New Study Shows Americans Are Using Their Mobile Internet More

Everything is changing, from the device in your pocket to your way we communicate with the whole world, we see something new come out every week. With Samsung hosting meetings for 5G connections, it’s only a matter of time before your phone is as good as any home line when it comes to the internet speed you get. A recent study shows that this may already be the case in America where the use of mobile internet may be replacing home lines.

The recent study by the US Census Bureau revealed that there are now a number of American households which have ditched the internet coming in on the home line in favour for the internet their mobile phones give them. The exact numbers show that the 82 percent of households used DSL, cable or fiber connections back in 2013, a number which now sits at just 75% while mobile internet usage has doubled from 10% to 20% in the same period.

What doe that mean? According to these figures, it means that one in five houses now relies on mobile internet. These figures may change how companies look at new projects and programs with the like of Facebook pushing for faster wireless internet speeds.

Verizon Looking to Switch Everyone From Copper to Fiber

Internet speeds are going up and up, but the US still lags behind the rest of the world leaving many upset. Some companies charge for the bigger internet, but internet provider Verizon looks to be one of the first to encourage users to switch to fiber optic cables.

Fiber is the only fix” was revealed by a document that seems to suggest that those who request fixes to any copper line will be told that the only way to fix the problem is by taking up the fiber optic lines. This will fall in line with the companies new official stance is to refuse repairs on any copper lines with the document stating that their official response when asked to fix a copper line “do not fix trouble with copper lines”.

If you don’t have a problem with copper lines, but someone near you has, then Verizon is making steps to improve and upgrade other people’s lines, perhaps in a move to help defer and delay future problems.

Some have felt like Verizon has been rather hostile in their actions to upgrade users from copper to fiber cables, with this being but the latest in a slew of moves to force users to upgrade to the latest technology. While people are happy for faster internet and connections, being forced to do anything is often seen with reluctance and anger.

UK May Have Hit Broadband Targets

When it comes to the internet the coalition government made a pledge that by 2015, they would have the “best superfast broadband in Europe”. The UK may have hit broadband targets, but still fears remain over the future and if the targets are good enough.

The problem with setting targets with technology, they look great but they have to change as technology does. The original target for 90% of properties having superfast broadband by 2015 was changed in light of the difficulty and processes involved, eventually changing to 95% of properties by 2017. We may have hit the 90% marker now, but that last 5% needed to meet the goal posts next year may come at difficulty.

The difficulty comes from the properties located in rural areas, with fibre optic speeds slowly reaching those areas (although not as the speeds users want to gain access to the internet). The second problem though is the big one, what is super fast internet these days?

Back in 2010, the definition was 24 Mbps, but these days you can grab 100 or even 200 Mbps internet. With the kind of fibre optic cables needed to reach 24 Mbps used in its current roll out the question is being raised that if we compare ourselves on “superfast broadband” in a few years time, will we need to roll out new options all over again.

The standard option  for many European countries is now FTTH (Fiber to the house), an option that is only reaching 1.56% of British homes. The city of Hull has one of the lowest superfast broadband availability, listed at 37.6% because Hull’s independent telecoms provider, KCOM, has already opted to deploy the FTTH strategy, resulting in 37.6% of houses now getting fibre optic speed straight to the house.

Google Fiber Has Dropped Its Free Tier In Kansas City

Google Fiber is Googles way of providing the internet for a variety of users, with a wide range of choices to help people in all situations. Their $70 gigabit internet access was their most commonly known option, but for those in Kansas City you could also get 5Mbps internet for a small construction fee, or at least you could as it would appear that Google Fiber has now dropped its free tier. The free 5Mbps option is now longer available for selection

The free 5 Mbps option is no longer available for selection, with a new 100 Mbps costing $50 a month and the $100 installation fee waived in exchange for a one-year commitment. Those who are currently on the tier have until the 19th May to say they want to keep it, but with the option also being available in Austin and Provo, the question is will they soon lose the low-cost option.

With the removal being unannounced and no word from Google yet regarding the removal, it is up to anyone’s guess why they have made this move. It could simply be that the days of fiber being considered a luxury experiment are over and with so many people now offering fiber connections for cheap prices, Google fiber may just need to start making money.

Linksys Introduces New Modem Router and More DD-WRT Support

Linksys is one of the biggest manufacturers of routers and network equipment in general, but that doesn’t mean that there isn’t room for a more devices as well as room for improvement on the current lineup. Linksys’ new modem router is the X6200 and it is a combined cable and ADSL/VDSL dual-band WiFi model.

