Oculus Founder Discusses Adoption Challenges For VR Headsets

The potential of Virtual Reality is rather exciting and is tipped to be one of the biggest attractions of this week’s CES (Consumer Electronic Show 2016), this is also where the gang of eTeknix are currently stationed in Las Vegas and are ready to bring you the very latest news. VR and the accompanying headsets do bring its own challenges, from adoption to market interest; there are many things to consider, so much so that Palmer Luckey, who is the founder of Oculus VR has discussed such issues and it’s very interesting.

On the subject of Virtual reality headsets replacing smartphones, Palmer Luckey stated that “the technology required many years of further development before it could replace smartphone’s for mainstream users” Mr Luckey also stated that VR headsets would need to be more powerful, cheaper and also slim enough for it to be considered to be both a viable alternative and also an appealing product for a wider adoption.

Asked how long it would take before we would see a ubiquitous use of VR, Mr Luckey stated that it could be anything from “five years – ten years”. The price point is also crucial and analysis by “Touchstone Research” have found that US Internet consumers would be willing to spend the following amounts on a VR device. As you can see, 31% would be willing to spend between $200 – $399 dollars, but if you go to the other end of the spectrum then it conveys that 6% would not be happy to spend a single dollar.

Palmer Luckey also recognises that “the current headset design is “obviously not the ideal form factor” as it is too bulky and needs to be slimmer. Further details include the recent announcement by Oculus concerning the finalization that it will be taking pre – orders for the Rift on January 6,th 2016 and shipping would be in the first quarter of 2016.

It will be interesting to note how this product performs and also how quickly this new tech is adopted by the market.

Image courtesy of fastcompany

Hewlett-Packard To Cut Up To 30,000 Jobs As Part Of Restructuring

Rapid expansion can have one fatal flaw, if you do not match or beat revenue expectations then you will have to eventually downsize your company. HP have found this out, or the employees to put it more accurately, have taken the brunt of another round of expected job cuts with the figure being somewhere in the region of 25,000 – 30,000 positions to fall.

The technology stalwart has confirmed these roles will go from HP Enterprise; this is with the aim of bundling together its data analysis and software divisions which in turn separates them from the personal computer and printer operation. This brutal scythe cutting will be completed by the end of October 2015; this is on top of 55,000 jobs which have already been culled over the last 3 years. HP aim to save around $2 billion annually from its business by reducing costs which include wages.

Chief executive Meg Whitman, who will lead HP Enterprise, informed investors of the potential to profit to the tune of around $50bn in annual revenue from the business. HP insists the company will be nimbler and therefore able to meet the “evolving needs of our customers around the world”.  The New York Times Square Stock Exchange has reacted badly, as expected to news of both further layoffs and also uncertainty over the direction of HP, it has lost 33% of its value in the year to date

Unfortunately, HP lost touch of the ever-evolving trend of consumer tech over the last decade or so, gone are the bulky towers and a large staffed manufacturing base with which to churn out consumer tech. Computers are now associated with tablets and smartphones and the trend of lighter gadgets have propelled a new innovation onto the market. HP will need to adjust or face further uncertainty, it’s a shame that ordinary employees are facing the brunt and employment is very uncertain considering the intense competition for fewer jobs within the world of tech.

Thank you sky news for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of devicebox

Bit Defender Admits To Being Hacked

Oh the irony never fails to amuse, an Anti Virus company who boast on keeping customers safe from online threats, have themselves falling victim to a hack. Kaspersky discovered a bot within their system and now so has Bit Defender, who have admitted to being hacked.

Bit Defenders security policy will be under heavy criticism after the hacker going by the name of DetoxRansome, claims to have access to the Bit Defender customer information which allegedly includes passwords. The hacker also claims this information has been stored in an unencrypted format by the antivirus giant.

Bit Defender have responded and stated that a “potential security issue with a server and determined a single application was targeted within a component of its public cloud offering”  The company have also responded to the amount of data which might have been leaked by stating that, “exposure of a few user accounts and passwords is very limited and it represents less than one percent of our SMB customers”

There are reports that the hacker has demanded Bit Defender pay a ransom of $15,000, or see all the information dumped online. As noted by news sources, the hacker looks as if they have dumped around 250 customers usernames and passwords onto the web. Among the names were extensions belonging to .gov, which indicates government customers might have been affected.

The Hackers version is the following “We had taken control of two BitDefender cloud servers and got all logins. Yes, they were unencrypted, I can prove it… they were using Amazon Elastic Web cloud which is notorious for SSL [a form of web encryption] problems.”

The level of severity depends on which version you believe, either Bit Defender have only comprised a reported 1% of data or the whole lot. One thing looks apparent, for the love of god, why oh why did they not encrypt sensitive information, if a company offers cloud storage then this has to be secure, or as near as.

In a corporate world as consumers you receive corporate promises, looks excellent on the outside, dig deeper and your logins might be on the open web. Only time will tell to the extent with which Bit Defender have been compromised, let’s hope this is an alarm call to change practises when storing sensitive information online, or not as the case all too often is.

Original Bit Defender logo courtesy of dev0blog

Thank You Forbes for providing us with this information

Retailers Must Invest in New Security Procedures, or Major Breaches Could Accelerate

Companies struggle greatly to try to keep their networks safe, including ensuring employee and customer data remains secure.  Major retailers are suffering data breaches that often lead to stolen customer debit and credit card data taken by hackers.

Popular retailer Target was compromised late last year and 40 million customers were affected – and the company has reportedly spent more than $145 million in expenses stemming from the incident.  Target’s sales temporarily dropped, customers were weary to continue shopping there, and it has been an overall public relations nightmare.

Home Depot recently confirmed a breach with up to 56 million potentially affected customers, with some stolen data posted in online cybercriminal forums.  It’s too early to tell what type of financial damage the company will suffer, but Home Depot will deal with the same type of backlash Target did.

Here is what Joe Caruso, Global Digital Forensics CEO noted:

“Most people tend to focus on how many credit card numbers were stolen, almost like it’s a way to score a game… but the numbers that should really be seeing the spotlight more are the ones that put dollar signs to the costly aftermath of a successful breach.”

Companies sometimes fail to even install antivirus and anti-malware technology, and then forget to conduct vulnerability assessments.  GDF recommends that companies be aware of what threat vectors could cause them the most problems, along with identifying weak links in the security chain.

Thank you to Global Digital Forensics for providing us with this information

Image courtesy of SoftPedia