Facebook Reactions Replace Your Likes With Even More Emotions

So you are on Facebook and you notice your friend has posted an item about something rather sad, or something which really grinds your gears. You hover your mouse over the like button to show that you sympathise with them but then you stop. How can you “like” something which is sad? Don’t worry, Facebook has now expanded how you can respond to posts.

To add to the tradition Like you can now let them feel the warmth of your heart with “Love” or if it was just a good laugh there is always “Haha”. There is “wow” for those moments that just surprise you, “sad” for the times when you wish you didn’t go on Facebook because of the tears and “Angry” for when things are just that little bit too much.

To access these new reactions, the “like” button has been replaced by, surprise suprise, the “reactions” button. Just select the one you want (or release if you are on a touch screen) and your reaction will be noted. The three most popular reactions will be displayed with each event, and notifications will now state that your friends “reacted” to your posts.

As you can see from the image below from our very own Facebook page, the reactions can easily be accessed and even show their little emoticons.

 

Playing Computer Games With Friends Can Make Your Brains Sync

Scientists have discovered that playing computer games can bring players’ emotional responses and brain activity into “unison“, according to a press release in Daily Science. By measuring the activity of facial muscles and imaging the brain while gaming, the group found out that people go through similar emotions and display matching brainwaves.

“”It’s well known that people who communicate face-to-face will start to imitate each other. People adopt each other’s poses and gestures, much like infectious yawning. What is less known is that the very physiology of interacting people shows a type of mimicry — which we call synchrony or linkage,” explains Michiel Sovijärvi-Spapé.”

In the study, test participants play a computer game called Hedgewars, in which they manage their own team of animated hedgehogs and in turns shoot the opposing team with ballistic artillery. It was noticed that the players teamed up against the computer while they were pinned directly against each other. Both players were measured with fEMG and EEG during this time. It was noticed that the more competitive the game gets, the more in sync the players’ emotional responses are.

“Replicating previous studies, we found linkage in the fEMG: two players showed both similar emotions and similar brainwaves at similar times. We further observed a linkage also in the brainwaves with EEG,” tells Sovijärvi-Spapé.
“Although counterintuitive, the discovered effect increases as a game becomes more competitive. And the more competitive it gets, the more the players’ positive emotions begin to reflect each other. All the while their experiences of negative emotions increase.”

Another interpretation suggested by the group is that the physical linkage of emotion may work to compensate a possibly faltering social bond while competing in a gaming setting.

The research was conducted in collaboration between Helsinki Institute for Information Technology HIIT, Aalto University School of Science, Aalto University School of Business and the University of Helsinki.

Thank you Daily Science for providing us with this information
Image courtesy of Daily Science