The Linksys X6200 supports pretty much any connection you can have from static RJ45-based over cable to DSL connections and I wouldn’t be one bit surprised if you could use the included USB 2.0 port to attach a 3G/4G/LTE modem too. While it can connect to pretty much any type of internet connection, the built-in cable modem might be the selling point for this router. The internet connection speed has gone up and up, but a lot of cable modems lack the capability to handle the fast speeds your provider is selling you, which in return means that you’ll get a worse experience than you should.

“There is a lack of knowledge when it comes to cable modems. Consumers have cable modems or gateways that don’t match the cable broadband subscriptions they are paying for – thus getting slower speeds and frustrating experiences,” said Justin Doucette, director of product management, Linksys.

The Linksys X6200 isn’t the fastest wireless router, but the speeds of 300Mbps on the 2.4GHz band and 433Mbps on the 5GHz band should be sufficient for any internet usage. The modem router also features four RJ45 LAN ports for that direct Gigabit Ethernet connection that will provide you with the best connection. As previously mentioned, the X6200 also features a USB 2.0 port that can turn your USB drive into a network attached storage device.

The new Linksys X6200 modem router will be available in March 2016 for an MSRP of £79.99 and also has more advanced features such as parental control and guest access.

Feature highlights

  • One VDSL/ADSL2/2+ port, Annex A – RJ-11 port
  • One Gigabit WAN port with auto MDI/MDIX sensing (RJ-45) for Router functionality
  • Four Gigabit Ethernet ports
  • One USB 2.0 port
  • Supports VPN pass-through with IPSec, PPTP, and L2TP
  • Supports logging for incoming and outgoing traffic
  • DHCP server for LAN
  • Supports Universal Plug and Play (UPnP)
  • IPv4/IPv6 dual-stack support
  • DSL Modem supports ITU G992.5 ADSL2+ Annex A, L, and M and VDSL G.993.1 and ITU G.993.2 standards

At the same time as Linksys introduced us to this new modem router, they also announced an expansion of DD-WRT support among their existing routers. The support now includes the WRT1900AC, WRT1200AC, and recently released WRT1900ACS Dual-band Gigabit Wi-Fi routers.

 

US City-Run ISP Boasts 10GBps Internet

An ISP run by the city of Salisbury in North Carolina, USA has announced that it is bringing speeds of up to 10GBps to local residents and businesses. The municipal service, Fibrant, was created five years ago after the city was unable to persuade private ISPs to upgrade its fibre network. Gigabit speeds have been available to Salisbury’s citizens and businesses since last year for $105 a month, while its 50MBps symmetrical service costs only $45 a month.

Though Fibrant is targeting its 10GBps package at businesses, it is “available in every premises in the city,” including residential houses, though it does not expect much interest from home internet users. The most prohibitive aspect of using 10GBps at home is the cost, with Fibrant expect to charge $400 a month for the service.

“We don’t want to oversell customers and have you paying for a 10Gbps service when you’re using 100Mbps,” Robert Van Geons, head of the county’s economic development commission, said.

“To be honest with you, we’re not anticipating residents taking 10Gbps service,” Kent Winrich, Fibrant Director of Broadband and Infrastructure, added. “The reason for 10 gig is economic development… This is really geared toward attracting businesses that need this type of bandwidth and have it anywhere they want in the city.”

Even if residents don’t use the 10GBps service, the network upgrades that Fibrant has implemented will benefit all of its users, insists Winrich. “You go to many cities at 9 o’clock at night and you see your bandwidth drop,” he said. “We’ve got so much headroom now that at 9 o’clock when everyone’s hitting Netflix, it’ll come right through and we won’t have any choke points.”

Thank you Ars Technica for providing us with this information.

TP-Link Announces VR900 AC1900 WiFi VDSL2 Modem Router

TP-Link were recently in the news as the company behind Google’s fancy new OnHub router, but they’re also working on their own products. The latest which just has been released is the AC1900 Wireless Dual Band Gigabit VDSL2 Modem Router, the Archer VR900. The Archer VR900 offers a versatility of connection options, making it suitable no matter which type internet connection you have. At the same time, the VR900 offers great speeds with its AC1900 wireless signal as well as great coverage thanks to beam-forming technologies and three external antennas.

