Facebook Reactions Replace Your Likes With Even More Emotions

So you are on Facebook and you notice your friend has posted an item about something rather sad, or something which really grinds your gears. You hover your mouse over the like button to show that you sympathise with them but then you stop. How can you “like” something which is sad? Don’t worry, Facebook has now expanded how you can respond to posts.

To add to the tradition Like you can now let them feel the warmth of your heart with “Love” or if it was just a good laugh there is always “Haha”. There is “wow” for those moments that just surprise you, “sad” for the times when you wish you didn’t go on Facebook because of the tears and “Angry” for when things are just that little bit too much.

To access these new reactions, the “like” button has been replaced by, surprise suprise, the “reactions” button. Just select the one you want (or release if you are on a touch screen) and your reaction will be noted. The three most popular reactions will be displayed with each event, and notifications will now state that your friends “reacted” to your posts.

As you can see from the image below from our very own Facebook page, the reactions can easily be accessed and even show their little emoticons.

 

Complaints Rise Concerning Emoticons Racking Up Mobile Bills

The BBC reports today that an increasing number of UK mobile phone users have been complaining about emoticons racking up their bills. They say that money-focused website, MoneySavingExpert has received a significant number of complaints about sky-high bills thanks to emoticons and “other symbols”.

Apparently, a number of people have been caught out unaware that their network may treat the sending of emoticons, symbols and even e-mail addresses, as an MMS rather than a SMS. These messages typically cost significantly more than standard text messages and do not count as part of unlimited texts deals included on some contracts.

While many say that the issue is the fault of networks, O2 told the BBC that customers should be cautious when sending such messages.

“If a customer is using a smartphone to send text messages to more than one person at the same time, they could be charged the cost of sending an MMS. It can also happen when the message contains icons, emoticons and symbols or an email address. 

And some apps (such as Facebook) that integrate with a customer’s contact list in their smartphone may result in an MMS charge too,”

Source: BBC News

Real Life Emoji’s Are Just Plain Scary

Non-profit group Innocence en Danger has created a campaign to highlight the dangers of children talking to strangers online by creating emoji’s using real human faces. The emjoi has long been used as a series of cartoony like images to show off emotions in text messages, instant messaging and skype. The goal of the adverting campaign is to draw attention to the issue of sexual predators who roam online chat services looking to meet children and by using emoji’s gain their trust.

The word emoji is a Japanese creation meaning picture (e) and letter (moji). While emoji’s have been around since the birth of texting and mobile phones, it is the terrible use that they are used for that is the driving force behind this campaign. Innocence en Danger is hoping that by seeing these creepy images parents and children alike will learn that when chatting online to strangers you never know how they are, even if they are using the emoji’s and to be careful because you never know who could be on the other end of the computer/phone.

Hopefully this campaign will take off and get awareness out to the serious issue of online sexual predators preying on children online.

Thank you News.com.au for the information provided 

Images courtesy of Innocene en Danger