New Jersey Could See Texting While Walking Made Illegal

We’ve all done it before. We want to get somewhere and suddenly our phone buzzes in our pocket, not wanting to seem rude we start texting back while walking along. This is done by hundreds, if not thousands, of people on a daily basis and I’ve got bad news if you live in New Jersey because this act could soon become illegal.

The “distracted walking” measure is being proposed by state assemblywoman, Pamela Lampitt, and could see anything that distracts you thanks to technology walking made illegal in New Jersey. It’s not the first time a law has targeted this issue, a bill that’s currently pending in Hawaii could see you fined $250 if you crossed the street with an electronic device in your hand, and this is just one of many proposed bills that could see people fined for being distracted from walking and moving in public while on their electric devices.

The law would see anyone who is caught walking while texting and stop people from walking near public roads with electronic communication devices in their hands. The punishment for this crime would be $50 or 15 days imprisonment, or even worse, both. This comes in at the same penalty as jaywalking and would see half the funds allocated to “safety education about the dangers of walking and texting”.

Is this too far? Some see it as the government trying to distract people from real issues but addressing small ones that could be fixed with better education regarding the dangers in the first place. Could the police catch you if you even broke the law? If you stopped and finished a text, could they still arrest you? We will have to see.

China Looking at Creating “Precrime” System

When people start to think about digital surveillance and their data stored online, they think about cases such as Apple vs the FBI where modern technology is used to try track down criminals or find out more about what could have or has happened. China looks to go a step further creating a “precrime” system to find out about crimes you will commit.

The movie Minority Report posed an interesting question to people if you knew that someone was going to commit a crime, would you be able to charge them for it before it even happens? If we knew you were going to pirate a video game when it goes online, does that mean we can charge you for stealing the game before you’ve even done it?

China is looking to do just that by creating a “unified information environment” where every piece of information about you would tell the authorities just what you normally do. Decide you want to something today and it could be an indication that you are about to commit or already have committed a criminal activity.

With machine learning and artificial intelligence being at the core of the project, predicting your activities and finding something which “deviates from the norm” can be difficult for even a person to figure out. When the new system goes live, being flagged up to the authorities would be as simple as making a few purchases online and a call to sort out the problem.

The National Crime Agency’s Anti-Cyber Crime Campaign is Embarrassing and Ignorant

The National Crime Agency embarked on an appalling advertising campaign yesterday “aimed at educating the parents of 12-15 year old boys” who might be proponents of cyber-crime. Already we can see the ignorance flowing here, as focusing on the male gender is incorrect, and targeting such a narrow age range seems completely ludicrous. Not only that, the organization created a checklist for parents to help investigate their own children and see if they are engaging in illegal activity. This is a prior warning, the compiled list is possibly the biggest pile of nonsense I’ve read in years.

“Warning signs of cyber crime

The following behaviours may indicate a young person is at risk of getting involved in cyber crime:

  • Is your child spending all of their time online?
  • Are they interested in coding? Do they have independent learning material on computing?
  • Do they have irregular sleeping patterns?
  • Do they get an income from their online activities, do you know why and how?
  • Are they resistant when asked what they do online?
  • Do they use the full data allowance on the home broadband?
  • Have they become more socially isolated?

If a young person is showing some of these signs try and have a conversation with them about their online activities. This will allow you to assess their computer knowledge proficiency so you can understand what they are doing, explain the consequences of cyber crime and help them make the right choices.”

There’s so much wrong with the questions above that I really don’t know where to start. The idea that children spending time online is a negative concept is unbelievably outdated, and laughable. The internet is an integral part of daily life from educational activities to keeping up with friends on various social media platforms. Additionally, human beings don’t all have to be brash, loudmouth extroverts, and social isolation isn’t anything to be suspicious off. In reality, many socially isolated people are very creative and struggle to communicate with people. Anxiety is a terrible condition to deal with its impossible for non-sufferers to understand the daily torment. That’s why it’s incredibly hurtful to judge people and be suspicious of them just because they want alone time.