For maximum flexibility, the DSL and WAN input on the TP-Link VR900 support VDSL, ADSL, fiber, and cable connections. You can even use it for with your 3G and 4G dongles when connected to the built-in USB 3.0 and USB 2.0 ports.

The Archer VR900 utilizes the latest 802.11ac wireless standard to deliver data at speeds of up to 1900Mbps. Simultaneous dual-band Wi-Fi provides excellent stability and eliminates wireless interference by transmitting and receiving on both 2.4GHz band and 5Ghz bands. You’ll get up to 600Mbps via the 2.4Gbps band and up to 1300Gbps via the 5GHz band. The modem router also has four Gigabit Ethernet ports for the best possible and wired connection.

The Archer VR900 is built around a 1GHz processor that should deliver enough power even for data-intensive tasks. No need to worry about speed caps because you’re using a lot of connections at once. Connect all of your network-dependent devices and let the VR900 balance the load to avoid bottlenecks at the processor level.

Nelson Qiao, assistant general manager at TP-LINK UK Ltd, says, “As the foundation of your home network, choosing the right router is an important decision, complicated by the various connection types. The VR900 takes the guesswork out of getting the right type of router so customers get the latest wireless features for high performance networks now and in the future, even if they change ISP.”

TP-Link VR900 Key Features and Specifications

  • AC1900 Simultaneous Dual-Band Wi-Fi (2.4 GHz 600Mbps + 5 GHz 1300Mbps)
  • Beamforming Technology
  • 3 High-Performance Antennas
  • 1GHz Internal Processor
  • 1 USB 3.0 Port and 1 USB 2.0 Port
  • 4 Gigabit LAN Ports
  • Web Interface for Easy Setup

FCC Wants Copper Networks Turned Off in Favour of Fibre Upgrade

The US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is introducing new rules designed to encourage internet service providers (ISPs) to shut down the internet copper network in favour of superfast fibre. Previous legislation required ISPs to seek approval from the FCC before switching off a copper network, but new a new ruling leaves that at the discretion of the ISP, provided that customers see no drop in service.

ISPs still need to notify the FCC if their switch from copper to fibre will affect users, “However, carriers will retain the flexibility to retire their copper networks in favor of fiber without prior Commission approval—as long as no service is discontinued, reduced, or impaired,” the FCC said in its official statement.

“Changing technology does not change responsibility,” Tom Wheeler, Chairman of the FCC, said. “Fiber brings great cost savings, great efficiencies, and great opportunities for new services. But it does not bring the opportunity to walk away from the responsibilities that govern the relationship between those who build and those who use the facilities.”

Though the move is great news for internet users, it could have potential downsides for landline telephone users. A copper network does not require power from the grid to facilitate phonecalls, while a fibre network does. In the event of a power cut, a copper network keeps the phones working, while a fibre network would shut down all phonecalls. A separate FCC ruling will require telecoms providers to provide an 8-hour power backup in the event of a power outage. While that may suffice during a temporary outage, a storm, flood, or hurricane could put phonelines out of action for days.

Thank you Ars Technica for providing us with this information.

101 US Cities to Build Their Own Gigabit Networks

Like many counties that became used to using old copper networks to bring the internet to homes, the US is starting to fall behind in terms of price and speed, with its larger telecoms companies reluctant to invest in expensive fibre networks. With that in mind, 101 US cities have come together to agree to a vastly ambitious project to bring gigabit-speed internet to America, and they’ll build it themselves if they need to.

The cities are part of the Next Century Cities coalition, which aims to help cities to manage the massive undertaking of constructing an extensive fibre network. Deb Socia, executive director for Next Century Cities, said, “Since launching Next Century Cities in October, we’ve seen incredible demand from cities looking to lead the conversation about the crucial role next-generation Internet plays in helping communities thrive.”

The Next Century Cities coalition doesn’t just help create the infrastructure, it also negotiates with federal and state authorities to work within each region’s laws and regulations. Almost as an extension of net neutrality, the group wants to take the internet out of the hands of big business and deliver it to the people, maintaining the highest quality and speed without having to sacrifice services.

Next Century Cities has not set a timeframe by which it hopes to establish gigabit-speed internet networks in its 100 cities, but it currently working hard to make it a reality.

Thank you Vice for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of NextPowerUp.

Huawei Achieves 1 Terabits Per Second Speeds

Chinese networking giant Huawei, in partnership with telecoms company Proximus, have achieved unbelievable speeds of up to one terabits per second over super-channel optical cable, the equivalent of sending 33 HD movies in just a second. The successful trial was announced on Huawei’s website on Thursday.

