FDA Says Stop Using These IV Drips – You Could Be Hacked

The Food and Drug Administration is responsible for checking and maintaining people’s safety in regards to (surprise surprise) the food and drugs they are given. This time they’ve had to go a step further and “encourage” hospitals to replace a piece of tech from their supply lists and floors before it gets hacked.

Hospira’s Symbiq Infusion System (pictured in the centre above) is being recommended for immediate removal from hospitals all over due to a vulnerability in its ability to be controlled remotely. A third party can gain access to the device and control the dosages remotely which are then administrated by computerised pumps.

This discovery was made by the FDA and the Department of Homeland Security’s Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT for short). First reported on July 21st with a further alert made by the FDA on the 31st July. While they are open to being hacking, there has yet to be a reported instance of it happening.

The hack is done by connecting to the hospital network, allowing Symbiq systems to be remotely controlled. While the unit isn’t sold anymore by Hospira, it is still available from several third-party sellers.

This is the first adventure for the FDA in regards to discussing cybersecurity and the technology that is used to regulate and control food and medicine.

Thank you Yahoo News for the information.

Image courtesy of Biz Journals.

Google Reportedly In Development Of Contact Lenses Which Can Read Glucose Levels

A contact lens which contains a glucose sensor, an antenna, a capacitor and a chip has been developed by Google dedicated to people suffering from diabetes. It does not restrict eyesight and performs analysis of glucose twice every second, afterwards send the information gathered to an external monitoring device with the help of radio waves.

Having 1 in 19 people on the planet dealing with diabetes, it can become like a part-time job to manage. Glucose levels change frequently throughout the day and a close eye must be kept on readings at all times through blood drop tests and other methods. The Google team tasked with the project came up with the contact lens idea, which is made out of chips and sensors that look like bits of glitter and an antenna that is thinner than a human hair. They also overcome the battery issue with the help of radio waves, which provides the necessary electrical energy necessary to power up the sensors inside the lens.

It is said that future models may even include a light source built into the lens that would let wearers know the status of their glucose levels without having to look at the external monitoring device, according to project lead Brian Otis, which can be activated via a blinking feature or the user closing his or her eyes.

Google is currently in talks with the FDA, but they say there is still some more work to be done on it until we see one of these lenses on the market.

Thank you Tech Spot for providing us with this information
Image courtesy of Tech Spot