Verizon Enterprise Breach Leads to 1.5 Million Customers Records Up For Sale

It’s not been a good year for Verizon. Earlier this month we reported on the fact that the company had been fined by the FCC for “supercookie” tracking, and now it would seem that Verizon Enterprise has been breached resulting in 1.5 million customer records being put up for sale.

The revelation comes as a seller has begun advertising the sale of a database with information for 1.5 million customers of Verizon entertainment, all being offered for the price of $100,000. If you feel like that is a little much you can buy 100,000 records for just $10,000. The thread also contains the option to buy information about security vulnerabilities in Verizon’s website, leading people to question just how safe their data is.

In response, Verizon stated that they had “recently discovered and remediated a security on our enterprise client portal”. Regarding the data itself they state that “an attacked obtained basic contact information on a number of our enterprise customers”.

This would appear to authenticate that the data is real although it may not be as juicy and chock filled with information as some might hope it is. This only looks bad for Verizon Enterprise as they are the ones commonly finding flaws and reporting on breaches like these every year. If you were wondering just how much that could have an impact on people, Verizon’s Enterprise client list includes 99% of Fortune 500 companies.

Klingon is Covered by Copyright Claims Paramount

Star Trek is a series loved and followed by millions, with everyone and their parents having grown up with the adventures of the starship Enterprise. Sadly a short film made by fans to cover a gap in the universe could be stopped as it would appear that Klingon is covered by copyright.

Klingons are one of, if not the most, well-known races in the star Trek universe. Being a warrior race by nature, it was always referenced (and was a key part of James T Kirks character) that the Federation and the Klingons had gone to war. A fan film created by Alec Peters looked to explore this war but seems like it may never see the light of day due to a copyright claim made by Paramount and CBS, the holders of Star Treks intellectual property.

After being told it wasn’t detailed enough the claim has now been updated to cite several instances where the fan film presses on Star Trek’s copyright. This includes the gold command shirts and even the pointed Vulcan ears, but the claim also goes on to state that the entire Klingon language is covered under copyright.

Is it possible to copyright an entire language (fictional or real world)? Should the fan made the film, which has been funded by a Kickstarter project none the less, be stopped by the copyright claim or should they come to a deal to create the film with the full support of the company?

You can read the full document listing every single copyright infringement in the film here.

OCZ Z-Drive 6000 NVMe U.2 SSDs Get Dual Port Functionality

Enterprises need a whole different level of redundancy than the average consumer and there are many solutions in that regard, may it be RAID setups to prevent data loss and downtime during a drive fail or redundant power supplies, but what to do when you need redundant access to one modern storage drive? You pick one of OCZ’s Z-Drive 6000 or Z-Drive 6300 drives that now are available with dual-port functionality.

The Z-Drive 6000’s addition of dual port connection enables two host systems to concurrently access data from the same storage device or the more likely scenario which is to provides a redundant access path to the drive. The new feature will give the drives SAS-like features such as High Availability (HA) that storage architects have come to rely on.

“OCZ is excited to offer our customers this robust new firmware that enables the Z-Drive 6000 series to be a compelling solution, not only for low latency, high performance compute applications, but now also for storage-class applications where the additional enterprise-class features are required to compliment latency and performance,” said Daryl Lang, Vice President, SSD Product Enablement, Toshiba America Electronic Components.

The now dual-ported Z-Drive 6000 series is an overall amazing storage solution that supports the real-time I/O needs of business-critical enterprise applications and virtual infrastructures which require high bandwidth and low latency performance, but also need redundancy. The redundant data access now also eliminates another single point of failure in systems. Dual-port isn’t the only new addition to the Z-Drive 6000 series that now also features enhancements such as multiple namespaces, non-binary sector sizes, and self-encrypting drive (SED) with Crypto Erase.

 

NVMe drives have taken storage to a whole new level and the Z-Drive 6000 series in a prime example of such a solution. The drives can perform with a sustained I/O performance over 700,000 IOPS for 4K random read and a consistent low latency of just 30 µs. The U.2-based Z-Drive 6000 SSDs are hot-swappable and designed for a wide range of storage infrastructures with capacities available from 800GB to 6.4TB and come as both read-intensive and mixed workload models.

Customers who have deployed final hardware and firmware Z-Drive 6000 SSDs and wish to upgrade to dual port firmware should contact OCZ Product Management for more details. More details on the drives themselves can be found on the official product page.

Thecus Announces Launch of Two New Rackmount NAS


Thecus announced the launch of two new enterprise-grade NAS with 12 and 16 bays and packed with plenty of features and connectivity while running on Haswell Xeon processors. The new N12580 and N16850 offer massive scalability on top of their cross-platform file sharing, schedulable snapshots, and resilient data integrity for a working environment that won’t let your enterprise down.

The two new servers come equipped with the Intel’s Haswell Xeon E3-1231 v3 3.4GHz processor and the C224 chipset. They are equipped with 16GB DDR3 ECC RAM but support up to 32GB each. Four RJ45 LAN ports allow for plenty of connectivity and the units come with plenty of USB 2.0 and 3.0 ports too. Inside the NAS’, you’ll find an 8-lane (x1) or 4-lane (x2) and 1-lane (x1) PCI-E slot for further expansions. All that coupled together should make the N12850 and N16850 deliver lightning fast, persistent throughput speeds while offering the requirements necessary to efficiently complete CPU-consuming tasks and serves more concurrent tasks at the same time.

“Businesses today are seeking a NAS system that can best handle the demanding day-to-day high storage needs that occur in the workplace. Our new enterprise-class N12850 and N16850 NAS series are the solution. With advanced data protection and integrity mechanisms, these rackmounts NAS provide the ideal choice for storing a business’s crucial data.” said Florence Shih, CEO of Thecus Technology Corp.