The record-breaking transmission, held in Nice, France, involved sending data over 1,040km fibre connection, implementing a ‘Flexigrid’ infrastructure and Huawei’s own OSN (Optical Switch Node) 9800 platform and 1Tbps OTN (Optical Transport Network) line card, increasing the capacity of the fibre optic cable by compressing the spaces between the transmission channels. The increased density within the cable marks a 150% rise in efficiency over typical 100GBps network connections.

“The network is turning to DC (Data Center) centric, which brings a boost demand for increased bandwidth,” said Jeffrey Gao, President of the Huawei transmission network product line. “Businesses are currently undergoing a digital transformation and consumers require always-on connectivity. Huawei supports its customers through innovation; together we build simplified networks ensuring the best user experience towards end users. This trial is testimony of Huawei’s engagement to innovation.”

“At Proximus we pledge to satisfy the evolving customers demand by investing in new technologies to offer them the best quality and service,” Geert Standaert, Chief Technology Officer at Proximus, added. “Together with Huawei we want to let our network infrastructure evolve to support current and future bandwidth demands and offer our customers an outstanding user experience.”

Image courtesy of ZDNet.

Four More US Cities to Get Google Fiber Gigabit Internet

As a further sign of Google’s quest to take over the world, The Wall Street Journal says that the company’s Google Fiber service is set to expand to four more US cities.

The Journal says that those cities are Atlanta, Nashville, Raleigh-Durham, and Charlotte, adding to the cities of Austin, Texas, Provo, Utah, and Kansas City in Missouri. The newspaper says that Google has yet to confirm any such plans, but that the company has dispatched press event invites to local publications in each of the new cities.

The lack of readily available information means that there is currently little information regarding pricing for residents of the new cities, but that it should be around the same price as for the cities Google Fiber is already established in – $80 per month. That only matters of course, when the new system is set up, something that could take at least a year and only in the neighbourhoods where there is sufficient interest.

Source: The Wall Street Journal Via: The Verge

USA Intends to Provide Internet to Villages via Laser

According to US technology news website, TechnologyReview, several US communications carriers are going to pilot a technology which will see a laser beam internet up to speeds of 2 Gbps through the air – meaning underground cables don’t need to be laid. This advanced laser and millimeter wave technology is said to be a replacement for conventional fiber, utilized in situations where the population is sparsely populated – including remote US towns and African Villages.

Why not mobile technology? The reports claim that although mobile technology is generally a good alternative, cables will still need to be run to telephone towers tracing to the ‘internet backbone’  – providing a huge cost for manufacturers. This new laser and millimeter technology will allow these US communications carriers to beam a data transmission at a distance of up to 10 kilometers without the need to dig trenches or erect towers. The first countries to be testing this technology are the United States, Mexico, Nigeria and some parts of Africa.

AOptix is the original inventor of this capability, claiming that they believe laser communications will provide an ideal alternative to optical fiber – once again due to the costing nature of laying cables. Data shows that in New York City, the cost of laying just one kilometer of fiber optic cable can cost up to $800,000.

This isn’t a simple point a to point b device either. AOptix claims that you can set up multiple devices to be set as a relay, allowing for 10km worth of transmission to take place per unit. There are a few possible issues with this technology that they haven’t covered in their releases however. How much do these units cost and do they need line-of-sight?

The announcement of this new technology also could have military use, but we’re very interested to know if it needs direct line-of-sight to function.

Image courtesy of Chiphell

Google Fibre Is Not Coming To The UK Anytime Soon

A couple of days ago we heard of a report that Google was looking at a project to bring Google Fibre to the UK, however it appears many people read into the report in the wrong way. Although Google do admit that they have looked at the possibility of having their ultra-fast fibre service here in the UK, a look at the possibility is all it is.

Since the news has flown around the Google is coming here and everyone has got their hopes up, a spokesperson for Google spoke to Engadget saying that people should not read too much into it. His statement goes on to say that they speak to telecoms companies all of the time but they have not had any serious planning discussions for Google Fibre in the UK.

We have informal conversations with other telecom companies all the time, but we’ve never had any serious planning discussions about bringing Google Fiber to Britain.”