On another note, the one key profession society will need in the future is programmers, and they are in short supply at the high skill level. We should be actively encouraging children to attain coding skills and make their interest in this field flourish. To insinuate this passion as a negative aspect is frankly, embarrassing.

Hilariously, the NCA contradicts themselves and goes onto say:

Ways to use cyber skills positively

Skills in coding, gaming, computer programming, cyber security or anything IT-related are in high demand and there are many careers and opportunities available to anyone with an interest in these areas.”

According to their impeccable logic (insert sarcasm here), coding is a suspicious trait but it’s a way to use skills in a positive manner. If anyone can explain what the marketing team has been drinking, I’d love to know. This entire campaign makes zero sense and is a complete farce. While some feel the need to ridicule it, I find it very worrying that people in power have such an idiotic and uneducated viewpoint on the subject matter. As previously mentioned, the government, the actors, and anyone else involved in this mess should feel ashamed.

If you’re brave enough, here’s the cringe-worthy video in full:

Arrested And Robbed All In One Night – All Streamed On Twitch

Live streaming is a big thing these days, with anybody being able to put on a camera, share their screen and show the world everything from their video games to board game parties. Sadly the opportunity to watch others from anywhere in the world has led to some rather nasty situations, one of these is the action known as ‘Swatting’. Swatting involves someone watching a live stream, and through various technological means, finding out the address of the streamer. With the address, they ring the police and often fabricate a situation where someone’s life is in danger and so the police act on the information they have and dispatch SWAT (special weapons and tactics) to the scene to help solve the situation. Normally they are still live streaming when the police burst through their doors, causing distress to everyone bar the caller.

Recently though this was not the case as during a live stream by Mr_13ig who was asked by a policeman to keep the volume down and for his details. After refusing to provide his details, he noticed one of his neighbours walk past and informed the officer that he was feeling harassed because his neighbour was taking photos of him. As the video continues the policemen arrests him for the noise complaint and his behaviour, only to then have two minutes later another crime happen in the apartment.

The neighbour who had walked past earlier, while being filmed by the live stream not only entered the apartment and took several items from the room, but then returned to take even more stuff, all the while seemingly oblivious to the fact that he was being recorded all the time.

You can watch the video here, and you’ll be glad to know that the neighbour who stole from the apartment has been charged with burglary thanks to the viewers ringing and informing the police about the crime.

Image courtesy of Twitch.

UK Drone Pilot Convicted In First Of Its Kind Ruling

Last week we reported on how a 26-year-old man in America was arrested after his drone crashed in the Louis Armstrong Stadium. It seems the law has caught up on this side of the ocean as a man has now been convicted of flying his drone over a packed football ground.

Nigel Wilson was arrested earlier this year after he was caught flying his drone over Manchester City’s Etihad Stadium. Wilson has since been charged with disobeying the Civil Aviation Authorities Air Navigation Order (2009) by not keeping direct line of sight of the drone, flying it in a congested area and flying it within 50 metres of a building. After being charged with these offences, Wilson has given a Criminal Behaviour order banning him from purchasing, owning or flying any type of drone for two years, alongside a £1,800 fine and a further £600 in fees.

Turns out though that Mr Wilson has committed this offence several times before, including several landmarks in London, such as Buckingham Palace and the HMS Belfast, and even filming various football matches with his drone. During an incident in Anfield Stadium in September the drone was flown close to mounted officers, startling the horses on a busy walkway, endangering the nearby pedestrians.

With a fine and banned from using the drone will he rethink his use of this technology in the future, and will it persuade others to think more carefully before using drones in this manner?

Thank you Met Police for the information.

Image courtesy of The Blaze.