With native support for both SAS and SATA drives, users can experience the superior storage performance of 12G SAS and 6G SATA drives for a flexible storage environment. These new models are 10GbE ready and support High Availability for system redundancy. The units also deploy Daisy Chaining via SAS technology which offers connections to four additional D16000 units, allowing users to reach storage capacities of up to 640TB. Impressive.

These new units also come with some new features which include Virtualization, Volume encryption, Free Intel Security, Thecus App Center and User Profiles. This new enterprise series delivers significant improvements in design, performance, and user experience.

Key Specifications

  • Intel Haswell XEON processor
  • 16GB DDR3 ECC RAM
  • AES-NI hardware encryption engine
  • Redundant power supply
  • 4 x USB 2.0 ports, USB 2 x 3.0 ports
  • 1 x VGA port
  • 6G SATA and SAS 12G compatibility
  • Hot-swappable hard drives
  • RAID 0, 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, 60 and JBOD

The new Thecus N16850 and N12850 servers are expected to begin shipping globally in April, so that will be very soon and the wait won’t be long.

Fulfil Your Starfleet Dreams With This USS Enterprise Drone

Space, the final frontier. Sadly, very few are currently able to go explore space, even with the internal space station or even NASA’s plans to inhabit mars. We can still see the stars, in the night sky and in the movies, with J.J. Abrams directing the next Star Wars film and the Star Trek films never ending. Sometimes though you want to feel closer to the action and with a little help from Spin Master you may be able to with your very own Enterprise drone.

By using their quadcopter as a base, Spin Master was able to place all four of the rotors blades into the saucer section leaving the main body and nacelles of the famous interstellar vessel to include lights and even ten “authentic” sound effects. Aside from the see-through cage of the saucer section that holds the rotors the vessel does look remarkably similar to the initial design of Kirk’s vessel.

Costing around $120 (around £83), the NCC-1701-A drone will come with an all too familiar controller for those who grew up with remote controlled cars, meaning that you won’t be seeing a Star Trek app for this creation. With warp speed sounds and nostalgia included, I know plenty of people who will be buying this, both for themselves and far too many Trekkies to count. So when can we order our Klingon War Birds?

Smithsonian Museum Restoring Original 1967 USS Enterprise

2016 marks the 50th anniversary of the debut of Star Trek and it’s sure to be celebrated by the millions of fans of the series worldwide. With the next movie, Star Trek Beyond, on the way and rumours of a new TV series abound, it’ll definitely be an anniversary for Trekkies to remember. Not to be left out, the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum have set about restoring the original 1967 USS Enterprise model that was used in the filming of all 79 episodes of the original series.

The model had been on display in the Smithsonian since it was donated back in 1974, but in September 2015, was taken off public showing due to the time taking its toll on the model leaving it in need of conservation. The team plan to have the model back on display later this year in the Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall, to mark the museum’s 40th anniversary in July and Star Trek’s 50th in September. The aim of the conservation is to restore the model to its appearance in the Trouble With Tribbles episode from August 1967, which featured the last modification made to the ship during the show’s production. Trekkie’s can rest easy knowing the iconic model is in good hands, with the conservation team having collective experience spanning over 100 movies, including 8 Star Trek flicks (and four episodes of Star Wars).

The Smithsonian have shared a number of images of the work in progress on their blog, showing off more of the ins-and-outs of the model than any episode of the series would show. It’s definitely good that great effort is being made to maintain this iconic piece of sci-fi history, instead of simply remaining on display until it falls apart.

Seagate Launches Their Own Helium HDD

Even as rival HGST started shipping helium based drives several years back, Seagate had managed to keep up in terms of capacity with less exotic technology. That’s all set to change as Seagate has finally launched their own helium based 10TB HDD. The new drive will do battle with the PMR based HGST Ultrastar He10 which just started shipping two months ago while the slower SMR based Ultrastar Archive Ha10 launched 7 months ago.

Just like the HGST drive, the Seagate® Enterprise 3.5 Capacity HDD features seven platters and 14 heads to read and write from them. With a helium fill, Seagate is probably running the drive at 7200rpm unlike normal drives which generally have to slow down when the platter count reaches 6. As an enterprise drive, it comes with a choice of either the standard SATA 3 port as well as the 12Gb/s SAS connector.

Reported reliability is the same as its chief competitor with 2.5 million hours MTBF, a nice bump over the usual 2 million. Due to the helium fill reducing turbulence nad allowing more platters, Seagate has stuck with PMR (perpendicular magnetic recording) and not with the performance crippling SMR (shingled magnetic recording). HAMR also isn’t used since that will probably be done with air-filled drives first. While HGST/WD has beaten Seagate to the punch with Helium, Seagate may bring HAMR out first given they’ve been talking about it a lot more.

Seagate Enterprise NAS 6TB HDD Four Disk RAID Review

Introduction


We’ve already had the pleasure of a single drive review of Seagate’s Enterprise NAS 6TB HDDs and today it has become time for the RAID review. Thecus provided me with five of these drives, but I’ll only be using four in this review today. Four is a magic number when it comes to RAID and the fifth drive would most likely be set as global spare in most systems anyway, so no point in added it. Four drives also give us a great consistency with other RAID reviews done in the past.

Seagate’s Enterprise NAS drives come in capacities ranging from 1TB and all the way up to 8TB, but I only got the 6TB models in today. The Enterprise NAS series is designed for cloud-based systems and NAS application. They offer support for the use in systems with up to 16 drive bays which is a double up compared to what consumer NAS drives offer. It is very important to use a drive that is properly suited for your area of operation and not just pick any random cheap drive from the shelve. A farmer wouldn’t use an SUV to plow his fields either, it’s just not built for the task. So forget all about misleading Backblaze reports as the figures, features, and warranties speak for themselves here.

