AMD Reveals Updated FreeSync Technology @ CES 2016

CES 2016: AMD’s FreeSync technology synchronizes a graphics card performance with your monitor’s refresh rate to eliminate screen tearing and create a smooth, fluid experience. Unlike NVIDIA’s solution, there’s no need for a proprietary module which reduces cost and makes monitor manufacturers more likely to adopt FreeSync. Up to now, FreeSync has relied on DisplayPort 1.2a to support refresh rates between 9–240 Hz. Although, to be fair, NVIDIA G-Sync panels also require the use of a DisplayPort connection.

After conducting comprehensive research, AMD discovered that the majority of users still use HDMI 1.4 or HDMI 2.0. As a result, the company decided to focus their efforts on bringing FreeSync to HDMI 1.4a with some custom modifications. Theoretically, this means the next version of HDMI could easily support FreeSync by default.

AMD also unveiled their first FreeSync powered laptop which is a big milestone for the company. The 15.6-inch Lenovo Y700 features a Radeon R9 M380 graphics chip and a quad-core AMD FX-F8800P “Carrizo” APU for $899.

Colorful Announces Their iGame GeForce GTX 960 KUDAN Mini-ITX Graphics Card

Colorful has revealed their iGame GeForce GTX 960 KUDAN Mini-ITX graphics solution, featuring a custom PCB design and factory overclock frequencies.

The GeForce GTX 960 KUDAN is said to be one of the very few Mini-ITX designs with a GM206 chip, making it very popular in the $200 range market. The graphics solution is said to have a low-wattage percentage and provide great 1080p performance.

In terms of specs, the graphics card comes with 1024 CUDA cores, 64 texture mapping units, 32 raster operation units and a 2 GB GDDR5 VRAM with a 128-bit memory interface. While the memory is clocked at 7010 MHz, the GPU clock comes in two blocks.

The factory overclocked specs that come with the card are set at 1127 MHz base and 1178 MHz boost, but a second OC BIOS is said to be available that can ramp up the card to 1152 MHz and 1216 MHz respectively at the push of the button.

Looking at the aesthetics of the card, we see that it features the same design as the iGame GeForce GTX 980 KUDAN, only a bit smaller. It boasts only one fan, but given its low-budget design, it is enough to keep the Mini-ITX card cool.

Power is said to be provided via a 6-pin connector, having the card coming with a 120W TDP. There is also a single SLI connector present on the card and comes with a single DVI, HDMI and three DisplayPort connectors.

Colorful has already listed the card on its website, but details regarding its availability and pricing have yet to be made available.

Thank you WCCF for providing us with this information

Nvidia Shuts Down Rumours About Adaptive Sync Support

There have been rumours going around the internet the last couple of days, that the new Nvidia GeForce GTX 980 and 970 might support Adaptive Sync. Those rumours have been shut finally down after the Chinese technology page Expreview reached out to Nvidia for a comment. Nvidia made it clear in their reply that they want to focus on their own G-sync. This isn’t very surprising, especially with the long range of compatible monitors hitting the market from Acer, Asus, AOC and other companies.

The Adaptive Sync is a royalty free and open standard developed by the Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA) and supported by AMD. The technology does about the same as Nvidia’s own G-Sync, but without any additional hardware. Both technologies let the GPU and monitor keep the display refresh rate in sync with the GPU frame-rates. The end-result is a more fluent picture and an overall smoother result.

The rumour itself should never really have started, but once something like this takes off, it gets around. The two new Nvidia GeForce cards in question only have a DisplayPort 1.2 according to their specifications, and DisplayPort 1.2a is needed for the Adaptive Sync technology. AMD’s current R7 and R9 Radeon cards all feature the DisplayPort 1.2a and thereby already support the Adaptive Sync technology.

This might have been a very deliberate move from Nvidia to boost their own technology. When we look at the new cards, they have the newest of technology everywhere, including the HDMI 2.0 port. Using an older DisplayPort version effectively forces owners of the cards to use Nvidia’s own G-Sync technology, if they want their frame-rate synced.

I honestly have to say, I haven’t seen the two technologies side by side. So I can’t say if one is better than the other. I have however seen both demonstrated separate next to a non-synced setup, and there is a distinct difference.