UK Residents Can Now Check the Crime Rate in Their Local Area

A new service which records data on committed offences and shows how safe your local area is now available! Simply enter your Postcode, and the database will search an archive stretching back to December 2010 and lists results within a 1-mile radius. Currently, over 1.7 million Royal Mail postcodes are available so the service will not work for everyone. Additionally, you can check the crime rate of Universities or Football Stadiums.

To test this intriguing feature, I entered my postcode and awaited the results. I was fairly shocked to see 469 crimes reported in May 2015 throughout my local vicinity. 243 were counts of Anti-social behaviour, 36 of Criminal damage and 75 instances of Violence and sexual offences. There is additional information relating to the specific details of each crime. For example, the website can tell you if the theft was part of a Burglary or a Vehicle crime.

The real shock factor comes when the data shows exactly where the crimes took place. Each record will list the street or nearby location with a staggering degree of accuracy. On my street, there was a single count of criminal activity which came from a petty bike theft. Whatever your location or perceived view of local crime, the results are bound to cause a bit of alarm.

Thankfully this data isn’t included by law when you are trying to sell a property! I’m not entirely convinced that knowledge is the best policy here and living in ignorant bliss might be a better choice.

Check out Crime-Statistics.co.uk for more information.

Cyberbullying Now Illegal In New Zealand

Cyberbullying is a problem a lot of people have faced. The concept of being able to bully without having to directly see the results or the person your bullying has meant that people feel like cyberbullying is almost victimless. The truth is far from this, with people being haunted and hunted both offline and online, often resulting in the desired effect of causing emotional harm to the messages recipient. The problem with cyber bullying is that because the location of the attacker is across the other side of the world and because of the means they use to communicate, it is often hard or impossible to catch up with and charge the culprit.

New Zealand has brought into law a new piece of legislation which prohibits several of the common habits that are considered cyberbullying. The legislation bans any communication which would be considered racist, sexist, against someone’s sexuality or religion or makes a comment about disability. The law also goes on to expand to messages where they are “designed to cause serious emotional distress”, this of course leads to the problem of determining if a person meant hard when they sent a message. If you are found to be guilty of cyber bullying you can face up to two years in jail.

In addition to the cyberbullying act, the legislation also expands on inciting suicide, resulting in three years in jail if you are found to be encouraging the act.

In order to combat the new issues, a new agency has been formed and are investigating and continuing on acts which Twitter and Facebook have reported.  The hope is that companies such as Facebook and Twitter will sign deals with thew new agency, allowing a series of collaborations that will allow all three groups to act quicker and with greater efficiency than before.

Have you ever been cyberbullied? Do you believe it should be regarded as a crime? Should other countries take heed and create their own legislation for dealing with cyber bullying?

Thank you Engadget for providing us with this information

Image courtesy of StopCyberbullying.org

Hackers Took Up Residence Inside Government PC for a Year!

I recently wrote an article which looked at the Cyber attack and subsequent theft of 4.2 million American Federal data of employees which was transferred from the Office of Personnel Management to an external source. At the time it seemed to be a well orchestrated planned attack which granted criminals access to a government network for a brief period of time, the word brief in this case is very much redundant now, as  new information has come to light.

This attack on the Personnel Management’s security-clearance computer system which is slightly different to the personal database was first breached in June, 2014 according to new information. This effectively means that hackers had access to a sensitive system for at least a year. Hackers had access to the personal database for 4 months before this intrusion was detected. The confirmation came from Stewart Baker who is a former National Security Agency general counsel. There is also strong speculation that these Hacks had originated from China, which means if true, this is one of the most sensitive pieces of information to be reached by state-sponsored hackers.  If these virtual intruders stayed any longer, officials would be asking them to pay rent.

There lays the murky layers of state organized crimes, if true, China will deny responsibility, but as we all know, China has farmed hacking and infiltration out to factory designed hackers who are still on the payroll, but the Chinese government can deny this as it was not directly them.

