YouTube Create Team to Deal With Takedown Mistakes

YouTube is known as much for its community content as it is for the paid content it wants to introduce. Community content can be anything from the cute cat playing piano video to an action packed music video featuring your favourite movie and video game clips, the latter of which don’t last long online sadly. The reason the video wouldn’t last long is due to the automated copyright system flagging even the smallest piece of content, ending up with videos being taken down for any reason provided. This is set to change with YouTube creating a team to deal with these takedown mistakes.

User created content is the backbone of YouTube and when people are finding their videos being removed, even though they have a genuine right to publish them, they would more likely to leave for one of YouTube’s rival services. The new team will have the purpose of “minimizing mistakes”, with the hopes that with fewer mistakes more content will be left on the site without any legal issues regarding their content.

Alongside the new team, there will also be some new initiatives rolled out in the coming months designed to “strengthen communications between creators and YouTube support”. Including increased transparency for the status of monetization claims, the features you’ll see coming seem to be focused on supporting and developing YouTube content creators as much as the service itself.

 

Facebook Reactions Replace Your Likes With Even More Emotions

So you are on Facebook and you notice your friend has posted an item about something rather sad, or something which really grinds your gears. You hover your mouse over the like button to show that you sympathise with them but then you stop. How can you “like” something which is sad? Don’t worry, Facebook has now expanded how you can respond to posts.

To add to the tradition Like you can now let them feel the warmth of your heart with “Love” or if it was just a good laugh there is always “Haha”. There is “wow” for those moments that just surprise you, “sad” for the times when you wish you didn’t go on Facebook because of the tears and “Angry” for when things are just that little bit too much.

To access these new reactions, the “like” button has been replaced by, surprise suprise, the “reactions” button. Just select the one you want (or release if you are on a touch screen) and your reaction will be noted. The three most popular reactions will be displayed with each event, and notifications will now state that your friends “reacted” to your posts.

As you can see from the image below from our very own Facebook page, the reactions can easily be accessed and even show their little emoticons.

 

EA and Comcast Team up to Bring New Streaming Service

There are a lot of streaming services that bring games to players on their TV. We all know the popular NVIDIA Grid and the company’s constant attempt to make it more popular. Microsoft and Sony are attempting to bring such services to their consoles too, but they still have a long way to get people interested in the latter.

Now Electronic Arts and Comcast made a partnership to bring cloud gaming to your TVs too. All you need is an Xfinity X1 box from Comcast. The really interesting thing here is that the companies are not relying on controllers, but rather encourage people to use their smartphones and tables as their own personal controllers. All they need is an app called Xfinity Games and then navigate to a website on their handsets, enter a code and you’re done. The controls are made out of swiping and tapping gestures.

But are handsets really good controllers? Well, tests proved they are not! The companies found out that it was extremely difficult to control and navigate the Dead Space title, but found out that the handsets are best at controlling cars, so they went on and added the Real Racing to the list of games. They say that this would be the future of online gaming, but is it really true? There are more things to take into account here.

One of the main issues with online stuff is the user’s internet speed. Ok, you get some games that can be controlled remotely, but you still have to think that despite your efforts of delivering and receiving input and game feedback, ISPs around the world are still struggling to deliver actual speeds to have their customers load up a page, yet alone play a fully fledged game remotely. The second one that is applicable here is the controller. You can get some feedback by the handset’s ability to vibrate, but are most games ready for using virtual buttons? I would like to see how someone would play a fast-paced FPS or even RTS titles controlled via a smartphone or tablet.

Nevertheless, there are around 20 titles available for Comcast customers to try out, including NBA, PGA, and Plats vs Zombies. The list is said to be constantly changing based on user feedback and the companies are even thinking of adding third-party titles to the list in the near future.

Thank you Cnet for providing us with this information

Rapoo Launch Force Feedback Enabled Mechanical Keyboard

The new Rapoo keyboard is here and it brings with it a very interesting set of features. The Rapoo KX is wireless, mechanical, features vibration feedback and LED backlighting.