Getting their service up and running in the US has not come without its challenges, aside from the fact that the current internet infrastructure has to be worked on so that it can deliver the blazing-fast 1Gbps speeds that Google boast, Google are in a highly competitive market and it does not take that much to get in the way of other providers and push them out-of-the-way. Not surprisingly this is likely to upset a few people along the way. Fortunately UK ISPs such as BT and Virgin Media, who both offer some of the UK’s fastest fibre internet packages,Google are not going to be here for a while yet. I wouldn’t be surprised if they start coming up with a game plan in the not too distant future to tackle Google Fibre if they do decide to make the move.

Source: Engadget

5Gbps Benchmark as Ericsson Tests Wireless 5G

Excited by the speed boost your getting from 4G? Well you ain’t seen nothing yet, because 5G is so fast, it can even blow Google Fibre a death blow thanks to its breakneck speeds. Ericsson announced on Tuesday that they’ve tested their 5G network in a hardware trial, reaching a staggering 5 gigabits per second over-the-air with its wireless 5G technology!

5Gbps is a an impressive benchmark and is no doubt conducted under ideal conditions, yet lets think about that number for a moment. 5Gbps is around 250 times faster than LTE, It is FIVE TIMES faster than Google Fiber’s impressive 1Gbps wired connection. It could download a 50GB movie in around 11 seconds, that’s an entire Blu-Ray worth of content streamed in less time it takes you to get a Blu-Ray out of its box and put it in the player.

The downside? The rollout isn’t set to be finished for ages, with launch expected in the 2020. The only good thing is that 2020 is a lifetime in terms of technology, leaving lots of time for smartphones, cars and other connected devices to make the right advances in technology to fully reap the benefits of 5G technology.

Thank you CNET for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of Ericsson.

NASA’s ‘ShadowNet’ Revealed To Be 10x Faster than Google Fiber

Google promised to bring internet speeds 1,000 faster than the current average internet speed found in homes around the US through Google Fiber. The connection, which is around 10 Gigabits per second, might be something seen only in sci-fi movies. However, NASA tends to disagree.

The space agency allegedly uses a shadow internet called ESnet, which is short for Energy Science Network, capable of delivering cross-country speeds of 91 Gigabits per second, deemed the fastest connection ever reported.

However, these speeds will not reach normal home connections anytime soon. NASA is using this shadow network to explore the next wave of computing applications. The U.S. Department of Energy is apparently running ESnet, having it be an important tool for researchers who require large amounts of data handled for projects such as the Large Hadron Collider and Human Genome Project.

The use of such technology leads back to how the Internet was born and eventually became the most important piece of technology used by everyone today. This is why ESnet and Internet2, a non-profit international network built-in 1995 for researchers after the Internet was commercialised, might hold the key of faster internet speeds in the future.

Also, equipment capable of handling high-speed internet, similar to what ESnet currently provides, has been out on the market since 2010. However, the Internet is not a straight line. Each piece of data needs to pass through various nodes before reaching its destination, similar to what a driver has to do when reaching an intersection. As a driver, you are required to slow down and even stop in order to check if you are clear to proceed on your way through the intersection. The same principle applies to data packets through a node.

ESnet is proof that internet speeds which most people only dream of can be achieved. With a lot of effort and probably some luck, similar internet speeds could be available on the commercial market in the future.

Thank you Wired for providing this information
Image courtesy of Wired

USB 3.Optical Cables By Corning Now Available

Corning, the same people who make the popular Gorilla Glass front to many of today’s mobile handsets, have today announced the availability of their latest USB 3.Optical cables which allow USB devices to be connected at far greater distances than with a traditional copper based alternative.

Using the latest fibre optic technology the 3.Optical cable connects just as normal via a standard USB2.0 or 3.0 port, but instead of having copper wire running between the two terminals, an optical cable is used instead and this means that the standard limitation of 3 metres from point-to-point is nor longer a worry nor a restriction with distances of up to 30m easily achievable.

Since their introduction in the early stages of last year, Corning have been developing the cables with thinner and lighter designs being introduced and thanks to the of their ClearCurve VSDN fibre, they are able to withstands a “zero-bend” radius which allows the to withstand a lot of punishment such as being squeezed and tangled with out damage or loss of connectivity.

“With longer, thinner, and lighter cables, USB 3.Optical Cables by Corning give users the freedom to max out data connection speeds for a more enjoyable creative workflow,” said Bernhard Deutsch, vice president, product line management, Optical Connectivity Solutions for Corning Optical Communications. “Imagine having your computer at your workstation and the whir of back-up hard drives, printers, and other noisy peripherals in an entirely different room – and still benefiting from unbelievable transmission speeds.”

