U.S. Navy Doesn’t Trust Lenovo With Their Weapon Systems

You don’t trust anyone with the control of your weapon systems and it looks like the U.S. Navy isn’t too pleased with Lenovo’s recent purchase of the IBM Server division.

According to the Wall Street Journal, the Navy is looking at dropping the IBM servers from some weapon systems after the company’s server line was purchased by Lenovo Group Ltd, a Chinese company.

The last years headlines have shown more than once that security and threats don’t just come from software, but that hardware is an equal access point. With something as crucial as weapon systems, one can understand that the Navy wants to be on the safe side.

On the other hand, more and more reminders of us the cold war era. Russia developing their own CPUs because they don’t trust the west, the U.S. placing trade restriction on China forbidding the sale of the most powerful supercomputers to them, and now this story.

Lenovo spokesman Ray Gorman said that the company generally declined to comment on customer contracts and as such didn’t have anything else to say to this particular case and instead pointed the finger in the direction of the Ministry of Finance.

Lenovo paid a price of $ 2.1 billion when they bought IBM’s low-end x86 server business last year.

Plans For A New Spy Plane In The Works, Codenamed SR-72

Throughout most part of the Cold War, the U.S. Air Force turned to the SR-71 Blackbird for many of its most important spy missions. The jet-black jet could fly at more than three times the speed of sound and at altitudes of 85,000 feet, faster and higher than anything adversaries had to counter it.

The last flights of the Blackbirds were in 1999 and the U.S. military hasn’t had anything close to them since. It appears that now, Lockheed-Martin, the maker of the SR-71, says the “Son of the Blackbird,” the SR-72, is in the works and it will be twice as fast as and way more lethal than its father. That’s because the SR-72 will be designed to launch missiles, something the SR-71 didn’t do.

“Even with the SR-71, at Mach 3, there was still time to notify that the plane was coming, but at Mach 6, there is no reaction time to hide a mobile target,” Brad Leland, Lockheed Martin’s program manager for hypersonic, told Aviation Week and Space Technology. For those interested in knowing more about this futuristic spy plane can have a look at the publication here which provides a detailed look at the SR-72 plans.

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