Adobe Issues Patch For Code-Execution Bug

Flash has long been at the heart of a debate over usability and security. The media player has long been used for everything from Youtube to online games, but it has often by problems with even the fixes containing problems. As a result, people are being told to avoid using the tool and instead using HTML 5, seems like we have yet another reason to listen given the latest patch to try to fix a code-execution bug.

By code-execution bug, we mean that it would be possible to execute code remotely, meaning they could quickly perform actions without your knowledge or say. This exploit is a rather large one, enabling a whole host of problems from the get go rather than others with specific purposes or problems.

The zero-day vulnerability was found by Anton Ivanov, a member of Kaspersky Lab, and was credit as such. Kaspersky Lab researchers have been observing the vulnerability and had seen it used in “a very limited number of targeted attacks”.

With so many vulnerabilities, it comes as no surprise that people are trying to steer away from using Flash. We recommend that if you don’t actively use the tool you remove it from your system, something that could only improve your security given flash’s checkered past. If you do use Flash, then we recommend that you update it now and make sure that you keep checking for security patches.

Microsoft Found a Way to Improve the Battery Life of Wearables

A team of researchers over at Microsoft have finally found a way to improve the battery life of wearables. We all know that the latter don’t come with a big battery pack, so finding workarounds to extend their battery life has always been a priority for manufacturers.

The technique is said to involve pairing wearables with smartphones via Bluetooth or Wi-Fi in order to shift all heavy workloads to the smartphone, hence having your smartphone acting as an external processing unit. This means that your wearable will act mostly as a way of displaying data from your smartphone, having it draw just enough battery to sustain the pairing connection.

Researchers over at Microsoft are said to have tested the system, named WearDrive, on an Android phone. The results showed an improvement of over three times in energy consumption for the wearable and an acceptable energy consumption impact on the handset. In addition, the wearable had its execution performance increase eight times compared to it not being paired to the smartphone.

While wearables don’t have the performance nor battery life of a fully fledged smartphone, the technique seems to help quite a lot in performance as well as battery life. Also, WearDrive is said to automatically deactivate itself when not in range of a paired smartphone, so you don’t have to worry about it running in the background.

Thank you TechSpot for providing us with this information