The 6TB Seagate Enterprise NAS HDD comes with 128MB cache and a spindle speed of 7200RPM. This is quite a bit more than the variable speeded drives that come with a maximum speed of 5400RPM. This makes the drives a little louder, but the Enterprise NAS HDD is surprisingly silent compared to other 7200RPM drives and only generates 2.5 bels during idle and 2.7 bels maximum during seek operations.

The average seek times are set to 8.5ms reading and 9.5ms writing. The performance is rated with up to 216MB/s sustained data rate and an average read/write rate of 154MB/s. You can run the drive in harsher environments as the Enterprise NAS HDD will work from zero to 70 degrees and can withstand up to 70Gs shocks at 2ms read and 40Gs at 2ms write. This 6TB version is built with 12 heads total for the 6 1TB disks it houses.

The Enterprise NAS drives have a long endurance and great workload ratings. The endurance is rated for 300TB a year and they have a 1.2 million hour mean time before failure rating. Seagate is also backing these drives with a 5-Year warranty and also offers optional 5-Year Rescue Data Recovery options.

The available Rescue Data Recovery Service options can save the day when the worst case scenario happens. It is an extra feature that you might want to consider when dealing with your important data. Any company is more or less lost when they lose their digital data. Seagate Recovery Services (SRS) can save the day in the following situations: RAID controller failure, Lost RAID configuration, accidental reconfiguration, accidental re-initialization of the RAID array, power surges that cause multiple drive failures simultaneously, missing RAID partitions, reformatted RAID partitions, virus damage, natural disaster, human error and drive failures. Most data can be recovered in-lab with a nearly 90% success rate.

The drives are built on customer proven technologies coupled with the newest density platters that allow for lower power consumptions, smaller overall footprint, and lower total cost of ownership over previous drive generations. The RV sensors provide strong reliable performance and the controller is flashed with NAS-optimized firmware for balanced reads and writes.

The drives naturally support ATA8 streaming commands, NCQ, and are performance tuned for RAID applications. On-the-fly ECC algorithms make sure that the data arrives as it should and S.M.A.R.T. allows you to check on the drives status and health.

The PCB of the Seagate Enterprise NAS 6TB HDDs is well protected and the HDD controller and motor controller both feature heat transfer pads to help them stay cool in hot environments. The 128MB cache on the HDD is provided by an SK Hynix chip.

Features:

  • Enterprise-class reliability and performance for cloud-based storage and NAS applications in 1- to 16-bay enclosures
  • 1.2 million hours MTBF for enterprise-class reliability
  • 300TB-per-year workload rating for mid-range NAS and cloud-based storage
  • Backed by the Seagate 5-Year Limited Warranty
  • 7200-RPM spindle speed performance
  • Double the cache size, 256MB multisegmented on 8TB capacity, 128MB on the other sizes
  • Dual-stage actuators to deliver precision seeks every time
  • SATA 6Gb/s interface for easy integration into NAS and RAID rackmount systems
  • RV sensor for sustained performance and reliability
  • Optional 5-year Rescue Data Recovery Service plan protects against data loss in NAS and RAID environments.

Specifications

The specifications are taken directly from the manufacturers homepage at the time of the review and might as such be subject to possible future changes.

The Unique World Of 2016 Cyber Security Predications

2016 is here and I still want my hoverboard, by this, I mean an authentic Back to the Future machine and not the cheap plastic device that is currently being marketed. Anyway, this year promises to be compelling for a number of reasons including Cyber Security and the nature of locking data away from the many threats that now lurk within the Cyber walls. Various individuals have had their predictions concerning the coming year’s potential cyber security issues and I thought it would be interesting to convey a selection of the many theories below.

A Cyber Attack will look to exploit the 2016 US presidential election
This may be classed as an outside possibility, even though it would be technically possible whether it will happen is a different matter, this prediction arrives courtesy of Ryan Olson, director of threat intelligence for Palo Alto Network who states that hackers could look to obtain private information from candidates via emails or social network accounts.  Any sensitive information that might be released could, in theory, sway an election, unless you’re Mr Trump who says what he thinks anyway.

Virtual Boarders that control access to the Internet
This theory is far from new, but could be a reality if certain powerful figures are able to exert major control over the internet.  According to Kaspersky Lab, we could see a development of Internet borders that divide access to information along country lines.

Hacked data could become a huge commodity
2015 became the year of the hack and included everything from Dating websites to the leaking of huge databases containing sensitive government details, according to Dmitri Alperovitch, CTO and co-founder of Crowdstrike, who states that hackers are aiming to build up huge stocks of information that contain multiple strands of data. This could lead to blackmailageddon, or something equally terrifying, whereby extortion attacks on individuals and companies are widespread.

Chinese VS Russian Hackers
This one sounds like an opening scene from Rush Hour, but no, according to experts with IID predict, as China’s economy stops growing, many cyber hackers might turn from Cyber espionage to cybercrime. This could then lead to criminal activity that is far bigger than that of Easton Europe.  Is it possible?  You never know considering the technical expertise many hackers possess in china.

Cyber attacks will destroy a major brand or product.  
This prediction from Mark Painter who is a security evangelist for Hewlett-Packard Enterprises is quite feasible considering the many holes which exist within certain tech products.  This individual states that “We are increasingly close to finding out in 2016 if a major product will shut down due to security issues”. Adobe Flash springs to mind considering we all know companies would quite happily cut their losses if a product becomes more trouble than it’s worth.

Will any of these come true?  Only time will tell, especially if Ronald McDonald becomes president.

