Exploit Found In Netgear Routers

So we’ve all had those periods where we come home and think our stuff has been moved around, you know when you think you’ve put your keys down beside the door and you find them on the sitting room table. Now imagine that you came home and found that some of your technology has had its settings changed, and most worryingly the technology in question is your router, the central point for all your devices to enter the world wide web. Turns out this happened to Joe Giron when he found out that his router had its settings changed on the 28th September.

Joe Giron told the BBC that he had discovered that some settings, not any settings, but the admin settings on his personal router had been changed. After the device was changed it began to send web browsing data to an internet address, clearly for a malicious reason.

The router in question is one of Netgear’s, a known brand all around the world. Netgear has accepted that the vulnerability that Giron was affected by is “serious” but will affect less than 5,000 devices.

The problem is the data that was changed was the domain name server setting, normally set to your web providers or in this case Google’s. The DNS transforms web addresses into formats which computers can understand, most commonly a form of IP address. With control over these settings it’s not only possible to track visited sites but also redirect the user to whichever site you want.

Updated:

It has been confirmed by Netgear that  an update to deal with this issue will be released on the 14th October. Affected users will be prompted to update their firmware if they log into their admin settings or have the Netgear genie app installed on any connected device.

Thank you BBC for the information.

$75,000 Reward In Hunt For Drone Users

Drones are amazing devices, being able to fly a device throughout your garden and beyond, taking pictures that are breathtaking and near impossible for any one person to manage. The problems begin when users begin to do stupid things and end up endangering lives with the devices. Such as those who are now the focus of a hunt with a possible reward offering around $75,000 to the one who helps catch them.

Drones have caused a few problems in recent months, drone users have almost been responsible for 14 near misses with commercial planes between March 2014 and March 2015. With a jail sentence of 5 years for even endangering the planes, the CAA really want to drive home that it is unacceptable to use drones near airplanes. Across the pond in California, San Bernardino county to be precise, a reward of $75k has been offered to anyone who can help track down drone pilots who are flying their drones over the forest fires in the country recently.

The first incident involved a drone flying too close to a flight path, resulting in a $10,000 detour for three planes carrying flame retardant, not only costing a lot of money but also hampering the US Forest Services attempts to control and prevent the forest fire from spreading. The drone in question was flying above the legal limit of 400 feet and was also in the no-fly zone commonly put forward when dealing with wildfires.

The second fire resulted in firefighting helicopters being forced to land with as many as five drones present in the area of the fire, the subsequent fire then spread to the highway where at least 20 cars were destroyed by the flames. Luckily the passengers had managed to escape on foot prior to the fire reaching them. This was only a few days after they were forced to suspend a tanker arriving after a drone was spotted in the area around another wildfire.

With three possible culprits an offer of $25,000 has been put forward for the apprehension of the drone pilots, in what can only be considered as serious action against those who would endanger lives and property for a quick photo opportunity.

With lives being endangered on a nearly weekly rate, drone users need to be more careful and considerate or face serious repercussions for their actions.

Thank you Ars Technica for the information.

Image courtesy of the BBC.

Drone Enters Flightpath of Passenger Airplane

Drones, the enthusiast way to get your videos taken from a perspective only caught by hanging off a tall object or sending a camera into space on a weather balloon. It was only a matter of time before someone decided to toy with its much larger cousin, a commercial aircraft.

On Friday, a keen enthusiast looking for the perfect shot, took to the Dallas Love Field with their trusty quadcopter. Once in the air, it isn’t clear whether they were going for a scenery shot or a unique look at a landing aircraft; either way it was too close for comfort and some airspace laws.

As a Southwest flight began its descent, the pilot called into air traffic control to report the sighting of a quadcopter within “a few hundred feet”.

“It was close enough to Love Field that the air traffic controller was able to see it from the tower,” Lynn Lunsford, a Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman told a local newspaper.

“Our pilots on the flight deck of Flight 28 observed a traffic conflict as they approached Dallas Love Field,” stated Alyssa Eliasen, a Southwest spokeswoman. “The flight landed safely and our crew filed a report with appropriate agencies. The Safety of our customers and employees is our top priority and our pilots take this responsibility very seriously.”

“We’re concerned because these are easily purchased devices, and they have pretty amazing capabilities,” Mark Duebner, the city’s director of aviation, told the Dallas Morning News. “But I don’t think the average person understands the airspace limits around the airport because they wouldn’t have reason to know them… We need to do some campaigns to raise public awareness, though because we don’t need these anywhere near the airport.”

Local police forces on ground and air were deployed very quickly after the incident, but couldn’t recover the drone nor the operator. With the easy access to drones, should they be controlled in a similar way to which model RC craft can only operate in certain areas as not to cause conflict with flight paths? Let us know in the comments.

Thank you to ArsTechnica for providing us with this information.

Giant STOP Sign Projected Onto A Makeshift Waterfall

We’ve all been in a vehicle and found ourselves cursing at other drivers due to their negligent driver skills, or lack of, right? Whether it be the forgetfulness of having indicators to tell other drivers which direction they are turning or the lack of not reading road signs appropriately; mainly STOP signs.

Now imagine if these particular drivers were confronted with a huge image of a STOP sign that they simply couldn’t ignore. A lighting show company Laservision have developed a technology which consists of laser-projecting a STOP sign onto makeshift waterfall and have been experimenting with the technology since 2007 in Australia.

The technology comes to light after a truck driver ignored warning signs and almost wedged his vehicle in the Sydney Harbour Tunnel reports 10 news. Described as a water curtain, the Australian government are hoping to stop tall vehicles such as trucks from attempting to pass under tunnels which simply aren’t tall enough.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NoTMC-uxJoo[/youtube]

Image courtesy of 10 News (YouTube)