fantasy XV, has admitted that the series has failed to deliver a truly successful game during the HD era – a “tough spot,” as he puts it – and that the latest entry in the franchise has been forced to take a more “modern” approach in order to be a “challenger again”.

“After a fresh start as Final Fantasy XV, the part that we felt was most necessary was “to modernize Final Fantasy”,” Tabata told Siliconera. “Basically, to make a Final Fantasy that works in today’s era. In order to do this, we thought that “Final Fantasy will become the challenger again” and we decided to do everything we can to make this possible.”

Tabata blamed the trappings of HD game development for the oft-criticised linear nature of Final Fantasy XIII, Square Enix’s previous single-player RPG entry (since Final Fantasy XIV is an MMORPG), saying, “I understand that Final Fantasy XIII also had some rough criticism, but that is not what was aimed for, and I’m sure the objective for it was much higher than that. In the end, it became a title known for being linear.”

“That was not something that was aimed for,” he said, “but considering the way things were being done, they were not able to break the walls of HD production, and I believe that the truth of the matter is that they simply weren’t able to make a proper landing.”

He also acknowledged that the burden of the Final Fantasy name weighed heavily on the shoulders of FFXIII’s development team, adding, “If anything, how to break through such a reality was what made it heavy, in that sense. The heaviness of “the Final Fantasy IP is in a tough spot” was at its peak there.”

Final Fantasy XV is due out for Xbox One and PlayStation 4 later this year.