Speed Record Claimed by Modified Electric Corvette

The world record for the fastest street-legal all-electric vehicle has been awarded to the Genovation GXE, an all-electric conversion of the 2006 Z06 Corvette, which achieved a top speed of 186.8 mph at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The GXE is a prototype vehicle that employs state-of-the-art electric motors and batteries to deliver over 700 horsepower and 600 foot-pounds of torque. Genovation, the company responsible for the GXE stated that the record-breaking run took place on only their first day of testing and that it is expected that the vehicle will be pushed even further in future.

While 186.8 mph is an impressive speed for an electric car, beating out the Tesla Model S by over 30mph, the GXE will have a fight on its hands to keep the record. Many other high-end electric vehicle teams could be staged to take the record away, including Mitch Medford’s Bloodshed Motors, whose Zombie 222, a modified 1972 Datsun 1200, which was a previous holder of the world record, able to reach 173.2 mph last year. In an interview with The Verge about the GXE’s record run, Medford said that he and the Bloodshed Motors team were making some adjustments to the Zombie 222, which, when complete, aim to achieve over 200mph at the Texas Mile.

One of the concerns over electric cars was always held by enthusiasts, believing that electric vehicles could never be as impressive or capture the imagination the same way the internal combustion engine has. However with companies like Genovation and teams like Bloodshed Motors pushing electric vehicles to speeds that can compete with many traditional sports cars, I think we can rest assured that the excitement of cars will not end in the electric generation.

Researchers Prove How They Can Stop a Corvette with a Simple Text Message

Since a couple of hackers found a way to remotely control a Crysler, we’ve heard a lot of similar successful attempts on other vehicles. The latest comes from researchers over at the University of California, who have taken an interest in third-party devices coupled to the TCUs.

The TCUs are directly linked to a vehicle’s Controller Area Network bus, who sends and receives messages from all systems. The thing is that TCUs also have a SIM card to send data back to the manufacturer or insurance companies. This is how the researchers were able to discover, target and compromise a Corvette’s systems with just a simple text message.

The researchers made a two-staged attack, first by updating the device’s software, then making use of funnel commands which could be sent directly to the CAN bus. They were able to prove on a Corvette that they can remotely start the windshield wipers and ally the breaks while the car was moving.

In the researchers’ paper, they state that finding mobile numbers for TCU SIMs is fairly easy, having assigned numbers that start with the 566 area code. They also said that the TCUs are not cryptographically signed, allowing them to install the malicious software update without the TCU knowing and that TCU NAND flash units share the same SSH key, allowing hackers to use it on other TCUs.

Thank you PCWorld for providing us with this information