With many of todays external devices utilising the humble USB connection, the USB 3.Optical cables are ideal for a whole multitude of operations and scenarios, whether it be in the home, or in a commercial setting such as an office or bar.

“For example, restaurants can connect order-entry stations to USB-equipped printers located in both the bar and kitchen areas. The system then splits out the orders, printing food tickets in the kitchen and drink orders at the bar, resulting in faster service and happier customers.”

Currently the cables are only available in 10m lengths with “A-to-receptacle-A” terminals on either end (in other words they are just like a USB extension cable, but this means that they will work with any form of USB terminal when a short connecting cable is used. Priced at around $129, stock is available through the US Amazon store and Accu-Tech with more suppliers appearing in the future, along with 15 and 30m lengths also appearing on the shelves later this year.

Source: Press Release

Job Posting Suggests New York City Is Next For Google Fiber

Google have posted up a job this week that suggests Google Fiber will be heading to New York City. The job listing is for a Google Fiber Regional Sales Manager for New York, a job that “will manage multiple teams that evangelize Google Fiber services to MDU (multi-dwelling apartments and condos) and large SMB owners.” It doesn’t take a big stretch of the imagination to the pieces together from that alone.

With huge success already behind Google and their Fiber, there are many consumers and cities that would love for their services to be part of their infrastructure. It offers huge gains in connection speeds, great opportunities for small and large businesses and it’s even competitively priced again the competition, many of whom cannot compete in terms of network performance in most areas.

Time Warner is no doubt shaking in their boots, and Verizon have been slow to rollout their own networks. Google on the other hand doesn’t seem to scared of rapid expansion and heavy investment to get the job done, something that will help the company with the difficult task of rolling out new Fiber in somewhere as vast as NYC.

The rollout is slow, there aren’t many places in the US that get Google just yet, but the pace is picking up and who knows, in ten years time, maybe we’ll all be able to enjoy the network speeds they offer.

Thank you BGR for providing us with this information.

Google Planning on Bringing ‘Fiber’ To 34 Cities In The U.S. By The End Of 2014

It appears that Google is interested in providing its fiber services to even more cities in the US. The company giant has reportedly invited nine metro areas to analyse the requirements of bringing Google Fiber into their ‘neighbourhoods’.

“People are hungrier than ever for faster Internet, and as a result, cities across America are making speed a priority,” Google says. “We’ve long believed that the Internet’s next chapter will be built on gigabit speeds, so it’s fantastic to see this momentum.”

Google has stated that up to 34 cities around the US could be potential candidates for its fiber services. The metro areas stated are Charlotte, North Carolina; Nashville, Tennessee; Portland, Oregon; San Antonio, Texas; Atlanta, Georgia; Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina; Phoenix, Arizona; Salt Lake City, Utah and San Jose, California. It is said that Google will come up with a list of Fiber cities by the end of this year

“Between now and then, we’ll work closely with each city’s leaders on a joint planning process that will not only map out a Google Fiber network in detail, but also assess what unique local challenges we might face,” Google says.

Potential cities will also join Google’s initiative by providing feedback on their requirements on implementing the Fiber in their home town, along with a map of other service lines, such as gas, electricity, water, etc, that need to be avoided when working on the infrastructure.

This move could also be seen as a treat to competitors such as Comcast, which has cited Google as being a ‘legitimate competitor’. However, Google has stated that nothing is guaranteed at the current stage, but a lot can be learned from successfully implementing the Fiber in some cities and shared with others for future development.

Thank you The Verge for providing us with this information
Image courtesy of The Verge

Pre-registration Begins For Mississippi Gigabit Fiber Service

Regional wireless carrier C Spire have big plans, they’re looking to bring gigabit fiber to nine cities in Mississippi and residents in those areas can now pre-register for the service. This is of course a big deal for local residents who can get the service, but it also brings hope to many other cities as providers start installing the high performance, high speed networks in more and more locations.

Offering speeds typically 100x faster than commonly available with incredible upload and download rates to all users. All you need to do is put down a $10 deposit for the service and pick a package. C Spire will offer up $80 for internet only and charge up to $160 for a bundle that includes internet, home phone and cable TV services.

Construction will begin once enough neighbourhoods have registered and paid their deposits. Residents will be able to keep track of the progress of signups and roll out via a special map.

Thank you Engadget for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of Engadget.