Image courtesy of PCWorld

Hololens Predicted to Focus on Enterprise Instead of Game Development

Microsoft’s Hololens utilizes a high-definition stereoscopic 3D head-mounted display, and spatial sound which allows developers to create truly unique experiences using augmented reality. This revolutionary VR technology has been demoed by Microsoft and showcased its potential to revolutionize gaming. Theoretically, it’s possible to interact with worlds in a tactile manner and feel more connected with the gameplay. Although, rather unsurprisingly, it seems the Hololens technology is primarily designed for enterprise scenarios as it could be difficult to integrate with complex modern titles.

In an interview with Gamingbolt, Chris Pruett from Robot Invader discussed the viability of Hololens as a gaming device and said:

”It’s too early to tell! But I think that it’s likely to be targeted at enterprise rather than games, at least at first,” 

He also weighed in on the development process for the PlayStation VR game, Dead Secret:

“VR in general is very difficult to get right from a game play perspective. Many of the common game design patterns used for years on console and PC games simply do not apply to VR. We mentioned the HUD and user interface above, but there are many other areas that are similarly affected. Creating a comfortable motion system, for example, is very hard.”

“Our approach to locomotion is designed around the basic properties of the human vestibular system, and we did a whole lot of user testing to make sure we’d gotten it right. There are many areas like this that we take for granted when playing on a TV that must be completely rethought for VR.”

It’s clear there are some major pitfalls when trying to create games on the Hololens. That’s not to say it won’t be used for this purpose in the future, but it looks set to be a niche device for the enterprise market.

Seagate 6TB Enterprise NAS HDD Review

Introduction


When Thecus sent me the amazing N7770-10G NAS a little while ago, they also sent along five of Seagate’s Enterprise NAS 6TB hard disk drives. While they are intended for NAS usage as the drive name already suggests, they still deserve a review on their own.

Seagate’s Enterprise NAS drives come in capacities ranging from 1TB and all the way up to 8TB, but I only got the 6TB models in today. The Enterprise NAS series is designed for cloud-based systems and NAS application and support the use in systems with up to 16 drive bays, double that of the consumer NAS drives. It is very important to use a drive suited for your area of operation and not just pick any random cheap drive from the shelve. A farmer wouldn’t use an SUV to plow his fields either, it’s just not built for the task. So forget all about misleading Backblaze reports, the figures, features, and warranties speak for themselves here.

The 6TB Seagate Enterprise NAS HDD comes with 128MB cache and a spindle speed of 7200RPM. This is also quite a bit more than the variable speeded drives that have a maximum speed of 5400RPM. This makes the drives a little louder, but the Enterprise NAS HDD is surprisingly silent compared to other 7200RPM drives and only generates 2.5 bels during idle and 2.7 bels maximum during seek operations.

The average seek times are set to 8.5ms reading and 9.5ms writing. The performance is rated with up to 216MB/s sustained data rate and an average read/write rate of 154MB/s. You can run the drive in harsher environments as the Enterprise NAS HDD will work from zero to 70 degrees and can withstand up to 70Gs shocks at 2ms read and 40Gs at 2ms write. This 6TB version is built with 12 heads total for the 6 1TB disks it houses.

The Enterprise NAS drives have a long endurance and great workload ratings. The endurance is rated for 300TB a year and they have a 1.2 million hour mean time before failure rating. Seagate is also backing these drives with a 5-Year warranty and also offers optional 5-Year Rescue Data Recovery options.

The available Rescue Data Recovery Service options can save the day when the worst case scenario happens. It is an extra feature that you might want to consider when dealing with your important data. Any company is more or less lost when they lose their digital data. Seagate Recovery Services (SRS) can save the day in the following situations: RAID controller failure, Lost RAID configuration, accidental reconfiguration, accidental re-initialization of the RAID array, power surges that cause multiple drive failures simultaneously, missing RAID partitions, reformatted RAID partitions, virus damage, natural disaster, human error and drive failures. Most data can be recovered in-lab with a nearly 90% success rate.

The drives are built on customer proven technologies coupled with the newest density platters that allow for lower power consumptions, smaller overall footprint, and lower total cost of ownership over previous drive generations. The RV sensors provide strong reliable performance and the controller is flashed with NAS-optimized firmware for balanced reads and writes.

The drives naturally support ATA8 streaming commands, NCQ, and are performance tuned for RAID applications. On-the-fly ECC algorithms make sure that the data arrives as it should and S.M.A.R.T. allows you to check on the drives status and health.

The PCB of the Seagate Enterprise NAS 6TB HDDs is well protected and the HDD controller and motor controller both feature heat transfer pads to help them stay cool in hot environments. The 128MB cache on the HDD is provided by an SK Hynix chip.

Features:

  • Enterprise-class reliability and performance for cloud-based storage and NAS applications in 1- to 16-bay enclosures
  • 1.2 million hours MTBF for enterprise-class reliability
  • 300TB-per-year workload rating for mid-range NAS and cloud-based storage
  • Backed by the Seagate 5-Year Limited Warranty
  • 7200-RPM spindle speed performance
  • Double the cache size, 256MB multisegmented on 8TB capacity, 128MB on the other sizes
  • Dual-stage actuators to deliver precision seeks every time
  • SATA 6Gb/s interface for easy integration into NAS and RAID rackmount systems
  • RV sensor for sustained performance and reliability
  • Optional 5-year Rescue Data Recovery Service plan protects against data loss in NAS and RAID environments.

Specifications

The specifications are taken directly from the manufacturers homepage at the time of the review and might as such be subject to possible future changes.

Addonics Announces Complete Family of Industrial or Enterprise Grade SSDs

Addonics announced a new family of SSDs that support the CFast, mSATA and M2 form factors in both Industrial or Enterprise class grades. The difference between the two types is the type of NAND used. The Industrial class modules are built with SLC NAND where the Enterprise class modules are made with MLC NAND.