Update:

After having received some comments on this article, I’d like to clarify it a bit more.  AMD FreeSync, that is part of the new VESA Adaptive Sync standard, is still a prototype system. There aren’t any actual products for it yet.

The base and support for it is there in the DisplayPort 1.2a on the graphics cards, but it requires the monitors to support it too, thus FreeSync isn’t an actual product yet. FreeSync has been demoed and it will come, but G-Sync is here today.

Thank you Expreview for providing us with this information

Image courtesy of Nvidia

 

 

Another G-SYNC Monitor Is Released – AOC 24 inch 144Hz g2460Pg

Monitors with G-SYNC support have been few and far between since Nvidia announced the technology late last year. Since the launch we have seen few monitors with G-SYNC come to market, all made by ASUS as far as I can recall, but no one else has been in on the action.

Today that changes as AOC have revealed their first G-SYNC monitor – the g2460Pg. This is a 24 inch TN panel based monitor with a 144Hz refresh rate, 1ms response time, DisplayPort output and support for G-SYNC. The resolution is just your run of the mill 1920 x 1080 but the main selling point is the ultra high refresh rate paired up with G-SYNC. The displays offers up a brightness of 350 cd/cm and comes with a 3 year warranty. AOC have also equipped a USB 3.0 hub on the monitor which they claim is designed to reduce cable clutter on your desk area.

AOC’s g2460Pg comes with an MSRP of £369.99 including VAT and is available as of next month. The item can currently be pre-ordered from Overclockers UK for £359.99, the expected ETA is July 4th.

Source: AOC PR

Image courtesy of AOC

Phillips MMD Announces the 28″ 4K Ultra HD Display Featuring Over 1 Billion Colours

For those who are unaware, MMD (Multimedia Displays) is a company of TPV established in 2009 through a brand license agreement with Philips, and its role is to exclusively market and sell Philips branded LCD monitors and displays worldwide. Having said that, the company has just announced the latest Phillips 4K Ultra HD display, bearing the 288P6LJEB model number, which is said to deliver unbelievable detail and colour in the sharpest and most brilliant picture ever seen.

The Phillips 4K Ultra HD display is said to have a 4K resolution of up to 3840 x 2160 pixels, which should pack four times the pixel density compared to the traditional Full HD. Coming with a 28-inch display, users are also said to be able to spread out more and thanks to the high number of pixels, texts and images deliver extra brilliance, clarity and a more true-to-life picture.

The 28″ 4K UHD monitor is stated to be suitable in homes as well as business. Normal home users are said to benefit from upcoming 4K TV streaming, as well as view their UHD pictures and videos perfectly and clearly on the Phillips solution at hand. Looking at the business sector, the 4K UHD can help with large text documents as well as complex spreadsheets thanks to its crystal clear image and big 28″ diagonal, making work with the latter more easy and enjoyable.

It is said that the Phillips 4K Ultra HD display is one of the fastest 4K displays on the market thanks to the 1 ms response time, as well as it being calibrated to support over 1 billion colours, having it be able to reproduce the finest colours with total accuracy. Gamers can also benefit from the response time, having the Phillips display boasting the company’s overdrive technology, which is able to automatically adjust the response time to suit the application’s needs.

MultiView is another technology added to the Phillips 4K Ultra HD display solution, giving users the ability to split two sets of content and place them in parallel. Users can for example connect a notebook to the display and display the content on half of the screen, while streaming video content on the other half.

In terms of connectivity, the Phillips 4K Ultra HD display comes with one Display Port 1.2 digital PC-to-Desktop with a speed of up to 10.8 Gbps, a MHL-enabled HDMI port, a DVI-D and a VGA port, while also offering data connectivity support with the help of its two USB 2.0 and two USB 3.0 ports.

Other features included consist of the Smart ErgoBase, enabling the display to be lowered almost to desk level for a comfortable viewing angle, having the low bezel-to-table height able to deliver a perfect viewing experience for users who use bifocals, trifocals or progressive lens glasses for screen work.

The new Phillips 288P6LJEB 4K Ultra HD display is said to become available this summer, having a recommended retail price tag of £599 including VAT.

AOC Reveals First Affordable High-End 4K Resolution 28″ Display In London

The display industry has been cooking up new ways to improve our visual experience for some time now, from 3D features to Virtual Reality gear which isn’t quite ready just yet. However, the latter is not always useful in all areas, therefore the focus has been shifted to 4K technology it seems.