Perhaps it’s time for the US government to invest in protecting its citizens rather than placing them under virtual surveillance, if this information leakage continues; private citizens will find themselves virtually held in a different country.

Thank You The Washington Post for providing us with this information

Image courtesy of huffingtonpost

The Resale Cost Of Stolen Data


Crime doesn’t pay. Cyber crime on the other hand pays handsomely according to the current resale price tag associated with the data breach, which led to 4.2 million American Federal data of employees being transferred from the Office of Personal Management to as yet unknown source. Analysis has identified places within various dark net marketplaces which are reselling the data from as little as 50 cents to $10 (£6.30) Now I know what you’re thinking, “You cannot become rich over 10 bob” Very true, you can’t, But experts have placed a total value of every single piece of data which had been breached to nearer $140 million dollars (£88,186,198.86)

These so-called “sets” contain every piece of information from a particular person which includes name and birth etc. While scanning through the information it becomes clear the fly is very much in the ointment for people up to no good, at first glance you would think all these identities are genuine which they are, but if you had your information stolen you would correct this, If you had a password hacked then you would change it, this is exactly what has happened with the data. Once someone suspects they have been breached, they make plans to correct it. The odds are for every 10 pieces of information which are sold for $10 each, only one will work.

It’s shocking but not surprising that sensitive data as personal as in this case did not have a better protection mechanism, it’s also clear this data was not encrypted if criminals have had access to it. I also think companies who hold sensitive information about our identities need to invest to build infrastructure to cope with it, otherwise essentially every single person could be cloned. Only time will tell if this data breach was indeed state-sponsored or a lone wolf acting with criminal intent

Thank You Vocativ for providing us with this information

Image Courtesy of Kennisalliantie

LastPass Cloud Database Hack Compromises Hashed Master Passwords

Unknown attackers have made off with LastPass account emails, password reminders and hashed user vault master passwords. CEO Joe Siegrist was quick to note that no encrypted user vault data, plaintext passwords or user accounts were accessed. This is the second security breach LastPass has faced in four years. Despite the compromise of the hashed passwords, there is no need to panic just yet.

As befitting a security firm, LastPass chose a more secure way of cryptographically hashing user master passwords. Instead of going with fast md5 or SHA1commonly used, LastPass used PBKDF2-SHA256 with a random salt and 100,000 rounds. With the addition of at least 5,000 more iterations client side, it will make it difficult to hack the hashes and obtain the password. As the encrypted users vaults were also not accessed, attackers will have to obtain that some other way as well.

LastPass is also ensuring users who are logging in from an unverified IP or device to verify via email unless they already have two-factor authentication. Given the above average security, there is no rush to change stored plaintext passwords or the master password just yet, but the earlier it can be done the better. With the difficulty of cracking a password, only those who are likely to be specifically targeted should worry.

Storing passwords anywhere is risky and even more so in the cloud as this attack demonstrated. However, user machines are already quite vulnerable and using a password manager is better than not. The stronger security offered by password manager for regular passwords is invaluable and with only 1 master password to remember, it can be more complex and longer. I know I will continue to use my cloud supported password manager but maybe I think I’ll rethink my plans to store my banking credentials. You can find the LastPass blog post on the incident here.

Lizard Squad Teen Guilty Of 23 Charges Of Online Harassment and Swatting

Lizard Squad was once an unknown name among a lot of people, however, this changed when both the Playstation Online and Xbox Gold systems were taken offline over the Christmas Period. The group claiming responsibility, Lizard Squad, then began selling their services to hack and DOS (denial of service attack, in which a web site is forced offline by a barrage of traffic sent to the website companies). At one point they even claimed a bomb had been planted on the plane which John Smedley, Sony Online Entertainments Boss, was about to depart on. A teenager in British Columbia (Canada), a member of Lizard Squad, has pleaded guilty to 23 charges against him.