These new storage modules are all rated for operation in industrial temperatures ranging from minus 45 to plus 80 degrees Celcius. They are also some of the most reliable SSDs on the market, a thing that easily can be spotted in the TBW and MTBF ratings. For example, a 64GB SLC mSATA modules comes with a TBW rating of 3448 TB and the same module with MLC NAND has a TBW of 635TB for the 256GB model. All come with an MTBF of over 3 million hours.

Which type you pick is down to the operations they need to perform. MLC is more energy-efficient, has more capacity, and it is faster, but the SLC has more durability and a longer lifetime expectancy. Addonics new Industrial and Enterprise SSDs range from 4GB to 256GB capacity and Addonics also offers a full line of converters, readers, and duplicators for the most common SSD form factors.

Suggested retail prices of the Addonics Industrial grade mSATA Flash SSD is $325 for 32GB. The Enterprise class mSATA SSD starts at $54 for 32G. You can also check out the full details on the official new landing page for Addonics Flash media and SSDs: http://addonics.com/category/fm-ssd.php

Dell to Acquire EMC for $50 Billion

In what is expected to be one of the largest tech takeovers ever, Dell is set to wholly acquire enterprise giant EMC on Monday. This follows up a string of other storage-related acquisitions and purchases as well as others relating to computing as a whole. Dell itself was also taken over not too long ago by founder Michael Dell who took the company private with help from Silver Lake.

Dell managed to regain control of his namesake company back in 2013 with a $25 billion investment. At double that amount, EMC may prove a tough pill to swallow. No one knows the pains of acquiring a company valued over twice of their own than AMD, who suffered massive issues in the wake of their relatively miniscule $5.6 billion takeover of ATI. At double its value, the EMC purchase will rely heavily on bonds, something that may be risky given the current financial situation.

The move to acquire Dell does make a whole lot of sense as firm pivots away from a consumer focus and towards the more lucrative enterprise market. EMC either owns or holds a stake in a wide range of enterprise business with names like VMware, RSA Security, Iomega and Syncplicity. It will be interesting to see how these two tech giants merge and manage their huge portfolio.

Thank you re/code for providing us with this information 

Qualcomm Unveils 24 Core ARM Server Processor

Ever since ARM took over the mobile world, we’ve been hearing about how the RISC architecture was trying to expand into other higher performance areas. While ARM first entered the server world via relatively weaker micro-servers, it looks like performance options are coming along soon. Qualcomm, one of the major ARM partners and licensees, has unveiled their first 24-core server processor.

Running off the latest ARMv8-A instruction set, the chip will be part of Qualcomm’s Server Development Platform and part of a stack of server tools. While details on the chip itself have been slim, we do know that it is based off a FinFET process, meaning either TSMC 16nm or Samsung 14nm. The core is also fully custom meaning it is not like the A57/A53 found int he Snapdragon 808/810 and given the server environment, probably isn’t Qualcomm’s in-house 64bit Kyro architecture found in the Snapdragon 820.

Along with the Soc, the SDP  also includes server-class PCIe and storage interconnects. Other hardware requirements like ethernet and FPGA are to be proved by Mellanox and Xilinix respectively. On the software side, SDP comes with a software stack capable of running a KVM Linux hypervisor, OpenStack DevStack, and guest Linux distributions running Apache and WordPress as shown in the demo.

With a complete package available, Qualcomm stands a good chance at breaking into the server market. The biggest question is if ARM will be able to bring the same performance to the table as x86 does while still remaining more power efficient and cheap. This is especially true of single threaded IPC where Intel has historically dominated.

Thecus Adds Seagate 8TB Enterprise HDDs to Official Compatibility List

Thecus announced the addition of Seagate’s impressive 8TB Enterprise 3.5-inch hard disk drives to its official compatibility list. By incorporating Seagate’s 8TB HDD, Thecus NAS users will be able to maximize storage capacity while experiencing enhanced performance and reliability.

Hard drives aren’t just hard drives and there is a lot of difference in them and it’s quite important to pick one that is suited for your task, especially when your dealing with mission critical data. The Seagate 8TB Enterprise HDDs boast the industry’s best response times and are on their own over 100% faster than their own previous generation. These drives are naturally designed to support 24/7 performance and can stand up to a workload of 550TB per year. Other advanced technologies including PowerBalance, PowerChoice, and Raid Rebuilt enables users to customize their big data requirements and optimize TCO.

“Providing compatibility to new, cutting-edge technologies is essential to Thecus and allows users to utilize the best the industry has to offer with their Thecus NAS,” said Florence Shih, CEO at Thecus Technology Corp. “Pairing the 8TB Seagate Enterprise 3.5 Hard Drives with Thecus NAS empower organizations using big data with a reliable, high-capacity storage solution.”

The drives are available as both SAS 12Gbps, SAS 6Gbps, and SATA 6Gbps versions, allowing you to make the right choice depending on what Thecus NAS you might be running. You can check out the full compatibility list for your Thecus model on the official website.

Wandering Around a Rendered USS Enterprise In Unreal Engine 4

Technology has provided a platform for many fan made creations which have risen to prominence over the years, from intricately detailed worlds in Minecraft to imaginative landscapes which have garnered a huge following. Star Trek is one such Sci Fi phenomenon which has certainly given rise to its fair share of individually constructed projects, well, a talented individual has taken his obsession for the famous Enterprise to a whole new creative level.

The project in question is by the name of “The Enterprise Construction Project” and is the brain child of an extremely creative 3D artist by the name of “Jason”. His target goal is to construct all 42 decks of the USS Enterprise NCC-1701-D in the Unreal Game Engine 4”  Below is the video which, as you can see is both lovingly and exquisitely rendered, so much so that the artist states the following,

Creating all of them will be a daunting task. I have compiled a large archive of reference from production drawings, set blueprints, official blueprints, and of course meticulous screen captures of the HD Blu-ray versions of the episodes.”