It’s already quite rare to see a wireless mechanical keyboard, but that’s exactly what we have here. It features 5GHz wireless technology and has a range of up to 32 feet. Standby time is 40 hours and there’s a micro-USB charging port should you need to charge it while in use. There are three backlight levels, as well as vibrational force feedback to provide a better typing experience.

The keyboard looks really nice too, with a sleek TKL style design. The black or white versions of the keyboard are available right now from most major retailers with an MSRP of $79.99; it will also be available in a choice of red, yellow and blue in 2015.

Thank you TweakTown for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of Rapoo.

Lian Li Shows off New Wall-Mountable Open-Air Prototypes

Lian Li are trying out their newest prototype cases on Facebook, much in the same fashion they did with their DK-01X Desktop Case. This is an easy and great way to get customer feedback before finalizing a product. This time around Lian Li is teasing us with their newest prototypes of wall-mountable open-air cases.

The new series of cases is planned to have three sizes, mini ITX, micro ATX and ATX. They are all built upon the same principle with the only variation being size and a little bit connectivity. The case itself is made of brushed black aluminium, just like we’re used to it from Lian Li; a material that simply looks great. The top is covered with a tempered glass panel that gives you a great view on the components. This being an open-air case, it has no additional locations to mount case-fans.

The PC-05 measures 400 x 349 x 138mm and supports one slim optical drive as well as two 3.5-inch and two 2.5-inch drives. If the user doesn’t need the dedicated GPU there’s room for two further disks of choice. It has two expansion slots and no system fan. The Front panel has two USB 3.0 and HD Audio ports.

It supports graphic cards up to 200 mm and SFX power supplies up to 125 mm length. The maximum height for the CPU cooler is 80 mm.

The PC-06 features a similar layout, just a bit bigger. It measures 450 x 500 x 153 mm. There will also be a sub-model to support Water cooling called the PC-06S. The S model will have support for up to 360 mm radiators and increases the width from 500 to 546 mm.

The drive support is a little different with three 3.5-inch and one 2.5-inch bays. Without a GPU it has an additional three bays of choice. The front panel has been expanded to 4 USB 3.0 ports, otherwise it’s the same as the smaller version.

This version supports graphics cards up to 290 mm and ATX power supplies up to 170 mm length. The CPU cooler can be 95 mm in this case. There aren’t many components you can’t mount in this case with space like that.

The PC-07 is the biggest of the three and allows for full-sized ATX motherboards. It measures 500 x 524 x 153 mm and there is a water cooling model here too. The PC-07S measures 500 x 570 x 153 mm.

This version supports up to three 3.5-inch and one 2.5-inch drives, and an additional three drives when no GPU is used. It uses the same front panel as the micro ATX model and supports the same sized components.

Sadly we haven’t seen any photos of the PC-06S water-cooling model yet, but these three normal ones look amazing and so does the PC-07S rear shot below. Considering the amount of hard drive space you can get when not using a dedicated GPU, these cases would make for some great server display-cases on your wall. And with the use of a GPU you got a great looking gaming system at hands.

Thank you Lian Li for providing us with this information

Images courtesy of Lian Li

Razer’s Nabu Smartband Said To Be Rolling Out In October

Razer looks to be closer to a final release date for its Nabu smartband than initially thought. A press release earlier this month indicated that Razer is working with mobile gaming developer, Tencent Games, in order to bring ‘Timi Run Everyday’ to the smartband, as well as revealing a fourth quarter release date.

A number of developers and at least 1,000 Razer fans, who got to smartband for $1, have been granted beta access to the device so far. The first changes in the Nabu smartband were noticed at the Electronic Entertainment Expo in June, when the 32 x 32 pixel display was removed due to user feedback. Also, the upper screen is said to have been ignored most of the time, leading to its complete removal and changing the way the larger screen activates.

Even though Razer pointed to the last quarter of 2014 as a release date for the smartband, it is aiming to release the Nabu smartband sooner rather than later. This is why October is said to be the most suitable release date. Also, developers such as Wargaming, Techland, Halfbrick and Shortbreak Studios have signed on for the Nabu smartband. However, no details on what projects they might be working on was released.