Due to his age the defendant cannot be named, but his actions have been described in a day-long hearing. The defendant specifically  targeted young female gamers and their parents, adding the girls on League Of Legends or Twitter. If the girls in question declined his friend request he would turn malicious, even resorting to doxxing (posting someone’s personal information online) or swatting (calling the police pretending that someone is being held hostage in their property or has been killed).

One woman he swatted, a student at the University of Arizona in Tucson, left her course after armed police dragged away family members during the second swatting of that week. He then continued to brag about his exploits, both on twitter and during an eight-hour live stream on Youtube in which he was seen to be swatting numerous people, during which viewers reported him to the police.

Several Lizard Squad members have been arrested, two of which were from the UK, one formally charged with Swatting and being involved in the Christmas hacks against Playstation and Xbox.

Personally I have no love for people who decided to ruin other people’s lives and experiences for laughs or personal gain, especially when people are quite often traumatised by swatting incidents. If you ever doubt how serious these actions are, you can watch a Runescape streamers reaction to a swatting that occurred on his channel (Be warned, this video is extremely emotional, you can watch it here). With sentencing due on the 29th June, it will be interesting to see the verdict of this trial and how it impacts future cases.

Thank you Eurogamer and for the information.

Image Courtesy of the Independent.

Hackers Stealing Money Through Starbucks Accounts

Hackers have been accessing Starbucks accounts, through the coffee seller’s mobile apps, to steal thousands of pounds from unsuspecting customers. The rouse was uncovered by US journalist Bob Sullivan, who wrote on his blog:

Criminals are using Starbucks accounts to access consumers’ linked credit cards. Taking advantage of the Starbucks auto-reload function, they can steal hundreds of dollars in a matter of minutes. Because the crime is so simple, can escalate quickly, and the consumer protections controlling the transaction are unclear, I recommend all Starbucks consumers immediately disable auto-reload on the Starbucks mobile payments and gift cards.

The fraud is a big deal because Starbucks mobile payments are a big deal. Last year, Starbucks said it processed $2 billion in mobile payment transactions, and about 1 in 6 transactions at Starbucks are conducted with the Starbucks app.

It is still unclear as to how criminals have been using hacked accounts to steal money, but one theory is that they are purchasing Starbucks gift cards, which are then sold on, either through legitimate platforms or the dark web, via Tor.

Starbucks has been made aware of the issue but, rather unhelpfully, denies that its apps have been hacked:

Starbucks takes the obligation to protect customers’ information seriously. News reports that the Starbucks mobile app has been hacked are false.

Like all major retailers, the company has safeguards in place to constantly monitor for fraudulent activity and works closely with financial institutions. To protect the integrity of these security measures, Starbucks will not disclose specific details but can assure customers their security is incredibly important and all concerns related to customer security are taken seriously.

Occasionally, Starbucks receives reports from customers of unauthorized activity on their online account. This is primarily caused when criminals obtain reused names and passwords from other sites and attempt to apply that information to Starbucks. To protect their security, customers are encouraged to use different user names and passwords for different sites, especially those that keep financial information.

Though Starbucks passes the buck to the customer, it does at least acknowledge that any fraudulent activity is not the responsibility of the account holder.

Paul Martini, CEO of security firm iboss has certainly taken exception to Starbucks’ statement, accusing it of using semantic to absolve itself of responsibility:

This line of argument is so common now – it’s basically playing with words. Whether the app is literally hacked or not, it’s completely ridiculous. The design itself is flawed. Auto-reload should happen at the register. The second part issue is: why can people reload and drain a card within ten minutes?

If you are concerned about the security of your Starbucks account, simply turn off auto-reload on the Starbucks app, and make sure your username and password are distinct from one another.

Thank you The Next Web for providing us with this information.

Adobe is Suing Clothing Chain Forever 21 for Pirating Software

That’s not a headline you see everyday – Adobe is leading a suit against US clothing chain Forever 21, in which they allege that the chain repeatedly pirated a number of Adobe software applications, including Photoshop and Illustrator. The company is joined in the suit by AutoDesk and Corel, who claim that the company also pirated its software too.