It’s astonishing to imagine the lengths which have been planned to obtain such an extensive reference list of materials with the aim of replicating the finer details.

https://youtu.be/uK9ijZeHWjI

Below is two screenshots of the level of detail which have been conveyed within this model, the luminosity of the planet/star and the fluid movement of the Asteroids capture the imagination of the viewer.

It is certainly impressive considering one person has achieved this level of detail, the textures and visual representations are immersive and according to the website, Jason’s main objective is to ” create the entirety of the USS Enterprise NCC-1701-D in the Unreal Game Engine. The Enterprise would serve first and foremost as a virtual museum. Every deck and room can be explored” Other potential phases include a “populated ship containing Federation citizens and Starfleet” and also “Different Planetary Systems.”

It’s a fascinating and fabulous project which has the potential for wider exposure within many outlets while keeping fans entertained.

Thank you roadtovr and enterprise3dproject for providing us with this information.

Hewlett-Packard To Cut Up To 30,000 Jobs As Part Of Restructuring

Rapid expansion can have one fatal flaw, if you do not match or beat revenue expectations then you will have to eventually downsize your company. HP have found this out, or the employees to put it more accurately, have taken the brunt of another round of expected job cuts with the figure being somewhere in the region of 25,000 – 30,000 positions to fall.

The technology stalwart has confirmed these roles will go from HP Enterprise; this is with the aim of bundling together its data analysis and software divisions which in turn separates them from the personal computer and printer operation. This brutal scythe cutting will be completed by the end of October 2015; this is on top of 55,000 jobs which have already been culled over the last 3 years. HP aim to save around $2 billion annually from its business by reducing costs which include wages.

Chief executive Meg Whitman, who will lead HP Enterprise, informed investors of the potential to profit to the tune of around $50bn in annual revenue from the business. HP insists the company will be nimbler and therefore able to meet the “evolving needs of our customers around the world”.  The New York Times Square Stock Exchange has reacted badly, as expected to news of both further layoffs and also uncertainty over the direction of HP, it has lost 33% of its value in the year to date

Unfortunately, HP lost touch of the ever-evolving trend of consumer tech over the last decade or so, gone are the bulky towers and a large staffed manufacturing base with which to churn out consumer tech. Computers are now associated with tablets and smartphones and the trend of lighter gadgets have propelled a new innovation onto the market. HP will need to adjust or face further uncertainty, it’s a shame that ordinary employees are facing the brunt and employment is very uncertain considering the intense competition for fewer jobs within the world of tech.

Thank you sky news for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of devicebox

Seagate Announces Three New 8TB Hard Disk Drives

Seagate announced that not one but three new 8TB hard disk drives have been added to their portfolio. The three new drives are from the Seagate Enterprise Capacity, Seagate Enterprise NAS, and Seagate Kinetic HDD series and all got the 8TB upgrade. While these aren’t the first 8TB drives, they are worth a closer look as they’re a force in themselves.

The first new 8TB drive comes from the Enterprise Capacity 3.5 HDD series and this is where reliability meets high-capacity. The drive is aimed at the cloud markets where I’m sure that it will be welcome with open arms. The drive performs with a 100 percent increase in random read and write performance compared to its previous generation. That is quite an accomplishment and impressive.

Moving on to the small and medium-sized business oriented drives and we find the new Seagate Enterprise NAS HDD. There isn’t the big performance improvement here like there was in the Capacity line, but the new 8TB drives do allow companies to reduce the amount of drives they need and thereby the server sizes as well power consumption. An overall saving on the running costs and less hardware to worry about, that sounds like a good deal.

The Seagate Kinetic HDD series is the most interesting of the new 8TB options, but it is also the one that isn’t for home users at all, at least not yet. The Seagate Kinetic HDDs take a new approach on storage infrastructure as it is based on the Kinetic Open Storage Platform. The open source object storage protocol combined with Ethernet connectivity allows the Kinetic HDD to eliminate multiple layers of legacy hardware and software infrastructure with a simple Key/Value interface. This in return dramatically reduces the need for traditional storage servers. The reduction in equipment, power consumption, and human expenses results in a total cost of ownership saving of up to 70 percent. The LHC in Cern is one of the places where the Kinetic HDDs are being used to store and analyze the many petabytes of data collected.

Intel Projects 100TB+ SSDs by 2019

Intel IDF 2015 is the gift that just keeps on giving. We’re still going through all the information Intel released during the event and now we have a prediction on the future of SSDs. As many of you know, Intel is quite active in the SSD market, with their enterprise and consumer drives. Intel also has a stake in IMFT, a joint venture with Micron to produce NAND. Given this, Intel is projecting that SSDs will be over 30TB by 2018 and surpass 100TB in 2019. Compared to Toshiba’s expectations, these are pretty conservative.

In order to drive demand for such huge drives, Intel is expecting datacentres and the enterprise segment to adopt more and more flash storage. Right now, SSDs are generally only used to cache “hot” data, with the majority of storage still being hard drives. As workloads change, Intel is expecting SSDs to be used more and more as speed and latency become more important and replace hard drives for data storage. Another aspect is that as NVMe gains traction, the reduced overhead and better speeds/latency will further exaggerate the differences between SSDs and HDDs.

With the arrival of 3D Xpoint and faster 3D NAND technologies, it looks like Intel is planning on moving SSDs to both replace some of what DRAM does while also replacing hard drives. With SSDs taking the consumer and enterprise segments by storm, hard disk drive manufacturers should probably hurry with their HAMR developments. Even if SSDs are wildly successful, I don’t see hard drives disappearing just yet as long as they can compete on price. You can find Intel’s full presentation here.

