Man Breaks Into Neighbor’s Apartment Using His Phone and An App

Andy Greenberg from Wired has apparently shown us how easy it is to break in someone’s house nowadays. You don’t need sophisticated lock-picking skills or need to be a professional thief to do it. All you need is an app and an iPhone, as he puts it.

Greenberg used an app called KeyMe, which lets users 3D scan any key and uploads the images to the company’s cloud. Once that is done, you can head over to either one of their kiosks or order a 3D printed copy online.

He apparently went to his neighbor’s appartment, 3D scanned his key in a few seconds using the app and told him that he will be back in his apartment the next day ‘uninvited’. His neighbor did not believe him at first (who would believe you when saying you will break an entry with an iPhone?), but it did surprise him the day after.

KeyMe, KeyDuplicated and Keysave are apps that serve pretty much the same purpose, which is scanning keys. Some even let you scan more complex keys, such as car keys, having KeyMe stating it will even duplicate keys that “do not duplicate”. The service however describes the scanning process to be more complicated than just point the camera and take a picture.

KeyMe states that in order to duplicate a key, customers need to take it off the keychain, scan it on both sides against a white background and from approximately 4 inches away. However, Greenberg told that he did not follow any of the rules when he made his ‘stairwell creep-scans’.

With so many app alternatives and 3D printing aid nowadays, every commercially available piece of tech can be used to break into houses, amongst other ‘unintended’ uses. As Greenberg stated, breaking an entry nowadays has proven to be quite “idiot-proof”.

Thank you Wired for providing us with this information

UK Police Trials The World’s Fastest Face Recognition System

Britain is dubbed the most watched country in the world, with over 6 million CCTV cameras watching everything that moves. This is why the London police aims to further improve its CCTV network use by adding body-worn cameras to help identify ‘criminal activities’ faster.

The new technology is said to still undergo some trials in London, having Leicestershire police already confirming that it has become the first police force in the UK to test NEC’s NeoFace face recognition software in hopes that it will “transform the way criminals are tracked down”. NeoFace aims to identify faces by analysing “dozens” of facial figures from digital images captured by the CCTV system or body cameras and comparing them to the 90,000 photos stored in the Leicestershire Police database.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hfFl6w3vRTw[/youtube]

NeoFace is said to have its strength present in processing power, being able to analyse the figures in a matter of seconds compared to manually searching for possible matches (which is said to take hours to do). While the new tech is just debuting in the UK, it is said to have proven invaluable in the US. Chicago Police Department has stated that the system helped them sort through 4.5 million booking photos in order to find evidence and convict a suspected armed robber.

Thank you Endgadget for providing us with this information

Pirated Windows 7 Found In U.S. Army Base

The government shelled out $50 million USD to Apptricity due to the U.S. Army using Apptricity’s software on more servers and workstations than licensed. Now one soldier stationed in Qatar has stepped forward to reveal that the Army is allegedly using pirated copies of Windows 7 as well.

According to the report, this soldier claims that 18 computers in the education center at his base, Camp As Sayliyah, run unlicensed copies of Windows 7, and has done so for quite a while. Even more, these computers clearly state that the operating system is not a genuine copy of Windows 7.

Images provided to TorrentFreak show one Windows 7 computer displaying the “Windows 7 Professional product key you typed in is invalid for activation” error. Another image has the error message “You must activate today” and another shows “Windows 7, Build 7601, This copy of Windows is not genuine” at the bottom right of desktop.

The soldier told TorrentFreak that currently this is the only time he’s seen a military base running unlicensed Windows software on desktops and laptops. He claims he approached his superior about the piracy issue, but so far nothing has changed.

“I am not anti-government in any way, but I have been in the army a long time and I feel the army should be kept honest and accountable for what they do, especially when it is so public and a hot button issue in these times,” the soldier said.

As TorrentFreak points out, it’s quite possible that the Army has keys for these computers, but they’re misplaced. Maybe the IT administrator didn’t think using pirated copies would be a big deal for the Army overseas. The latter scenario wouldn’t be surprising given the way the Army handled Apptricity’s software, which lead to the lawsuit and $50M settlement.

Regardless, Microsoft may be a bit forgiving given it just signed a $617 million licensing deal to bring Windows 8 to the Army, Air Force, and Defense Information Systems Agency.

Thank you TorrentFreak for providing us with this information
Images courtesy of TorrentFreak