Man Accused of Blocking Cell Phones on Subway

We use our mobile phones for everything these days, from playing your latest game or reading your latest to talking about the last few days to your friends. Sometimes you just want to escape this, as a man from Chicago wanted when he started blocking cell phones on his daily subway trip.

Undercover officers arrested a 63-year-old man, who according to his lawyers just wanted to have a little quiet on his commute. The device he used to get that quiet was apparently imported from China, being used to block signals going to and from cell phones in his train car.

Dennis Nicholl’s lawyer stated that “he’s disturbed by people talking around him”. While this may be the case, people have been fined up to $48, 000 for using cell phone jammers, something that apparently Nicholl’s was doing for a while now.

The police were apparently told months ago and had even managed to obtain his photo, the end result being the undercover police. With a picture of Nicholl’s using the device on the subway, it was only a matter of time before they acted on the information. The charge Nicholl’s now faces is “unlawful interference with a public utility”, something he was also charged with back in 2009 for the same action.

£500 Battery Opened – Contains Only £22 Worth of Batteries!

We’ve all had bad experiences with buying things, from ordering something online and never receiving it to misrepresenting a product to the point where you can sell something completely different from what people are expected to buy. This is even worse when the technology you use is something quite expensive, and replacement components costing quite a bit. At least, that seemed the case until Markus Fuller revealed a shocking secret via YouTube.

The Nagra VI (6) Digital recorder is used by a lot of people for recording everywhere including your favourite TV shows to the latest movies. In the video, you can see Fuller take off the case to reveal components that add up to £22 worth of batteries, which is terrible given that the model he takes apart would set you back £498.

If you ever wondered what £500 worth of batteries looked like the video may come as a bit of a disappointment as the small battery pack comes with just 6 batteries that are often used in laptops.

I don’t know about you but when you have to pay £500 for a replacement battery, you expect to receive at least a fraction of the cost to cover in the quality you receive.  With each battery only costing £3.75 each, replacing the whole pack in the replacement would cost you less than 5% of the cost they are charging you. What adds insult to injury is that in the pack he takes apart, only two of the batteries are “dead”, meaning that for £7.50 you can replace a battery pack that would cost you hundreds.

NASA’s ‘ShadowNet’ Revealed To Be 10x Faster than Google Fiber

Google promised to bring internet speeds 1,000 faster than the current average internet speed found in homes around the US through Google Fiber. The connection, which is around 10 Gigabits per second, might be something seen only in sci-fi movies. However, NASA tends to disagree.

The space agency allegedly uses a shadow internet called ESnet, which is short for Energy Science Network, capable of delivering cross-country speeds of 91 Gigabits per second, deemed the fastest connection ever reported.

However, these speeds will not reach normal home connections anytime soon. NASA is using this shadow network to explore the next wave of computing applications. The U.S. Department of Energy is apparently running ESnet, having it be an important tool for researchers who require large amounts of data handled for projects such as the Large Hadron Collider and Human Genome Project.

The use of such technology leads back to how the Internet was born and eventually became the most important piece of technology used by everyone today. This is why ESnet and Internet2, a non-profit international network built-in 1995 for researchers after the Internet was commercialised, might hold the key of faster internet speeds in the future.

Also, equipment capable of handling high-speed internet, similar to what ESnet currently provides, has been out on the market since 2010. However, the Internet is not a straight line. Each piece of data needs to pass through various nodes before reaching its destination, similar to what a driver has to do when reaching an intersection. As a driver, you are required to slow down and even stop in order to check if you are clear to proceed on your way through the intersection. The same principle applies to data packets through a node.

ESnet is proof that internet speeds which most people only dream of can be achieved. With a lot of effort and probably some luck, similar internet speeds could be available on the commercial market in the future.

Thank you Wired for providing this information
Image courtesy of Wired