Thecus Release N8900PRO 8-Bay 2U Rackmount NAS

Thecus announced the expansion of its rackmount NAS line-up with the new N8900PRO rack-mounted NAS. The N8900PRO is built around an Intel Xeon E3-1275 quad-core processor with 3.4GHz and comes equipped with 8 GB DDR3 SDRAM. The NAS features 8 SAS and SATA compatible storage bays as well as USB 3.0 and eSATA ports and that should provide plenty of storage opportunities. The NAS also offers an AES-NI hardware encryption engine to provide enterprises with everything the need right out of the box.

The N8900PRO features redundant 500W (or more) power supplies, three Intel 82574L powered RJ45 Gigabit Ethernet ports with seven modes of link aggregation and optionally 10GbE NIC. There are six USB 2.0 and two USB 3.0 ports as well as one eSATA port. The storage is controlled by an LSI 2008 HBA card that supports eight 6Gbit SAS/SATA ports. The LSI RAID controller also brings long the rest of the RAID modes that you wouldn’t find otherwise such as 50 and 60. You don’t get that from the Intel chipset.

Thecus’ N8900PRO is also very scalable through Daisy Chaining technology and iSCSI Thin Provisioning, allowing users to achieve up to 576TB raw storage. The NAS supports all relevant filesystems such as ext3, ext4, Btrfs, and XFS with flexibility over numerous RAID volumes. It’s compatible with VMware, Microsoft, and Citrix virtualization solutions as well as Thecus Heartbeat software that allows two NAS to communicate and ensure that your data is online at all times.

Key Specifications

  • Intel Xeon E3-1275 Quad Core 3.4GHz processor
  • 8 GB DDR3 SDRAM (Expandable to 32 GB)
  • AES-NI hardware encryption engine
  • Dual DOM
  • Redundant power supply
  • 6 x USB 2.0 ports, USB 2 x 3.0 ports
  • 1 x HDMI port
  • SATA III and SAS 6G compatibility
  • Hot-swappable hard drives
  • RAID 0, 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, 60 and JBOD

Toshiba Announces Third Generation of Enterprise SAS SSDs

Toshiba has announced its next generation of enterprise solid state drives designed for applications ranging from email servers, database servers, and virtualized enterprise file servers, to primary storage in read, write or mixed workload environments. The new line is called the PX04S and features high-endurance, mid-endurance, value endurance and read-intensive models optimized for different applications and workloads.

The PX04S line is equipped with dual-port 12Gbps SAS interfaces and it can achieve a sustained random 4K read performance up to 270K, the highest for a 2.5-inch form factor SAS SSD. The write performance has also been improved and the drive can now deliver 125K in that area. This is also Toshiba’s first 12Gbps SAS SSD series able to deliver 3.84TB of operating capacity.

The high-endurance PX04SHB models are targeted at write-intensive virtualized data centers, big data analytics, and high-performance computing that requires the highest levels of eSSD performance, reliability and endurance. The PX04SHB supports 25 complete drive writes per day (DWPD) with a one hundred percent random workload and is available in capacities from 200GB to 1.6TB.

The PX04SMB are the mid-endurance drives that have been optimized for mixed-use in mission-critical hyper-scale and virtualized environments. The drives provide very high levels of predictable performance for optimal system and application performance and support 10 DWPD with capacities of up to 3.2TB.

The PX04SVB value-endurance models are optimized for read-intensive server and storage applications that require a balance of reliability, capacity, and endurance. Capable of three DWPD and with capacities up to 3.84TB, the PX04SVB SSDs are suited for applications such as media streaming and web servers.

Finally, targeted at read-intensive applications requiring one DWPD or less, the PX04SRB delivers features and performance suitable for a range of enterprise and web-based workloads such as video on demand (VOD) and data warehousing. The PX04SRB models are available in capacities up to 3.84TB.

The new drives will, of course, be presented at next week’s Flash Memory Summit in San Jose, California.

Google Glass Might Face Heavy Competition in the Enterprise Market

We haven’t heard much about Google’s Glass Project in a while, but not because it is dying, but more that it is now focusing on the enterprise side of things. Everyone went nuts when Google cancelled the Explorer program earlier this year, thinking that it was the end of Google Glass as well. Fortunately, it wasn’t, but we mere ‘mortals’ won’t be seeing it on the market anytime soon.

Re/Code got word that Google the second edition of Google Glass has been distributed to the Glass at Work enterprise partners. The team is now thinking about how to further improve the wearable and get it at a reasonable price on the market. Rumours are that the next edition of Glass will be well below $1.500, which is not surprising.

Since Google Glass first debuted, the wearable market has been constantly filling with a lot of competition. Google’s main competitors on the market now are ODG, Epson and Vuzix. Even so, Google Glass is still far from perfect. I mean you have Microsoft’s HoloLens for example, which not only displays everything you want right in front of you, but also lets you interact with augmented reality in unimaginable ways.

Looking at the Glass, it has a lot to catch up on. However, this is why Google chose to stick with the enterprise market and is constantly improving it for enterprise AR applications. Google stated that it is “going to take time to get it right”, but will they be able to pull it off in the end? What do you think?

Thank you Re/Code for providing us with this information

SanDisk Plans 6TB and 8TB Enterprise SSDs for 2016

While consumers have just been treated to some of the largest SSDs they’ve been able to buy yet in the Samsung 2TB 850 EVO/Pro, the enterprise segment is already looking beyond that. SanDisk is reportedly planning to launch their data center focused 6TB and 8TB SSDs sometime in 2016. These drives will likely be part of the Optimus Max series targetting 12Gb/s SAS connectors in a 2.5″ form factor. These drives will replace the 4TB models that have just recently launched.

At 6-8TB, SSDs will be closer than ever to matching their spinning disk cousins. HDDs currently top out at around 810TB, a bit over double what most SSDs top out at. While hard drives aren’t likely to stay still, capacity gains have been hard to come by, so 12TB may be where HDDS end up in 2016. An 8TB SDD would finally be able to reach more than 50% capacity of the top hard drives. Given that SSDs are already so much faster than hard drives, it makes sense to target capacity next.