Whether designing, gaming or entertainment activities is in order, 4K technology will always do the trick. This might have sounded appealing to most in the past, but actually acquiring one meant selling an arm and a leg, since the prices were well into the thousands and even more in some cases. No, the price has drastically dropped to around £600 or less for most 4K displays which also meant a drop in specs, but not for AOC and their new 28″ display it seems.

AOC has revealed this first affordable gaming high-spec 28″ display, the U2868Pqu, at the PC Retail Bootcamp event in London. It features a 1ms response timing, which means users do not have to worry about ghosting problems at all, a 300 cd/m brightness rate for high contrast and a 60 Hz refresh rate. These features can be found on its 3840 x 2160 pixels resolution, making it a must-have item when it comes to enthusiastic gamers or even designers.

In terms of connectivity, the U2868Pqu comes with Dual-Link DVI, HDMI and Display Port support, having additional built-in speakers. However, gaming enthusiast will not be quite fond of the speakers, but nonetheless it comes as an additional support when in need of an output device.

In terms of a specific price, Amazon.co.uk has listed the display at a price of £537.60, giving it a release date set for the 1st of June.

Thank you KitGuru for providing us with this information
Images courtesy of KitGuru

No Need For G-Sync Now That Display Port Has Adaptive-Sync

Have you been annoyed at the lack of widespread support for Nvidia G-Sync? It’s one of the coolest technology innovations to happen to PC gaming in years, and it’s reach was limited due to it being sold exclusively via high-end Asus monitors. Well fear no more as you anger will soon be gone. VESA has revealed that they’re adding Adaptive-Sync to its popular DisplayPort 1.2a video interface standard. This means that those who use this connection will be able to enjoy smoother, tear-free images for gaming, judder free video playback and reduced power consumption thanks to low frame rate capabilities on static content, hurray!

With your monitor refreshing at a fixed frame rate, you need to use V-Sync and more GPU power to try to lock the frame rate at the same refresh rate as the monitor, let’s say 60FPS. When your GPU chugs and your frame rate drops, you see screen tear, or you end up working your GPU harder to meet the frame rate demands when it simply doesn’t need to. Having Adaptive-Sync will allow your monitor and GPU to work in harmony, allowing the display to dynamically match the GPU rendering rate on a frame-by-frame basis. This means your GPU can drop in FPS, but you won’t get screen tear and you won’t need V-Sync enabled.

“VESA is constantly evaluating new methods and technologies that add value to both the end-user and our OEM member companies. Adaptive-Sync delivers clearly visible advantages to the user for gaming and live video, and contributes to the development of sleeker mobile system designs by reducing battery power requirements,” said Bill Lempesis, VESA Executive Director. “VESA has developed a test specification to certify Adaptive-Sync compliance. Systems that pass Adaptive-Sync compliance testing will be allowed to feature the official Adaptive-Sync logo on their packaging, informing consumers which DisplayPort-certified displays and video sources offer Adaptive-Sync.”

The new DispalyPort Adaptive-Sync will be offered to VESA members without any license fee, expect to see products supporting the new feature hitting the market in the near future.

Thank you TechPowerUp for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of Gadgets and Stuff.

3rd Gen Intel Thunderbolt Leaked, Supports 40Gb’s Transfers

A new leak has surfaced, giving details from the upcoming Intel 3rd generation Thunderbolt technology, suggesting it will offer up the fastest ever speeds from the technology, a staggering 40Gb per second! This makes the new standard twice as fast as the current Thunderbolt 2 technology and as you can see from the leaked PR image above, it’s also backed up by system charging of up to 100w, increased bandwidth, lower Z-height and backwards compatibility.

The new bandwidth capabilities are courtesy of the PCIe 3 support, offering up double the maximum data transfer speeds while also giving us a 50% reduction in power consumption courtesy of the new hardware.

The real world numbers are likely to be a little lower than this of course, we often see early performance figures to be very favourable in terms of benchmarks, as we suspect Intel will have given the “optimum” scenario to favour their technology for this number, but regardless of that fact, it will be fast, more energy efficient and should pave the way from some interesting new uses for the technology. Being able to run two 4K displays with fast data rates and system charging from a single cable is nothing to sneer at, now all we have to do is sit and wait for it to hit the market next year.