Noise Cancelling Tech Could Boost Internet Speeds

According to some new research, the same technology that is used in noise cancelling headphones and other audio device could in fact speed up internet connections. While most people will be familiar with the technology on high end headphones, gaming headsets and Bluetooth mobile phone ear pieces, best used to block out the external noise that can distract from your audio.

The technology works by listening to the outside world, or at least what ever sound hits the back end of your headphones, it then plays a frequency into your eye to counteract that sound and effectively cancel it out, giving you the illusion that the noisy train your sat on, or the screaming baby nearby, or the busy pedestrian area you in, are all nothing but a whisper, so how on earth can this technology help speed up your internet I hear you asking?

A report by Nature Photonics says that this technology could be applied to improve the overall quality, reliability and of course speed of our internet connections by eliminating the signal background noise, allow for improved data transmission and less data loss via fiber optic connections.

By using a light beam transmission that is designed to cancel out any noise associated with the main signal, network speeds could be boosted by a staggering 400%, allowing for speeds of 400 gigabits per second over cables of 12,800 km, which is obviously very fast.

Any improvement to international data connections is a big win and it’s something that could have global benefits in the never ending struggle to keep up with data transmission rate demands that are growing year on year. Of course it’s still early days and there’s no word on how this could be fully implemented into global networks, but it’s a step in the right direction to solving some of the worlds more complex networking problems.

Google Fiber’s Implementation Causing Other ISPs To Ramp Up Servcies

It’s always good to see one company’s action forcing every competitor to enhance their service and the price to stay in the business, because in any case it’s a win-win situation for end users as long as it’s implemented properly. This is a classic example as the presence of Google Fiber and its expansion throughout United States is forcing Internet Service Providers to significantly boost their offerings in their packages before it’s too late.

Time Warner and Comcast does have the infrastructure and capacity to significantly boost the internet speed for the benefit of its subscribers and always could do so as said by an analyst of Bernstein Research, Craig Moffet. He also said that the companies make 97% profit margins on internet services alone.

To those who don’t know, Google Fiber provides 1 Gigabit internet connection and started from Kansas City, then expanding to Austin, Texas and then Provo, Utah. What’s makes this very interesting is that this speed is 100 times more than what an end user gets on an average.

Akamai states when Google Fiber was implemented in Q4 2012 at Kansas City, there was a massive jump in average internet speed consumption in comparison with Q4 2011, showing a boost of 84%. The second highest boost that was observed during this time was in Wyoming with 51% boost. David Belson did publish Akamai’s ‘state of internet report’ noted:

“It could be the case that the other incumbent providers were going, ‘Oh, crap, we stand to potentially lose subscribers to this deal with Google if we don’t provide competitive service,’”

Now that the gigabit speed implementation has help the customers to have one more option to seriously consider, it will be interesting to see how the average internet speed consumption rates after a period of time, and which companies benefits and suffers in gaining and losing their subscriber base.

Source: Technology Review

Apple Just Isn’t Cool Anymore, It’s time for Google to shine.

Several years ago I would have said that Apple Inc was one of the coolest, if not the coolest companies out there. Unfortunately in the past few years it seems that Apple has stopped thinking outside of the box, they have stopped bringing us new and innovative tools and technology. I am sure others are thinking the same as well.

Google appears to be becoming the new Apple, getting bigger each and every day, and continually bringing us new and innovative products and tools. Making huge strides from starting off as a fantastic search engine to becoming one of the largest technology providers to the world.

Here are 10 products that Google has released, or is getting ready to release in the near future, I hope you enjoy.

Google Glass, though we have not seen in detail how Google Glass is going to work, we have been given small teasers showing some of its functions. Google has kicked off a large testing phase, for this hot new product but there not even the slightest assumption as to when it might be ready for release to the public. Though we may see it as early as the beginning of 2014.

Google Nexus 10, Google’s newest tablet, not only does it have a larger display, it is just as powerful as an iPad and you get it all for less money. Plus the Nexus 10 uses the Android OS providing a user friendly interface, and Android is Open Source!

Google Fiber, Google has been considering entering the ISP market for a short time now, wanting to offer customers the fastest possible internet speeds possible, with Sony working with Japanese ISPs to bring out fiber-optic internet other ISPs will need to start thinking about this too! Fiber-Optic is great for television as well!

Google Search, being able to sit at your computer, or using your mobile device you are able to browse the web, and what better way to do this than to use Google Search, being able to search for websites, images and more all from the same site, with easy to use features, where could you go wrong?

