Delphi’s Driverless Car Preparing to Start Its Nationwide Journey

It looks like Delphi is looking to start pushing boundaries today by showing off the true potential of autonomous vehicle technology. The driverless car is set to begin a cross-country trip later today, having the starting point set in California and the destination set as New York. Though driverless cars may be truly advanced, a driver will still be present inside the car to take control in case of emergency.

“Delphi had great success testing its car in California and on the streets of Las Vegas,” said Jeff Owens, chief technology officer of Delphi. “now it’s time to put our vehicle to the ultimate test by broadening the range of driving conditions. This drive will help us collect invaluable data in our quest to deliver the best automotive grade technologies on the market.”

The journey is said to be 3.500 miles and is taking place in order for engineers to collect valuable live data which can further enhance the self-driving car technology. The vehicle is said to be able to accurately navigate a 4-way stop, pass cyclists safely and enter/exit highways on its own.

Thank you TweakTown for providing us with this information

Top Tech Investor Warn US Could be “F—ed” by its Strict Immigration Policy

Paul Graham, co-founder of seed accelerator Y Combinator and investor in Dropbox, gauges that 95% of the world’s best engineers live outside the US, and that America’s strict immigration policy means the country will never be able to enjoy the fruits of their labour. According to Graham, unless there is a major reform of immigration laws to allow talent to enter the country, the US could be “f—ed”.

Graham shared his concerns on his personal blog:

“The more of the world’s great programmers are here, the more the rest will want to come here.

And if we don’t, the US could be seriously f—ed. I realize that’s strong language, but the people dithering about this don’t seem to realize the power of the forces at work here. Technology gives the best programmers huge leverage. The world market in programmers seems to be becoming dramatically more liquid. And since good people like good colleagues, that means the best programmers could collect in just a few hubs. Maybe mostly in one hub.

What if most of the great programmers collected in one hub, and it wasn’t here? That scenario may seem unlikely now, but it won’t be if things change as much in the next 50 years as they did in the last 50.

We have the potential to ensure that the US remains a technology superpower just by letting in a few thousand great programmers a year.”

Source: Business Insider

Samsung Tease Eye-Controlled Mouse

Set to help the disabled use computers with ease, Samsung’s eye-tracking technology will allow users to control their computers functionality without needing to handle a physical mouse.

Developed in-house by Samsung engineers, this technology is an advancement of their EYECAN system, a mouse control device utilized through glasses worn by the user. This updated technology is coined the EYECAN+ and enables you to simply look at where you wish to click and physically blink to activate commands and controls on your system. In their demonstrations, Samsung made sure to point out that you can type and perform ‘drag-and-stop’ commands with their new advancement – meaning you can perform simple tasks and play games such as Angry Birds.

This is reportedly not the first eye-tracking software to hit the market and quoted as not the best. However, Samsung are rumored to be making this a open-source style project, meaning other companies are able to gather and build on this technology, with a lot of the ‘hard yards’ already being completed by the Samsung engineering team.

This means that if it were to make it to the public (which Samsung is not planning to do), we could see this retail for an expected $150 in the local market. Further meaning that any person or carer should be able to purchase this device without too much difficulty, massively increasing their computer using abilities.

Image courtesy of TrustedReviews

Microsoft Launches Security and Threat Information Sharing Platform Named Interflow

Microsoft plans on providing new and more efficient ways for security professionals to effectively and swiftly respond to potential threats. This is why the company has just launched the closed preview of a platform named Interflow, designed with cybersecurity in mind.

The platform is said to have been announced in a Microsoft blog post, having stated that it is a product of collaboration with the Microsoft Active Protections Platform. Interflow is designed to “take industry specifications to create an automated feed of machine-readable threat information that can be shared across industries and groups”. Also, Microsoft has stated that users decide which information or feeds are shared with the communities and even which community is required to be established.

Up until now, Microsoft has been testing the platform internally having its own security teams assessing the threats. However, Microsoft states that the platform is available to other companies as well who desire to test and even participate in improving it. The company has also stated that it plans on making Interflow available to all MAPP groups in the future.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d3CPn-t94gg[/youtube]

In terms of specifications, Microsoft said that Interflow supports a number of open specifications, such as STIX (Structured Threat Information eXpression), TAXII (Trusted Automated eXchange of Indicator Information), as well as CybOX (Cyber Observable eXpression). Given the latter, the platform should integrate with existing systems and avoid potential data locking.

Given that threats and cyber attacks are increasing in number, security is becoming every company’s main priority and being able to respond to cyber attacks at the same time they occur is the best solution in order to have a greater chance of successfully protecting the company network and systems.

Thank you TheNextWeb for providing us with this information
Video courtesy of Microsoft TechNet