Who’s Your Daddy is Easily the Weirdest Game in a Long Time

This has to be one of the most bizarre games ever created and yet it isn’t that bad either. In fact, it could be a fun and addictive game. We’ve seen weird games become a success before, such as Goat Simulator that didn’t have much to do with simulation at all, so maybe the same will work for Who’s Your Daddy.

The title Who’s Your Daddy reminds us more of a line from a cheap softcore movie than a game, but it is a new game. Behind this weird title is a game pits fathers against their babies, yes you read that right, in a 1 vs 1 match where you control either the father or the baby. Your job as the dad is to protect your kid from a horrific and deadly accident in your virtual home, just as in real life, whereas the second player is where it gets bizarre. The second player will control the baby with the mission to try to kill itself before the father can stop it. Now that’s a game principle that we haven’t seen before.

There are all kinds of hazards in a home from power outlets to poison, from ovens to trashcans, and much more, and you can explore all that in this weird game that started out as a fun idea before turning into something marketable.

The game has been successfully funded on Kickstarter, albeit with a small goal, and is now waiting to be greenlit on Steam. If you could see yourself play this game then you should head over to the Steam Greenlight section and vote for it.

Below you can watch the Kickstarter trailer where the man behind the game introduces it as well as some alpha-stage gameplay. Would you play this game or is it just a little too weird for you? Let us know in the comments.

Steam Controller Hopes to Allow Disabled Father to Play Skyrim

Video games can do a lot of things. You can play them with your friends while sitting on the sofa, or play with people on other side of the world. You can sit down at a party and sing your favourite songs while your friends play the music, or conquer an entire world on your own. One thing that some people find rewarding is playing games with the ones they care about the most, be that their friends or family. Eli Jewett is one of the latter, playing games with his dad who recently wanted to play Skyrim. There was one problem, though, his dad can only use his right hand.

Chris Hepburn has a post that is known for allowing people to request a controller mapping for certain games. Jewett saw this and requested a one-handed profile for Skyrim using the Steam controller. Hepburn was asked by GameSpot why he decided to take up this request and Detailed in the video below, the end result was a combination of motion and physical controls such as mapping movement to the tilt sensor while looking around was done via the right track pad.

“The son wanted his dad to play Skyrim! Enough said. Who wouldn’t want their dad to share Skyrim with them?” asked Hepburn. “We’ve all played Skyrim and this guy’s dad wants to try it. Had to make it at that point.”

https://youtu.be/PN5_BdqZCnk

While he has yet to test the profile Jewetts father launched Skyrim after being told about the creation hopefully a game he will be able to enjoy soon. Hepburn has stated that he would go back and change the profile over and over until Jewetts dad is comfortable with it, while Hepbrun is going to take on more profile requests, such as one for a woman who has arthritis and cannot use her thumbs. “Valve are the real innovators here. They gave us the tools to help each other” Hepbrun added.

This is the gaming community that I enjoy being a part of, one where you not only enjoy playing with your friends and family but are also willing to help out others so they can share in that enjoyment.

Dad Constructs Enormous Death Star to Entertain His Children

Star Wars: The Force Awakens premieres on December 14th in Los Angeles and predicted to smash box office records. As you might expect, science-fiction fans are anxiously waiting to see the next installment in the franchise. Additionally, the plot and character development has been kept relatively secret, which means the movie’s narrative is still a mystery. Nevertheless, to mark this momentous occasion, super-fan Colby Powell recently started a project to build a fully operational Death Star.

The final piece measures 23 feet in diameter and looks phenomenal. Even more unbelievable, 162 Geohubs, 18 cans of paint and 2,000 feet of 1/2 inch PVC was used to create this mammoth sculpture. The creator went to extreme lengths to finish the construction and even hired a large crane. When powered on, the Death Star glows in a menacing manner and monitors the universe for its next target. Either the universe, or a cluttered house in Lafayette (same thing right?).

Clearly, the Death Star is built just in time for the latest movie. Perhaps, there’s a TV inside to watch Star Wars while on the look out for Rebel traitors. In all seriousness, this is a wonderful project and it’s fantastic to see the final result.

Are you looking forward to the new Star Wars movie?

Dad Builds Gloves to Teach His Kids Proper Typing Skills

David Schneider was a bit bothered by his kids typing skills and decided to do something against it. Not that they couldn’t type fast, but it was hectic and inefficient. He decided to fix this himself and did so by building haptic gloves to teach them.

David got the inspiration for his gloves from Thad Starner’s gloves that could teach the wearer to play Beethoven. These might not be as fascinating as his model, but the results still speak for themselves. The gloves were created by sewing miniature vibrating motors into a pair of cycling gloves, one for each finger and then controlling them with an Arduino nano.

[youtube width=”800″ height=”500″]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uZKo2RqXKr4[/youtube]

The Arduino nano (ATmega168) controls the eight vibrating motors and each one has the corresponding letters assigned. For example if an A was required, the motor for the left pinky would be activated. The software part is combination of Tkinter to make the interface and python fr the rest of the code. So far his software is fairly simple and just uses the 100 most common words form the English language.

He also got his wife to record the words as audio and that is played along with a show of the word to type in 64 point red typeface, one letter at a time. At the same time the Arduino board activates the corresponding motor and the user learns what finger to use for what key. The application has the option for variable speed, can skip words and also gives feedback on the entered letters in 64 point red typeface.

David reveals that the tool works very well to help teach his children, but will look to install a game of sorts in the future. “I’ve not yet figured out the particulars, but somehow I’ll have to add motivational timers, badges, health points, and bright, flashing ‘game over’ blinkers if I want my 11-year-old to benefit from my high-tech typing tutor.”

It doesn’t take much besides some ingenuity any more, and of curse an Arduino board, to create some relative simple and useful toys as well as learning tools. The more of these simple things I see, the more I need to get myself a couple of these to play around with.

Thank you ieee.org for providing us with this information

Images courtesy of ieee.org.