AOC Launches U2477PWQ 23.6″ 4K 60Hz Monitor

UHD 4K resolution has made its entry all the way down to smartphones and tablets, but most desktop monitors are still quite large and maybe not the best suitable solution for tight office spaces. That doesn’t mean that you don’t want the extra clarity and resolution that a 4K panel can provide and for that AOC launched the compact 23.6-inch U2477PWQ monitor sporting HDMI 2.0 and 60Hz at a 3840 x 2160 resolution.

The PLS panel delivers a good colour uniformity at any viewing angle (178/178 degrees) and exploits 100% of the sRGB colour gamut. A 4ms response time might not be the fastest, but anything below 5ms should be usable for gaming too.

The AOC U2477PWQ comes with DisplayPort 1.2, HDMI 2.0, DVI and VGA for connectivity to pretty much any device. If your smart devices are compatible, then the MHL allows you to both display content from a smartphone or tablet directly on the monitor while charging it at the same time. The flicker-free technology should also help reduce eye stress while using the monitor, something everyone can appreciate that has worked at a monitor for longer periods of time.

The included and pretty stylish stand allows for a pivot, but not swivel. You can tilt it -5 to plus 23 degrees and adjust the height with up to 130mm. Should this not be sufficient, then you can mount it on a 100×100 VESA compatible arm or stand.

The AOC U2477PWQ will be available in November 2015. The MSRP will be £289. As with all of its displays, AOC offers a 3-year warranty with on-site exchange service.

R9 Fury Perfect for the Living Room? Possibly Not!

In a move that might snatch defeat from the jaws of victory, information has been revealed that the new R9 Fury GPU will not support HDMI 2.0 nor DP 1.3. This comes from a forum post on Overclockers.co.uk by what appears to be an AMD representative. Asked to confirm if the card would support HDMI 2.0, this was the answer given by AMDMatt:

If this post is accurate, the Fury will not only not be supporting HDMI 2.0. HDMI 2.0 is critical as the industry moves to 4K, something AMD has been pushing heavily. HDMI 2.0 allows for 4K @60Hz, something currently impossible with HDMI 1.4. DisplayPort 1.3, also not supported enables 2 4K @60Hz screens to be driven or 5K and 8K in certain modes at 60Hz. Both are also required for HDCP 2.2 which allows BluRay 4K discs to play with copyright protection. While DisplayPort 1.2a does allow for 4K@60Hz, users with HDMI 4K TVs, which have become quite prevalent, will be left at a console level 30Hz. Fury Nano, if also similarly handicapped will have it’s HTPC ambitions hurt as well.

For now, there is no need to get riled up just yet. This is just one post so far and AMDMatt might be misinformed. It will be best to save any pitchforks till official word comes out from AMD on their HDMI and DP support. The flexibility of DP also means that an active adapter can convert the DP 1.2a signal to HDMI 2.0, but HDCP 2.2 will be lost. If this report is true though, it makes AMD’s other mistakes this time seem trivial. Missing one of HDMI 2.0 or DP 1.3 is serious enough I tend to believe that one of the two is supported until I get official confirmation from AMD. Either way, AMD best act fast before the internet rumour mill goes out of control.

If you were hoping for high frame rates on your new 4KTV for living room gaming, HDMI 2.0 is vital.

EVGA Introduced the GeForce GTX 960 SuperSC ACX 2.0+

Nvidia has released the GeForce GTX 960 and the graphics card manufacturers are getting their new cards ready. EVGA is one of them, and they have announced the new EVGA GeForce GTX 960 SuperSC ACX 2.0+ graphics card.

The new EVGA ACX 2.0+ cooler brings new features as well. A Memory MOSFET Cooling Plate (MMCP) reduces MOSFET temperatures up to 11°C, and optimized Straight Heat Pipes (SHP) reduce GPU temperature by an additional 5°C. ACX 2.0+ coolers also feature optimized Swept fan blades, double ball bearings, and an extreme low power motor.

New Features:

  • dBi (dB Noise Inverter) – EVGA’s ACX 2.0+ fan turns off below 60C, generating 0dB of noise.
  • MMCP (Memory MOSFET Cooling Plate) – Full-size cooling plate makes direct contact with memory and MOSFETS, reducing memory up to 9°C and MOSFET up to 11°C.
  • QSD (Quick Switch Dual BIOS) – Multiple integrated BIOSes allow you to switch to the secondary with the flick of a switch.
  • OPT (Optimized Power Target) – The power target is precisely tuned for the perfect balance of thermal, power and performance, offering 33% more power over reference.
  • SHP (Straight Heat Pipes) – Triple 8mm straight heat pipes offer 6% better heat dissipation than bent heat pipes with reduced thermal resistance.