Google Play Store, hundreds of thousands of apps to search from, tons of them for free, and you don’t have Apple standing on the sidelines saying no, you can’t have that one, and if you’re a developer, you don’t need to worry about Google not allowing you to share your app with the world.

Android, the fastest growing operating system out there, open source and it is FREE! There are its flaws as everything has some flaws, but it is user friendly, easy to work with, and there are so many features. Did I mention, its FREE?

AdMob, for the mobile advertising market, advertisements are what pave the way for good companies to become great, allowing that extra bit of funding to come in to allow them to continue moving forward. AdMob allows you to promote your apps with ads, to allow you to earn some revenue from your app.

Google Maps, have you ever been lost in a large city, not knowing where you’re going? I have, and not wanting to ask for directions because you are unsure of your surroundings, and in what appears to be in a bad part of town. Google Maps is nearly always reliable and won’t likely have you turning into the side of a building or driving through the middle of a lake.

Google Docs, one of my personal favorites, I have been promoting Google Docs to friends and family alike for several years now. Being able to store your important documents in a safe place, with the ability to edit them on the go and not needing to keep that pesky flash drive available at all times.

Chrome, last but not least. I have made the switch to chrome entirely recently, moving over from Mozilla. It was difficult for me to make the move, but I have adapted quite well, and I doubt that I could ever go back to Mozilla, or move to another browser. Chrome has so many features, and I think I use about all of them.

Now really, Apple can’t top that!

Source

Sony-backed ISP launches fastest internet connection for a home user with 2Gbps speed


So-net Entertainment, Japanese internet service provider backed by Sony, has launched their ‘Nuro’ fiber-based 2Gbps Internet surface, most likely the fastest internet connection in the world for home use. The company uses a service called Gigabit-capable Optics network (GPON) which allows 2.488 Gbps downstream.

The connection started on Monday, and it will provided to homes, apartments and even small businesses in Tokyo and six prefectures. The connection will cost U.S. $51 per month with a 2 year contract, followed by Approx. U.S. $535 as Installation fee which is currently waived off those who apply for the connection via online, which will include optical network unit which is designed to handle high speeds.
The user will be getting an upload speed of 1 Gbps.

The Japanese government has been strongly promoting fiber connections for residences, therefore making them as one of the world leaders for fiber connections. About 25% of the residences in the country use the fiber, which makes it second highest rate in the world to adopt this connection type. UAE starts at #1 spot with over 70%. Most of the population in Tokyo reside in very small apartments, therefore making it easier for the companies to install fiber services. As of now, providing 1Gbps connection is very common.

ONU are used in homes and small business to convert fiber to broadband internet as the speed exceeds the bandwidth throughput of most consumer-grade network adapters, therefore the end users are unlikely to see 2Gbps speeds.

Source: PC World

AT&T ‘Promises’ To Bring 1 Gbps To Austin after Google’s Official Announcement


Google Fiber’s implementation in Austin was recently announced, but AT&T has decided to follow Google with the 1 Gbps connection PR bandwagon. AT&T has put up their press release where they say that they are prepared to offer advanced fiber optic which can provide 1 Gbps.

AT&T further added the following statement “Today, AT&T announced that in conjunction with its previously announced Project VIP expansion of broadband access, it is prepared to build an advanced fiber optic infrastructure in Austin, Texas, capable of delivering speeds up to 1 gigabit per second. AT&T’s expanded fiber plans in Austin anticipate it will be granted the same terms and conditions as Google on issues such as geographic scope of offerings, rights of way, permitting, state licenses and any investment incentives.”

One will be skeptical, but one would expect at the very least that AT&T may offer few FTTH (Fiber to the home) to a selected number of users- or maybe do offer actual fiber to many of its home users, but it won’t be surprising if the network provider decides to cap these lines as AT&T is well-known to do for a very long time. There’s a questionable remark by the company on the press release where it said that upgrades are “not expected to materially alter AT&T’s anticipated 2013 capital expenditures.” Its not possible to have a network infrastructure with a fiber unless one spends money, therefore this should be some form of expenditure.

However AT&T so far has plans which has problems to keep up with cable, let alone fiber. Its been found that AT&T is barely able to provide 5 Mbps connection to many of their customers. To add further, AT&T is mostly concentrating on wireless internet access and large investor returns. So many would see this attempt by AT&T and their promise to provide 1 Gbps fiber connection at the time when Google is offering the same nothing more than hitch-hiking Google’s thunder and PR impact, which could affect AT&T’s DSL customers .

Source: DSL Reports