Ark: Survival Evolved Lawsuit Has Been Settled

Who doesn’t love building a base? Well, when it comes to building a base having some help from your tribe sure comes in handy, even more so when they bring a T-rex to help keep you safe while you finish your little hut. Ark: Survival Evolved allows players to enjoy this amongst so much more, but the future of the game was brought into question when its origins were questioned in a lawsuit, don’t worry through because the lawsuit has now been settled.

The final word was said on the 13th of April 2016 according to the documents both parties involved filed, saying that they had finalised a “written settlement agreement”. The parties involved are Wildcard, the creators behind Ark: Survival Evolved and Trendy, the creators of the popular co-op game, Dungeon Defenders.

Earlier in the week Susan Stieglitz, wife to Jeremy Stieglitz, the man at the core of the lawsuit, posted the following hinting at the sum that Trendy were after.

https://twitter.com/SusanCStieglitz/status/719987095796711424

In a Reddit post there appears to be an image capturing a conversation in which Susan Claire Stieglitz states that “we ended up settling for 40”. With no confirmation and the details not being publicly released, there isn’t any hard evidence to talk about the outcome of the lawsuit expect speculation and the fact that it has in fact ended. With Ark: Survival Evolved still marked as early access on Steam, losing out on any income (especially something as large as 40 million), the game is sure to feel the impact and people will want to know if they have had to pay this money rather than towards developing an outstandingly exciting game.

Japan’s Robot Hotel Has Velociraptor Receptionist

Why open a hotel staffed almost exclusively by robots, with a Velociraptor behind the reception desk? Because Japan, of course. Henn na, or Weird Hotel in English, uses automated systems and human-like automatons – plus one dinosaur-shaped one – to fulfil the needs of its guests. The Velociraptor, donned with the same uniformed hat as the other “staff members”, tells new guests, “If you want to check in, push one.”

The hotel’s owner, Hideo Sawada, insists that the robotic workers are more than just a gimmick, and that the endeavour is an effort to reduce costs and increase efficiency. “I wanted to highlight innovation,” Sawada said, during the hotel’s opening on Wednesday. “I also wanted to do something about hotel prices going up.”

A night’s stay at the Weird Hotel costs a very reasonable 9,000 yen ($80), which is about three times less than the average Japanese hotel.

Despite mechanoids taking over the majority of tasks usually assigned to humans, there are still some jobs that a robot can’t do. “They still can’t make beds,” Sawada laments.

Sawada has plans to turn Henn na into a franchise; a second Japanese hotel, followed by a global expansion. In the meantime, he is keen to test different languages, such as Mandarin and Korean on the first hotel’s foreign visitors.

Thank you The Guardian for providing us with this information.

Crytek Reveales Its Upcoming Virtual Reality Game

Crytek always strived to bring the most immersive user experience on the market. Today, virtual reality might be the key for the company, allowing them to place the player in a world where there are no limits to what creativity could accomplish.

The latest news shows that Crytek has worked hard on a new virtual reality title named Robinson: The Journey. Judging by its poster, the game is about a lot of exploration in a fully immersive VR experience. We see that the action takes place on an alien planet, filled with dense vegetation and dinosaurs.

The dinosaur addition leads us to believe that part of the game footage was already leaked in Crytek’s dinosaur VR demo previously demoed, but the company wants you to experience more than just some 3D animated creatures walking past or chasing you. Crytek’s Director of Production, David Bowman, said that the title aims at reshaping how people think about games.

What Bowman means is that the company plans on delivering players a means of fully interacting with its vast environment using the latest tech available on the market. However, VR tech is also known for its pesky nausea effect, so players may still be able to enjoy just a few minutes or maybe even an hour of continuous gameplay. Nonetheless, the title will still be one of the first to set the grounds for future VR games.

Thank you DSOGaming for providing us with this information

DOTA 2 Rejected Character Concept Recreated by Player In-Game

It looks like DOTA 2 player, MaxOfS2D, has recreated a ‘failed’ character concept designed by Valve; the recreated concept can be viewed in the video below.

Valve has provided access to its database of rejected concept design for the highly anticipated Faceless Void remodel over the weekend. The character model is said to have been offered as a compendium reward during last year’s DOTA 2 International.

The company is said to have dropped quite a few redesign options, including the wand-bearing dinosaur interpretation of Faceless Void and Lobster Void. Valve apparently has strict guidelines regarding what hero creations enter the title. It is said that one guideline involves heroes that have to get along with the game’s lore, which is why we won’t see this Faceless Void character anywhere beyond a player mod.

Thank you Polygon for providing us with this information

Longest Dinosaur Poop Goes Up For Aution, Any Takers?

We’ve seen loads of cool stories about weird and wonderful things going up for auction here at eTeknix, from the recent Aphex Twin album that Notch bought, the worlds first microchip30k BitCoins and even a fully working Apple I computer. They’re what I would personally class as the wonderful stuff, but this new one is certainly going under the weird column.

Between 33 and 5 million years ago a dinosaur stopped to take a massive dump, before moving along and forgetting all about it. Skip forward a few million years and that deposit is on a plinth in an auction house, just waiting for you to make a bid for what could be a truly unique conversation starter next time you have a date over.

Knows as a Coprolite, a fancy word for fossilized feces, the fossil is currently on sale at the I. M. Chait gallery in Los Angeles, California. With the following description on the listing:

This truly spectacular specimen is possibly the longest example of coprolite – fossilized dinosaur feces – ever to be offered at auction. It boasts a wonderfully even, pale brown-yellow coloring and terrifically detailed texture to the heavily botryoidal surface across the whole of its immense length. The passer of this remarkable object is unknown, but it is nonetheless a highly evocative specimen of unprecedented size, presented in four sections, each with a heavy black marble custom base, an eye-watering 40 inches in length overall.
Estimate $8,000-10,000″

So there you have it, a piece of history is awaiting your bid, any takers?

Thank you Popsci for providing us with this information.