The EVGA GeForce GTX 960 SuperSC ACX 2.0+ GPU has 1024 CUDA Cores and 2GB GDDR5 memory, the GPU runs at 1279 MHz with a boost up to 1342MHz while the memory is running at 7010MHz. The card provides three DisplayPort 1.2, one HDMI 2.0, and one Dual-link DVI port. It also comes with the convenient quick-switch dual BIOS.

Thanks to EVGA for providing us with this information

Shuttle Released XH97V Barebone Mini-PC with 4k Support

The European subsidiary of Shuttle has released their latest and most powerful Mini-PC Barebone system, the Shuttle XH97V. Powered by the Intel H97 chipset and the LGA1150 socket for fourth and fifth generation Intel Core processors and having a volume of just 3.5 liters, make these new Barebones great for a multitude of scenarios.

Just because something is small, doesn’t mean that it can’t pack a punch. Shuttle is a master in this area and they’ve packed this tiny 240 x 200 x 72 mm slim X-type chassis with basic features and expansion options to meet both 4K media presentations, as well as office productivity. This is also the first Shuttle mini-PC barebone to support simultaneous use of up to three displays out of the box.

The front ports are hidden behind moveable panels to offer a better dust protection as well as giving the unit a cleaner look. Opening up the panels expose the two USB 3.0 and two USB 2.0 ports, and there’s also two 3.5mm audio jacks for headphones and microphone. It has room for an optical disk drive (ODD) with a max height of 12.7mm, seen at the top of the photo.

Users who don’t need an optical drive can use the bay for an additional 2.5-inch drive. Speaking of 2.5-inch drives, the Shuttle XH97V can hold a 12.7 mm  and a 9.5mm drive beside the optional one in the ODD tray allowing you to install up to three SATA3 2.5-inch drives in this tiny unit.

The rear of the Barebone offers just as much connectivity as the front with two USB 3.0 and two USB 2.0 ports. Shuttle also added an eSATA2 and an RJ45 Gigabit Ethernet port. The Ethernet is powered by the Realtek 8111G Ethernet controller. The three 3.5mm jacks for the 5.1 surround sound are run by the Realtek ALC 662 HD Audio Codec.

There are two DisplayPort 1.2 and one HDMI 1.4 ports for up to three simultaneous display connections. The DisplayPorts can display 4k content in 60Hz while the HDMI port does it at half the refresh rate; 30Hz.

There is also a COM port, clear CMOS button and a DC IN for the power brick. The Kensington-style lock is cleverly placed to pass through both parts of the chassis, allowing Shuttle to use thumbscrews for the chassis and still being intrusion safe.

The motherboard inside is a standard mITX form-factor and it can handle up to 16GB memory over the two SO-DIMM slots. The maximum memory speed will depend on what CPU you use. The H97 chipset and LGA1150 (H3) socket gives you a wide variety of options from Core i3 / i5 / i7 processors as well as Pentium and Celeron models with a max TDP of 65W.

The XH97V doesn’t stop there and offers another two mini PCI Express expansion slots, one half-sized and one full-sized. The half-sized supports PCIe 2.0 and USB 2.0 and is intended for use with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth cards. The full-sized also supports SATA3 and can be used for mSATA drives as well.

Shuttle only used solid capacitors in this system and the processor cooling uses an integrated heat-pipe system with two 60mm fans. It also has an Always-On jumper that when set will make the system automatically boot after power loss.

The new Shuttle Barebone XH97V is available at retailers across Europe now or very soon and it has an MSRP €193,00 exclusive VAT. At some retailers, it’s already down to €186.47 inclusive VAT before it even has arrived in their storage.