The suit says that the company pirated 63 different instances of Adobe software and that they “continued their infringing activities even after being contacted by Adobe regarding the infringement.” Although we don’t know exactly how much money they want, the suit wants an injunction to be issued as well as the issue of compensation for any profits missed out on as a result of the piracy, as well as court costs and any additional damages that can be justified.

While individuals often get away with piracy, it seems that Adobe and others want to make it clear to corporations that piracy is indeed serious and that such a large business should know better.

Source: The Verge

Online Trolls Can Now Receive up to 2 Years in Jail

The UK government is ramping up efforts to tackle online abuse. Internet trolls are nothing new, but with more people spending more time online than ever before, online abuse and trolling is being taken more seriously than ever before.

There have been several high-profile cases in recent months, such as abuse towards the daughter of Robin Williams on Twitter after her fathers death, Judy Finnegan and her family receiving threats and more. In fact, it seems any major tragic event spawns some form of hatred and it’s not long before the abuse starts to flood in one direction or another.

Freedom of speech may be one thing, but the right to say almost anything you want doesn’t make you unaccountable for your actions. An amendment will be made to the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill that quadruples that maximum prison sentence for online trolling and abuse from 6 months to two years.

Mocking someone for owning an iPhone, joking around with your friends on Facebook or trying to reason with people in the YouTube comment section are still safe enough. Just remember to use some common sense before you take a joke too far.

Thank you TheNextWeb for providing us with this information.

Child Predator Caught after 14 Years on the run by Facial Recognition Software

BUSTED! A massive win for facial recognition software as it has helped catch a convicted child sex offender that has been on the run for 14 years! Neil Stammer was accused of sex crimes involving a child as well as kidnapping and other charges in New Mexico back in 2000. Stammer was released on bond and then went on the run and has been ever since, until now that is. Facial recognition technology was used on this photograph of him that was taken back in 1999 by the Diplomatic Security Service, facial recognition technology was being used by the DSS to crack down on fake US passports. The original photograph was scanned and checked though the DSS system and it found a match. 

Keven Hodges was the man who’s name appeared on the system, turns out this has been the name Neil Stammer has been using whilst living in Nepal, whilst teaching English to, you guessed it, small children. Sick bastard, enjoy prison!

Thanks to Tweaktown for supplying us with this information

Image courtesy of Tweaktown.

Samsung Factory Invaded by Armed Criminals, $36 Million in Gadget Stolen

The Samsung Campinas factory near Sao Paolo was attacked last Sunday night when seven armed assailants took over the factory, took the workers hostage and made off with a staggering $36 million in phones, tablets, notebooks, computers and more.

Seven armed robbers took hostages after stopping the staff shuttle bus. Two hostages were kept on board and eight more were set free. Once the route was clear, the group stole over 40,000 products as 13 other members of their group arrived in trucks. They used pallet loaders to fill the trucks and coordinated their efforts via radio and mobile phones in what was obviously a very well organised operation.

A spokesman for Samsung in Sao Paolo said: “We have cooperated fully with the police investigation that is underway and will do our best to avoid any sort of repeat incident.”

In fairness there is only so much you can do to prevent a situation like this, when weapons and hostages are involved in such great numbers, no one needs to be a hero and try save the day, especially when the goods that were stolen can likely be written off through insurance, when a life cannot.

Luckily none of the 100 employees who were present at the factory are reported to be hurt, although psychologically scars will no doubt be running pretty deep after such a traumatic ordeal.

Thank you PocketLint for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of PocketLint.

New Battlefield Title Dubbed ‘Hardline’ to be Released This Year

Electronic Arts had some hiccups and major bugs to fix in its latest Battlefield 4 release. That does not meant it will stop them from releasing another Battlefield title it seems, confirming the claims that the company is attempting to set a yearly cycle to the Battlefield title.