Thank you TweakTown for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of TweakTown.

Latest Club 3D SenseVision MST Hub Technology On Display At CeBIT 2014

Here we are once again at the wonderful Club 3D booth at CeBIT 2014, we’ve already brought you coverage of their superb Poker Series ’14 graphics cards and now we’ll be taking a look at their new SenseVision ranges.

Sense Vision comes in the form of Club 3D’s Multi Stream Transport (MST) Hubs and allows you to stream video to multiple displays via a single Display Port connection. We actually reviewed one of their most recent models a few months ago and you can read that detailed review right here.

The new hubs as well as some prototype ones that we take a closer look at in the video below allow you to expand your desktop with relative ease, outputting video, audio, USB power and more from a single Display Port. This can be from your compatible graphics card or from any other compatible device such as the Microsoft Surface Pro 2, which can its self power up to three external displays, allowing you access to a highly versatile desktop environment without the need for a full system.

Below Club 3D talk us through their latest MST Hub products that will be hitting the market in 2014, enjoy the video and stay tuned for more coverage from both Club 3D as the rest of CeBIT 2014.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fapmW0yZPjk&feature=share&list=UUb9tDXXfM-REtXni2MOpwgA[/youtube]

VESA Working On micro-DisplayPort, To Bring 4K And Beyond Resolution

The Thunderbolt, Thunderbolt 2, DisplayPort and miniDisplayPort are on the market but it looks like the Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA) has just announced that it is working on defining a micro-DisplayPort standard which will still be backward-compatible with existing DisplayPort and mini-DisplayPort devices and offer beyond 4K Ultra HD connectivity for phones, tablets, and ultra-portables.

VESA won’t solely concentrate on the port itself. Instead, it will be figuring out the final design for the docking connector, receptacle, and cable as well. The new standard is “designed to support data rates for future display bandwidths beyond today’s 4K resolutions” as VESA states, while another goal is to support passive cables up to 1.5m ( 5 feet ) in length, without requiring any sort of repeater or other active component, tech which would be particularly important in smartphones and other portable devices.

The micro-DisplayPort will also allow laptop, tablet and smartphone manufacturers to make even thinner devices. That said, it remains to be seen how Apple and Intel will respond to the smaller connection. Currently, the Thunderbolt technology used on the Mac line-up, with a full six Thunderbolt 2 ports, relies on a mini-DisplayPort connector, which is also backward-compatible with traditional DisplayPort monitors.

A switch to micro-DisplayPort could allow Apple to trim its notebooks even further, and looking at the MacBook Pro 13″ with Retina Display for instance, having a spec of just 3.46 pounds and 0.71-inches thick, who knows how light or thin they could get if the micro-DisplayPort gets standardized.

Thank you Slashgear for providing us with this information

Club3D SenseVision MST Hub CSV-5300 Review

Introduction And Feature Overview


The unique ability of the DisplayPort signal to be split into multiple streams is something that has been around for a while, namely since DisplayPort 1.1 compatible graphics cards have been on the market. AMD’s HD 5000 series were the first to offer multiple display outputs from a single DisplayPort but is very much limited by the low bandwidth of DP 1.1. In terms of DisplayPort innovations we haven’t really seen an MST hub from anyone up until now which has been quite sad.

Today we are looking something that isn’t exactly glamorous but fills quite a large hole in the market. Club3D’s MST (Multi Stream Transport) DisplayPort Hub is one of the first of those elusive MST hubs that allows you to split off a DisplayPort compatible graphics card output into any combination of resolutions that fills the maximum bandwidth of the link, the two links would be DisplayPort 1.1 or 1.2 aka HBR and HBR2. You can see full  bandwidth details below:

Most people will choose to use a trio of 1080p displays as these are currently the most affordable solutions on the market. This MST hub from Club3D does support Eyefinity but Nvidia surround does not work due to a lack of driver support from Nvidia, if and when Nvidia fix it the MST Hub will support it.

The ability to split a DisplayPort output into up to three displays of varying resolutions will also come in useful for mobile workstations where you need more display real estate but simply can’t get that in a mobile solution or when your graphics card supports more displays than it has ports. The Club3D MST Hub does require an external power source but uses only around 2.5-3.5 Watts.

