Furious 7 Smashes Hollywood Records

The original The Fast and the Furious movie was a surprise hit, bringing in $144 million domestically and $207 million worldwide on a budget of $38 million. However, the franchise seems to have reeled in a lot more than previously anticipated. The latest title in the Fast and Furious series, Furious 7, brought in $143 million domestically on its opening weekend and a further $240 million in foreign markets, further adding to its $383 million total.

The box office takings made the movie the largest opening for any film in April, the largest for the franchise and even the ninth largest film opening in history. However, there is more profit to come, as Box Office Mojo reports.

“That’s without any help from China, Japan and Russia, where it will open in the next few weeks,” Box Office Mojo reported. “So far, Furious 7 has earned $384 million worldwide, and is very likely on track to earn over $1 billion by the end of its run.”

“The movie’s success was driven by minority audiences: 25% of the weekend’s ticket buyers were white, 37% were Hispanic, 24% were African American, and 10% were Asian,” CNN Money stated. “44% of the film’s moviegoers were also under the age of 25.”

There is no doubt that the movie has been extremely successful, but it remains to be seen just how successful it can get by the end of the year. Are you going to the cinema to watch Furious 7?

Thank you Polygon for providing us with this information.

Samsung Losing its Lead in China Smartphone Market

Thanks to Chinese website t.qianzhan, we’ve learned that the kings Samsung are almost being dethroned. Since opening up their sales in China back in 2002, Samsung smart phone market share has seen a significant decline in recent years. Currently sitting at 13.5% of the market share, Chinese-Domestic brand Millet has almost caught up with a rating of 10.8% and Lenovo is close on it’s heels with 10.7%.

We’ve been reporting of the Chinese smart phone market being in some hot water. Sony’s sales have drastically plummeted and the Chinese public have shown that they are starting to lean towards the cheaper domestic made offerings, rather than shelling out the money for the big company offerings. As according to China’s mobile phone market quality monitoring report 2014, here’s what the second quarter of phone sales looked like:

  • Samsung 13.5% (Dropping from 15.4% in Q1)
  • Millet 10.8%
  • Lenovo 10.7%
  • Huawei 8.3%
  • Apple 6.9%

Although Samsung is still sitting at the top, they’re on a steady decline – dropping 1.9% from Q1 to Q2 alone. Samsung’s original market dominance is said to be due to their wide range of phone offerings – trying to supply many different models suitable for consumers of various pay grades and needs. However, this adds a premium cost to their whole product line, especially when they’re the number two spender in the world for research and development, as we reported yesterday.

Apparently their constant release of copious smartphone models has been causing a large amount of friction in local Samsung offices, constantly trying to compete with Chinese-Domestic brands like Millet but being frustratingly unable to do so due to the locals low-overhead and domestic dominance. We will continue to report on the seemingly-broken Chinese smart phone market as the story develops.

Image courtesy of TechMac

Android 5.0 is Basically Useless in China

Android 5.0 has been released to a massive reception in Western nations, promising and delivering a handy new user interface amongst other spectacular features.

Unfortunately for the Chinese population, almost all of this will go unused. Due to some reported issues ‘left over by history’, most domestic acquired Android users will be using non-native Android operating systems. Most Chinese-domestic phones are running a customized third-party ROM, including offerings such as HTC’s Sense, the Millet Miui and Meizu’s Flyme amongst many other handhelds.

You can’t help but feel sorry for them, given the positive reports that have been coming out of Android 5.0 thus far. Since the birth of Android, it is according to some that the Android 5.0 update is the first time that they finally ‘get it’, offering an innovative, stylish and simple interface design that’s obviously meant to compete with and crush iOS’ offering. Alongside this, these limitations aren’t just set to their mobile phones – Lollipop extends over Android OS run tablets, TV’s and wearable technology. Meaning that some of their products will be running the fancy updated OS, alongside their ‘basic’ looking third-party phone interface.

It’s unfortunate that China shall have to miss out on such software advancements, but it’s obvious that they’ve got the hardware game down pat. We’ve recently reported of their domestic-made offerings selling through the roof, despite update news such as this. So maybe it’s becoming clear that price wins over all and they don’t care about a fancy UI. Alongside Chinese-domestic phone company selling a reported 1.62 million of their phones in a non-stop 72 hour period, we’ve also reported that many ‘big wig’ phone companies are experiencing a significant decline in sales.

Image courtesy of Chiphell

Sony Mobile China in Turmoil

Recent times have seen Sony’s Chinese Mobile branch go through a large amount of employee lay-offs and follow a similar suit to Samsung in losing ground to Chinese-based companies.

This news doesn’t come as a large shock, we’ve reported recently of Chinese-domestic brands like Millet selling 1.62 million phones over a non-stop 72 hour period, alongside news of the whole Chinese Mobile market being in a significant decline.

The main issue that these companies are facing is said to be due to their ‘premium’ pricing, as is seen through most big business offerings (see: Apple). The public are now seemingly refusing to spend the extra few hundred dollars to buy the big-brand’s latest tech, choosing to go for the much cheaper domestic option instead. As according to Chinese-based website MyDrivers however, this is largely Sony’s fault – claiming that these external competitors only helped accelerate their decline.

Alongside issues with their tight marketing budget, Sony is said to be going about pushing their phones in the wrong way. We’ve seen reports that Sony phone counters have disappeared in many main Chinese cities, they’ve been also expressing a lack of appreciation for the social media market and providing a lesser product mobile to their competitors. Sony have been said to believe their products will ‘sell themselves’ which, given the information you’re currently reading, is not true- they’re not Apple.

MyDrivers has also claimed that the local service for Sony’s tech offerings was poorly handled. Free applications given to Western consumers are often blocked by the high-security Chinese government, making the ‘premium’ purchase price for an Xperia Z mean that much less. Alongside this, there has been reports of major internal fighting within the Chinese company branch – all of this amounting for a poor sales showing year on year.

One other major issue that was pointed out is the pricing issues that Sony experienced with their Xperia Z. Being released at 4,999 yuan ($815 US), Sony decided to cut their price majorly after just one month down to 4,299 yuan ($700 US) and a further drop to 3699 yuan ($600 US) was seen just 30 days later. The issue here is that it cheapens Sony’s image – Can you imagine how mad you would be, purchasing a product on release for $815 US, only for it to be retailing for $200 US less in just 60 days time?

Sony is not giving up the fight for the Chinese market, we will report as the story develops.

Image courtesy of Chiphell