Dubbed Battlefield Hardline, Electronic Arts and Visceral Games has shifted the main focus of the Battlefield feel from the war between two or more armies to a more common battle, which is the war on crime. This is quite an interesting change, not only from the game’s objective and scope, but also from the development point of view.

EA’s DICE took charge of all Battlefield titles up until now, but Electronic Arts however decided to give Dead Space developers, Visceral Games, the lead this time around. What we expect to see as an outcome from all of this can be seen in the video below:

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GnXW9cq7umc[/youtube]

It appears that more light on the change is given from Visceral’s VP and GM Steve Papoutsis with the following statement:

“Several years ago, I was at an internal EA meeting in Barcelona with creative leaders from across the company. It was there I met Karl Magnus Troedsson, the GM of DICE, for the first time, and we immediately began talking about games – I’ve always loved Battlefield and KM was a huge fan of Dead Space, which I was working on at the time”, he said. “ We started talking about different ways we could work together, different ways we could take Battlefield and action games in a new direction. It was then that this project that became Battlefield Hardline was born.”

Sources also indicate that Battlefield Hardline along with other ‘secret’ projects will be revealed at E3 on the 9th of June.

Thank you KitGuru for providing us with this information
Image courtesy of KitGuru and video courtesy of YouTube

Suspect Arrested For Creation Of Blackhole Malware Exploit Kit

The suspected creator of the advanced malware tool Blackhole has been arrested. The man taken into custody is suspected of being the owner of the online alias “Paunch”, the name used by the creator of the Blackhool and Cool exploit kids that were used to attack flaws in Java, Flash, Windows and PDF files.

A spokesman for the law enforcement agency Europol said “Europol and the European Cybercrime Centre has been informed that a high-level suspected cyber criminal has been arrested” when speaking with the BBC.

Released back in 2010, the Blackhole kit has proved popular on the crimeware market, especially throughout 2012 and the start of this year. The code was licensed out for around $1,500 and could even be rented from the kits creator for around $200 a week.

The kits in question were fairly advanced and had a broad range of attacks that involved infecting hundreds of websites, downloading root kits, fake software and more to users computers that allowed access to the users computer or their data.

“If it’s true that the brains behind the Blackhole has been apprehended it’s a very big deal – a real coup for the cybercrime-fighting authorities, and hopefully cause disruption to the development of one of the most notorious exploit kits the web has ever seen,” said Graham Cluley. “However, it’s worth remembering that nature abhors a vacuum, and there would surely be other online criminals waiting to take their place, promoting their alternative exploit kits and malicious code.” he continued, when speaking with the BBC.

It appears the arrest may even be working already, as use of the software has dropped by 2% in recent days.

Thank you BBC for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of BBC.

Danish Supermarket Gets Cocaine Delivery Instead Of Bananas

Colombia is very well known for its problems with drugs, particularly cocaine, yet it is also very well known for its large amount of banana exports, which Latin America as a whole is very famous for along with the Caribbean too.  Strangely though you’d never expect these two paths to really cross, legal food exports and illegal drug exports. For one Danish supermarket exactly that recently happened according to reports.

Staff at a Coop chain supermarket in Aarhus, Western Denmark, were surprised to find that their boxes of bananas were heavier than usual. It was only upon opening and inspecting them that they found out that the boxes were actually all rammed full of Cocaine, a hefty 220 lbs of it.

A coop spokesman said more bags of cocaine were found later in another shipment from Colombia in their central dispatch depot in the nation’s capital Copenhagen. Naturally the coop contacted their Columbian supplier to find out what was going on. The Danish police are currently investigating but no arrests have been made.

According to some sources 220 lbs of Cocaine, around 100 kg, has a street value of $2-10 million USD depending on its quality. Maybe next time Danish customs officials might be a bit more suspicious of those “bananas” coming from Colombia.

Image courtesy of DailyRecord.co.uk