It is important to note that 8TB SSDs are not exactly new. Other firms have demoed high capacity SSDs before, but this marks the first time a company with NAND fabs has reached this point. If SanDisk feels that NAND has reached a state where 8TB SSDs make sense on a large scale, the market and pricing is probably good. Hopefully, consumers will benefit from the advances and maybe some of you can get a 4TB SSD to go with your new Skylake-E/Zen and Pascal/Arctic Islands builds!

Thank you WCCFTech for providing us with this information 

Beam Me Up: Star Trek Communicators Are Now A Thing!

So most people have seen Star Trek, in one form or another the series has helped shaped everything from television to science fiction as a whole. With alien species planning to take over the universe and rogue admirals breaking laws and rules left right and centre the show has helped captivate so many minds and created so many memories. Now you can start living that dream of being a member of the Enterprise with a Star Trek Communicator of your own.

The Wand company are dedicated to making functional copies of props from your favourite shows, and in this case they have really gone beyond the atmosphere with a Star Trek communicator shaped like those found in the original series. Based on 3D scans taken from an original prop, the device is made up of aluminium and die-cast metal with a textured ABS giving it that finished science fiction look.

Priced at roughly £100 the device is not a cheap one, but for those who are interested the device is Bluetooth enabled. This means you can pair it up with your phone or PC and have your calls taken on a star trek communicator, or even play your music through its speakers.

Being a Star Trek fan this is a great step forward, now they just need to create the comm badges from the Next Generation and my dreams will be complete!

Thank you NyDailyNews for the information.

Not Everyone Will Get Windows 10 on the 29th of July

If you were eagerly waiting to get your hands on Windows 10 on the 29th of July, you might be a bit disappointed. Microsoft just ruled out some updates on the upcoming Windows distribution timings, so bear with us on this.

The company said that Windows Insider program members will be the first to get Windows 10 when it launches, with other users who have reserved their copies being notified by email. Once you get notified, you will be able to get on downloading the Windows build. However, the company will be rolling it out in waves, which will increase in size gradually. This means there won’t be a lot of users who reserved Windows 10 getting it when the clock hits zero.

For regular home users, Microsoft will release the notification once it gets enough information from your system and considers it “ready” for Windows 10. Users who do not have a PC fitting Microsoft’s requirement will be notified by the Microsoft team and be given details as well as contact information on what they should do to get the build.

Business users have something else to deal with. Windows 10 Pro businesses will be able to download the build alongside Windows Insider users on the 29th of July, but larger companies have to wait. Windows 10 Enterprise and Education will be available through the company’s Volume Licensing Service Center starting on the 1st of August.

In addition to the above, all Windows 8.1 versions sold from retail stores will be given out with additional information on how to upgrade to Windows 10. More information about what Microsoft has planned for the Windows 10 rollout can be found over at their blog here.

Toshiba Announced its Highest Capacity Enterprise Cloud HDD

Toshiba added a new drive to their already long list of available hard drives and this one is a large capacity drive intended for cloud storage. The Toshiba MC04 family got a new member and will soon be available as a 6TB version too.

Toshiba’s MC04 is a standard 3.5-inch form factor drive that delivers 7200 RPM while it still provides  a large storage capacity. Where most high-capacity drives run at a slower 5400 RPM speed, we’ve recently seen how much of a difference the extra RPM can make in our review section., enabling suitable service levels for high-performance cloud-based applications and storage.

This provides a more cost-effective high-speed storage solution and also has the power to decrease the overall running costs for the companies. The new drive not only provides 20 percent more storage than the previous 5TB model, it also does it at the same power consumption which will lower the overall costs.

It is rated for a workload of 180TB transferred per year and features SATA 2.0 interface speeds and Advanced Format sector. It is also still available as 2TB, 3TB, 4TB and 5TB versions.

“Today’s cloud-based infrastructures require cost-effective, increased storage capacity,” said Martin Larsson, vice president of Toshiba Electronics Europe, Storage Products Division. “With up to 6TB capacity and 7,200RPM performance, the Toshiba MC04 Series delivers an optimized balance of enterprise capacity, workload, and performance required by our customers’ high data growth cloud use-cases.”

The Toshiba MC04 6TB Enterprise Cloud HDD will be sampled to partners starting from August 2015.

SanDisk Flash Drives and SSDs at Computex 2015

Computex 2015 – SanDisk also brought along all their other storage devices such as the impressive 128GB Ultra Fit USB 3.0 drive. This is the world’s smallest high-capacity USB 3.0 drive and it can hold up to 16 hours of Full HD video while not being much bigger than the nail on your thumb. The drive still transfers files at up to 130MB/s, allowing you to transfer a full movie in less than 40 seconds.

The new Z400s SSD was also on display, a perfect balance between performance, capacity, and reliability for replacing your PC’s HDD. It’s build as a cost effective alternative to mechanical HDDs.

If the 128GB capacity from the tiny Ultra Fit drive isn’t enough, then SanDisk also has the 256GB Ultra USB 3.0 drive with up to 256GB capacity.

The SanDisk Extreme 500 is a portable SSD with a capacity up to 480GB that fits right into your pocket while being four times faster than an external HDD. It has a rugged and durable design and it is shock resistant, a perfect combination for when you’re on the go.


SanDisk also had their other drives such as the X300 and X110 in 2.5-inch and small form factor drives with them.

Enterprise users also had their part to look at with the CloudSpeed ECO Gen2 SATA3, Lighting Ultra Gen2 12Gb/s SAS, Optimus MAX 4TB SAS and Fusion ioMemory SX300 PCIe Application Accelerator.