Thanks to Shuttle for providing us with this information

Images and video courtesy of Shuttle

 

Nvidia 340.43 Driver Allows HDMI 1.4 To Output 60Hz 4K UHD

The HDMI specifications essentially limit the output of UHD (3840 x 2160) to 30Hz and 4K (4096 x 2160) to 24Hz. DisplayPort outputs are required to reach 60Hz at those resolutions or the use of dual HDMI ports. Over at Anandtech they have discovered that the dual HDMI requirement isn’t set in stone. Some users found out that using the 340.43 Nvidia drivers with Kepler based video cards allows UHD displays to be powered at 60Hz over a single HDMI. However, the new workaround is not present on all UHD displays, only some have implemented it. The workaround method effectively reduces the bandwidth required by the UHD 4K 60Hz stream by using chroma subsampling which effectively lowers the image quality and amount of chroma colour data. This frees up enough bandwidth to jump from 30 to 60Hz while maintaining a UHD resolution.

4:2:0 chroma sampling is only available on a handful of UHD 4K TVs currently on the market but Nvidia has confirmed their Kepler cards do support it. The UHD 60Hz signal is only really good for video output though, if you were hoping to use a 4:2:0 compatible UHD TV as a desktop monitor you will be disappointed. Currently, the 4:2:0 workaround is a cheap way of getting 60Hz UHD video but for a true UHD 60Hz image without quality loss Displayport 1.2 is the only way to achieve that until HDMI 2.0 UHD displays and TVs hit the market.

Source: Anandtech

Image courtesy of Expreview

Dell Announces Three New 4K UltraHD Displays

Dell has launched two of its new displays, a 24-inch 4K UltraHD display boasting a resolution of 3840 x 2160 and 32-inch 4K UltraHD display having the same resolution as the latter. Dell has also announced the launch of another 28-inch 4K display but users will have to wait for this particular display until 2014.

While all three displays have the same 3840 x 2160 resolution, the pixel densities is not, ranging from a reasonable 140 PPI for the 32-inch model to a 157 PPI for the upcoming 28-inch model and an even higher 185 PPI for the 24-inch model.

Both the 24-inch and 32-inch displays support refresh rates of 60 Hz over DisplayPort 1.2 and 30 Hz over HDMI, as well as a variety of ports including HDMI, DisplayPort, Mini DisplayPort, four USB 3.0 ports, and a media card reader. Both displays also offer height, tilt, and swivel adjustments.

Exact details on the upcoming 28-inch model have yet to be released, but Dell says that it will offer “the same incredible Ultra HD screen performance” as the other members of the 4K display family and will carry multiple input ports for flexible connectivity.

Dell’s new 4K displays arrive just as speculation regarding a potential 4K display from Apple has escalated ahead of the new Mac Pro launch later this month. Apple claims that the new Mac Pro is being able to drive up to three 4K displays, but the company has not made any announcements about its display plans. The recent introduction of new 4K display panels from AU Optronics fueled speculation that Apple could be nearing an introduction for new displays, but Dell’s displays may be the strongest hint yet that Apple may have something in the works given the two companies have typically used the same panel suppliers for their displays.

In terms of price, the 24-inch display has a price tag of $1399, the 32-inch model is priced at $3499 and the upcoming 28-inch monitor is supposedly being released along with a $1000 tag.

Thank you Macrumors for providing us with this information
Images courtesy of Macrumors and Dell

Intel’s Announces 2014 Thunderbolt Controller Specs

It looks like Intel is continuing on its mission to establish Thunderbolt as the next universal device interconnect standard, despite steep competition from the 5 Gb/s USB 3.0, the upcoming 10 Gb/s USB 3.1, and stringent validation and licensing barriers on its own end. The company outlined its mainstream Thunderbolt controller, which it plans to launch some time in 2014. The company is planning two major introductions to the standard, to help it compete against USB – power delivery, and ad-hoc (peer-to-peer) networking.

The controller named Broadwell Thunderbolt-LP handles a 20 Gb/s Thunderbolt link by aggregating two 10 Gb/s channels, relays DisplayPort 1.2 from the system’s graphics device, and connects to the rest of the system over PCIe 2.0 x2. The chip is built in the 8 x 8 mm package, and features operational and idle TDP ratings of 1.5W and 1mW, respectively. The changes Intel is making to the standard will enable power delivery of up to 53W over a standard tethered cable.

The other big feature is ad-hoc networking, which enables people to set up peer-to-peer 20 Gb/s connections between two PCs much in the same way they did with USB and RS232, back in the day. While it’s no Ethernet replacement, it could prove useful in certain environments, such as content-creation. Intel is expected to make some Thunderbolt-related announcements at CES, next January.

Thank you TechPowerUp for providing us with this information
Images courtesy of TechPowerUp