AT&T to Release Sonim XP6, Rugged Anti-Smartphone

American mobile operator AT&T has just announced a new product under the ‘anti-smartphone’ category – the Sonim XP6. Said to be extremely rugged in design, this new smartphone incorporates a physical keyboard and button support into its architecture. This announced device has been marketed as a phone that can support most common features as seen in regular smartphones, but provides the user with a rugged alternative useable in all scenarios and situations.

The Sonim XP6 can be used with AT&T’s EPTT press-to-talk service, giving consumers another way to manage their clients, management and staff easier whilst on the work site. They’ve also been given IP68 and  IP69 certifications, meaning it is resistant against splashes of water, mud or any other liquid you may come into contact with while on the grind.

Marketed as drop-resistant, said to be able to be comfortably dropped onto a concrete floor, the Sonim XP6’s screen can also be seen in direct sunlight. AT&T have further included an extremely loud 103 db phone ringer capability, said to help identify when calls are coming over the sound of heavy machinery.

There hasn’t been an announced release date or price for this phone yet, but given it’s ‘industrial’ nature – you can exepct it to be quite pricey. This is a common trend amongst companies who cater products towards a commercial audience, why should they lower the price when it’s a company paying for the goods?

Image courtesy of Chiphell

King of the 3D-Castle

We’ve seen many things 3D printed before, but this one is my favourites by far. The Minnesota based Andrey Rudenko has amazed us before with his goal of a 3D printed house and his concrete 3D printer is already a reality. He has shown us some smaller projects in the past and is now stepping up the size.

A couple of months ago he announced that he was going to print a 3D castle as a large scale test before printing his house. Not only has he begun this process, he is almost done with it. The ability to print smaller buildings would give him the confidence to advance on to the full scale, he told.

The castle is big enough for people to both stand and walk inside and he is currently printing 50 cm of height every 8 hours. Test have shown that he could go as high as 75-100 cm during warm temperatures. The dark-grey area on the images show one such printing period.

“I still have some imperfections, mostly when I stop the printer,” Rudenko wrote. “But if I print nonstop, the layers look great.Though I’m not completely finished with this structure yet, from the current progress, I can already see that I am ready for the next step, which is printing a house with this technology.”

Rudenko is still a little behind his original schedule, wanting to start the print of his house this summer. While the summer isn’t over yet, it seems unlikely that he’ll manage to stick to that timeline. The small delay doesn’t diminish the awesomeness of his projects and I for one can’t wait to see this one finished.

Rudenko also told that he still plans to make a few improvements to the printer and redesign a few parts of the house before the actual print. It should be clear by now that his dream of a fully printed house isn’t just a dream any more.

Thank you 3Dprint.com for providing us with this information

Image courtesy of 3Dprint.com

3D Printer Reportedly Can Build A House In A Day

Scientists claim to have developed a revolutionary new giant 3D concrete printer that can build a 2,500-square-foot house in just 24 hours. The 3D printer, developed by Professor Behrokh Khoshnevis from the University of Southern California, could be used to build a whole house, layer by layer, in a single day.

It is “basically scaling up 3D printing to the scale of building,” said Khoshnevis. “Contour Crafting” is a layered fabrication technology and has great potential for automating the construction of whole structures as well as sub-components. Using this process, a single house or a colony of houses, each with possibly a different design, may be automatically constructed in a single run, embedded in each house all the conduits for electrical, plumbing and air-conditioning.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=31jkjsZPjtQ[/youtube]

The potential applications of this technology are far-reaching including in emergency, low-income, and commercial housing. The technology may potentially reduce energy use and emissions by using a rapid-prototype or 3D printing process to fabricate large components, according to the project website. Featuring robotic arms and extrusion nozzles, a computer-controlled gantry system moves the nozzle back and forth.

The main advantages of the Contour Crafting process over existing technologies are the superior surface finish that is realised and the greatly enhanced speed of fabrication.

Thank you NDTV for providing us with this information
Image and video courtesy of NDTV