Thank you Electronista for providing us with this information

New Version of Valve Steam Controller Comes With Analogue Stick

Valve is going forward with its Steam controller, making changes and releasing new and improved versions. Its latest sneak peek of the new Steam controller version which is currently in development shows that the controller comes with an analogue stick for the very first time, as seen in the pic below.

This new version is said to represent the third major design change shown to the public so far. The original prototype of the Steam controller revealed in September had fewer buttons and two large trackpads, along with a touchscreen. The second one show in January had its touchscreen removed and received two symmetrical sets of ABXY face buttons.

Valve is said to have avoided the analogue stick in previous versions because it wanted to replicate the controller experience using haptic feedback infused trackpads in the form of weighted electro-magnets. Either way, it is not currently certain if this will be the final version of the Steam controller or more changes are to be made before its release.

Thank you Eurogamer for providing us with this information
Image courtesy of Eurogamer

Facebook Policy Agreement Allowed Emotional State Study on 600,000 Users

When signing up for a Facebook account, the majority of users do not read the Facebook Data Use Policy and consider that their private user data is secure. While this is true, this does not mean that Facebook itself can’t use the data you post. This is where Facebook has gathered some data from random account feeds in order to use it in a little social experiment.

Facebook apparently has tweaked the content seen by more than 600,000 users in order to determine whether or not it would affect their emotional state. The study paper has been published under the name of “Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks,” at The Proceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences. Users who like to view it would find how Facebook data scientists tampered the algorithm managing which posts appear on users’ news feeds, having it manage the number of negative and positive posts appearing on users’ news feed. Future posts from users ‘participating’ in the experiment were then analysed over the course of one week in order to determine if they would respond with increased positivity or negativity of their own and thus determining whether emotional states could be transmitted over a social network.

The result turned out to be positive, having users respond to the negativity or positivity of the content manipulated. The scientists have proved that the ‘mood’ can be changed over a social network and the overall point about modern psychology. Also, for concerned Facebook users, the paper states that the data gathered has been within the “internal operations, including troubleshooting, data analysis, testing, research and service improvement.” agreement which everyone had to agreed with before signing up for a Facebook account. In addition to the latter, all personal and private data gathered has been done using the policy’s liberal constraints, having a machine analyse and pick out positive and negative posts.

Adam Kramer is listed as being the lead author for the paper, having him state in an interview that the reason he had joined the social network is that “Facebook data constitutes the largest field study in the history of the world.”. The latter statement proves the sad truth that while users view Facebook as a fun and loving place to post pictures, quotes, places you have been to and personal experience, it is without question a huge ‘research lab’ for some higher-ups as well.

Thank you A.V. Club for providing us with this information
Image courtesy of A.V. Club

Google To Develop ‘Mobile Meter’ App

Although Google knows best how people use the internet,  it also wants to dig a little deeper and monitor the app usage as well. It appears that the company is developing a new mobile apps that compensate users if they allow their mobile behavior to be monitored. From what we know, the project is called “Mobile Meter” and uses iOS and Android apps that intelligently monitor app usage and web browsing habits and send the data back to Google.

Google confirmed the development of the new apps later on, which it says are part of its Screenwise market research project that began rolling out last year. The Mobile Meter apps will replace an older method that allowed panelists to participate, helping Google measure media consumption across all screens but with more accurate results on mobile. Both the Android and iOS apps will be submitted to their relevant app stores in the near future, although only panelists will be able to actually use them. The company states that while there isn’t an open call for volunteers right now, it recruits for panels on an ongoing basis and compensation varies based on the panels people participate in.

The company already passively collects data to improve its apps and resources. The Google Maps app for example, regularly feeds back location metrics to enhance the service. Since Google won’t comment, we don’t know exactly which app and web metrics it intends to track with Mobile Meter. However, it will presumably enable the company to evaluate the different habits of Android and iOS users, gaining an important insight into Apple’s ecosystem. Google will anonymize all of the information it collects to ensure the privacy of its panelists. Given Facebook and Google’s previous mistakes, where private information was made public, Google will need to be transparent over how the opt-in service uses the data it gathers.

Thank you Endgadget for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of Endgadget.