The biggest rival to Club3D is the Matrox TripleHead2Go DP Edition but costing around £275+ this is mainly limited to the professional and business markets – most other people have made-do with other more affordable compromises and solutions. Club3D’s MST Hub on the other hand costs only around £90-100 making it about a third of the cost of its biggest rival and unlike the Matrox product the Club3D MST supports a higher overall resolution and more bandwidth over DP 1.2. This is compared to the maximum of 5760 by 1080 supported on the Matrox. It is also worth noting that the Matrox unit processes “on-chip” and sends the signal to the three monitors so isn’t capable of gaming, high frame rates or ultra high definition video playback whereas the Club3D MST retrieves the processing from the GPU so supports everything that the GPU would support.

The Club3D MST Hub, pictured above, serves a very functional purpose for desktop systems.  With the vast majority of graphics cards only having three to four display outputs, yet supporting 6 displays, the only way to achieve more displays than the number of ports is to use one of these MST hubs. We will be testing the Club3D MST hub’s capabilities in a triple display scenario through one port because unfortunately we do not have six displays or a second MST Hub.

Features

  • Standards compliance/support:displayport v1.2, displayport v1.1a,VESA DDM
  • Standard,HDCP V2.0,DisplayId,and EDID V1.4
  • Supports main link rates of 5.4 bps(HBR2),2.7 bps(HBR)and 1.62 bps(RBR) from source
  • Supports 1/2/4 lanes of main link for RX side
  • Supports three DP++ output port,or two dual-link DVI ports,or the combination of ports
  • For DP 1.2 source,supports DP1.2 MST multi video/audio steams
  • Supports 1.1 source,supports ViewXpand
  • Supports DP-DP Bypass mode
  • Supports AUX-CH enables SBM and I2C mapping over AUX between the source/sink and device
  • Dedicated I2C slave for main processor to access the device
  • Supported output resolution:up to 2560X1600@60Hz each monitor in DP1.2 MST and up to FHD/1080p in DP1.1 or DP 1.2 SST
  • Input pixel data depth 6/8/10/12 bits and supports output pixel format RGB444

Club 3D Announce Affordable Multiple Display Hub

When you think of multi-display set-ups you think of expensive graphics cards and processors as pre-requisites before you’ve even invested into three monitors which are expensive enough in themselves. Most of the time triple monitor set-ups aren’t even used for gaming, but for productivity purposes, so that begs the question is there not a cheaper way to get a triple monitor set-up?

With all that said Club 3D have come up with a solution to this problem with their Multi Stream Hub (MST) that allows you to turn a single display port output into three display port outputs. From there you can then connect up to three monitors via VGA, DVI, HDMI or DisplayPort using the appropriate cables. This allows you to turn any device that supports display port into a functional triple display set-up. This means you can potentially use a cheap laptop, tablet or PC, but of course you need to make the investment in three displays which will always be a reasonably expensive outlay.

The Club 3D MST splits  the display signal from a DisplayPort 1.2 connection and provides three separate signals. The MST is capable of driving up to three 2560 by 1600 displays, although most people are more likely to use three 1080p displays.

The main selling point of the Club 3D MST is it is an affordable solution to the multi-monitor problem. What do you think of their new product?

Product Features

  • Standards compliance/support: Displayport v1.2, displayport v1.1a,VESA DDM
  • Standard, HDCP V2.0, DisplayID, and EDID v1.4
  • Supports main link rates of 5.4 Gbps (HBR2), 2.7 Gbps (HBR), and 1.62 Gbps(RBR) from source
  • Supports 1/2/4 lanes of main link for RX side
  • Supports three DP++ output port,or two dual-link DVI ports,or the combination of ports
  • For DP 1.2 source,supports DP1.2 MST multi video/audio steams
  • Supports 1.1 source,supports ViewXpand
  • Supports DP-DP Bypass mode
  • Supports AUX-CH enables SBM and I2C mapping over AUX between the source/sink and device
  • Dedicated I2C slave for main processor to access the device
  • Supported output resolution:up to 2560 x 1600 @60 Hz each monitor in DP 1.2 MST and up to FHD/1080p in DP 1.1 or DP 1.2 SST
  • Input pixel data depth 6/8/10/12 bits and supports output pixel format RGB444

Source: PR