Disney Hacks a Smart-Watch and Your Body!

In everyday life, we come into contact with hundreds, if not thousands of items. Some we knowingly touch such as our phones or our computer peripherals, but what about that spoon that we compulsively pick up every time we go into the kitchen, no just me?

Most of the items we touch are insulated, but most give off a small electromagnetic ‘noise’ which our bodies can pick up because we are pretty impressive conductors. Disney has partnered with Carnegie Mellon University and has hacked together a proof-of-concept that can pick up the noise that travels through our bodies in real-time and displays the object on the display. The group calls this innovation “EM-Sense”.

Ars Technica reports the device has been created by essentially hacking a Samsung Galaxy Gear with a host of bulky tech such as a “software-defined radio receiver” to allow the watch to more accurately determine what is being used, with a current accuracy rating of just over 96%.

If you want to try your hand at this yourself, the researchers say that the setup is something “hobbyists can replication” and will cost “under $10” (assuming you already own a Galaxy Gear).

Personally I really like this idea, but this sort of technology could be manipulated and abused. In the future, the information stored could be sold/ used by the device manufacturer to display ad’s for products, or what if the device could be hacked and it knows when you go to an ATM and determine what buttons you press on the keypad for your pin number.

Do you think this technology would be too intrusive? Let us know in the comments.

Individual Wins Disability Grant After Claiming To Be Allergic To Gadgets

Well you learn something new everyday, a French individual has won a payout for being allergic to gadgets, and yes you read right, not gas but gadgets.

Marine Richard, 39, explained to a court that she is allergic to electromagnetic radiation with is emitted from gadgets. As a result, the ruling states that she may claim €800 (£580) per month for three years. After the ruling, Marine stated that it “is a “breakthrough” for people affected by electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS)

This condition has some validity as WHO, what, yes WHO which stands for the World Health Organization, recognises it as a genuine condition, although as yet the causes are still unclear. As a result, Ms Richard has resorted to living in the mountains of south-west France – in a barn that has no electricity.

The symptoms sound quite severe considering a sufferer is likely to encounter headaches, fatigue, nausea and palpitations. I do feel this is a genuine condition but wonder how you would counteract it, after all, it is pretty impossible to escape these gadgets which include phones, Televisions and even Microwaves which emit electromagnetic waves. I do feel further research is needed to better conclude the health implications of certain devices.

It is a difficult one, if you’re a sufferer and it is recognised then it is not very pleasant, but, is it right to receive £580 pounds a month and call it a disability? Only time will tell.

Thank you bbc for providing us with this information

Image courtesy of mytechportal

US Navy Testing Electromagnetic Catapults to Help Launch Aircraft from Carriers

Aircraft carriers have been equipped with steam-powered catapults from the very start in order to help launch fighters and bombers and get them airborne quick. However, this old-fashioned technology seems to be a bit too old for the Navy to use it on newer multi-million aircraft.

As an alternative, the US Navy is now looking to replace its technology with an Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS). The technology is currently being tested aboard the USS Gerald R. Ford and uses bursts of electromagnetic energy to launch planes much more smoothly and efficiently compared to the steam catapults.

While aircraft carriers are one of the biggest ships found on the sea, they are still not big enough for aircraft to generate enough lift before they reach the end of the ship. This is why they required some auxiliary help, such as the steam catapults, to generate that extra lift force to get them into the air.

However, steam catapults come with some drawbacks. The old technology is said to take up a lot of space and weigh in at 1,300 lbs. The systems are said to take a long time to recharge and after each launch, the launch itself is said to be abrupt. This means that there is no smooth acceleration for a steam piston, putting a lot of wear on the aircraft each time it launches.

Steam catapults are also said to use more power than the EMALS system, which is rather surprising. The switch to EMALS is said to bring smoother acceleration, improved reliability and a more efficient design.

Thank you Geek for providing us with this information