Juniper Networks Finds ‘Unauthorised’ Code in Its Software

Cyber security and the integrity of applications are essential for consumers to have confidence their details will be kept safe and not intercepted by a third-party. Well known internet hardware company Juniper networks have issued a warning concerning a discovery it has made within its firewall software, which could have led to a third-party being able to decrypt data which has been sent through an encrypted VPN (Virtual Private Network)

During a recent internal code review, it was discovered that “unauthorised code” had somehow made its way into Juniper’s ScreenOS software, it’s interesting to note that many ISPs (Internet Service Providers) and also large firms implement the companies routers and network switches. The vulnerability could have allowed a third-party, or as the company refers to the threat as a “Knowledgeable attacker”, could be 12-year-old for all we know, to gain administrative access to NetScreen devices and to decrypt VPN connections.

The unwanted slice of extra code has been present within different versions of ScreenOS since 2012. Juniper has confirmed that it is not aware or received any reports of the vulnerabilities being exploited and urges everyone running the affected devices to quickly apply the released patches with the aim of stripping the unauthorised code out of its firewall software ASAP.

It’s a serious breach and questions will surely be asked concerning how the code managed to make its way into the software.

Image courtesy of smarteranalyst

First Detailed Public Map of the U.S. Internet Infrastructure Released

The location of major cables has always been a secret, but now researchers hope that the knowledge of it will spark thoughts on how to keep it safe.

The Internet is a major part of people’s lives, in a forever changing world. It’s hard to think of as a whole entity yet it is possible to map the entire thing. Computer scientists at the University of Wisconsin have proved so by releasing the first map of the infrastructure that supports the heart of the US internet. It took Paul Barford and his colleagues four years to produce the map.

Barford told Smithsonianmag:

“The map shows the paths taken by the long-distance fiber-optic cables that carry Internet data across the continental U.S. The exact routes of those cables, which belong to major telecommunications companies such as AT&T and Level 3, have not been previously publicly viewable, despite the fact that they are effectively critical public infrastructure”

There may well be other maps in existence, yet none are in the public domain. Many attempts in the past have been deemed as illegal and a security risk. However, the map has been allowed because homeland security has made the map, the data being available to the public via a project dubbed as “Predict”

This is the map, the black lines are the cables. Red boxes represent where they connect to each other.

Thank you to smithsonianmag for providing us with this information. 

Pictures courtesy of virtuallyfromscratch 

Huawei: 5G Will Be Here By 2020 – Speeds Up To 100X Faster Than 4G

4G has now been implemented around the globe in major cities for just over a year now. Looking for constant advancement in technology, Huawei have claimed that their new 5G infrastructure and technology will reach 100 times the speed of 4G by the year 2020.

As we reported, Huawei have announced their plans for a 4.5G opening in China by 2016, so this information coming to light is quite interesting. Will 4.5G still be worked on, or is Huawei looking to skip it and reach straight for the stars? 4.5G is set to provide the average user with 100Mbps speeds stable and support up to 30,000,000 connections per tower – set to be somewhat of a ‘patch’ for the current 4G offering, which often experiences connectivity, signal and data transfer issues.

In comes 5G, claiming a 10Gps peak transfer speed – quite possibly faster than your phone can process. Coming from backward Australia, I can only dream of a day when internet will out-perform things like your computers HDD speeds or LAN infrastructure – with 5G in the pipeline, it seems like somewhat of a reality.

As with all new major advancements in technology from 4K cable streaming to 10km data “fricken lasers”, the cost of the research, installment and implementation is always something to consider. Taking a look at 4G speeds currently, they’re amazing and offer the user with speeds that are likely much faster than their current ADSL2+ offering, but are extremely expensive. An Australian eSports group called ACL PRO often experience issues with venue internet being poor in Australia – meaning that they have to run their StarCraft II tournaments via multiple 4G ‘wireless sticks’ – seeing hundreds of dollars worth of data transfer flushed down the drain per event. Wouldn’t it be amazing if one day, we could do away with home line ADSL style internet and simply power our whole houses infrastructure simply by walking inside with our mobile phone? Until then, enjoy thousands of dollars a month in downloads of shareware programs and creative commons music through your 4G connection – if you can even get one.

Back to the topic at hand, 5G is set to allow you to reach speeds of up to 10Gpbs, we’ve decided to list out the speeds below to give you an easily viewable comparison of past and future technology.

  • 2G: A few hundred k per second
  • 3G: Up to a few M per second
  • 4G: Two hundred M per second
  • 5G:  10Gbps

Chinese Ministry of Industry and Information Technology Chief Engineer Zhang Feng has announced that the global information and communications industry is ushering in a new wave of innovation, cloud computing, networking and other technologies alongside the rapid redevelopment of new applications. All said to be supported by an amazing 5G mobile internet infrastructure.

We will continue to report as the story develops.

Image courtesy of TNW